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Index: S

S command (sendmail): 10.6.3. The Set Ruleset Command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sabotage (see denial of service attacks)
SAGE (System Administrators Guild): A.6.4. System Administrators Guild (SAGE) (Building Internet Firewalls)
B.1. Sources of Information (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SAINT (automated system monitoring): 12.4.3. Automated Monitoring (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sales information: 1.3.1. Documentation (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Samba: 17.4.1. Samba (Building Internet Firewalls)
daemon: 9.3. Using Samba to Share Resources with Windows (TCP/IP Network Administration)
directory sharing: 9.3.1.2. Sharing directories through Samba (TCP/IP Network Administration)
name servers: 9.3.2. NetBIOS Name Service (TCP/IP Network Administration)
overview: 9.3. Using Samba to Share Resources with Windows (TCP/IP Network Administration)
passwords: 9.3.1. Configuring a Samba Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
PC/NFS and: 10.2.1. NFS versus SMB (CIFS) (Managing NFS and NIS)
printer sharing: 3.5.2. Print Services (TCP/IP Network Administration)
9.3.1.3. Sharing printers through Samba (TCP/IP Network Administration)
server, configuring: 9.3.1. Configuring a Samba Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sample programs, obtaining: 0.5. Obtaining the Example Programs (DNS and Bind)
samspade tool: A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
sandbox security model: 15.4.3. Java (Building Internet Firewalls)
Sanitize privacy scripts: 5.5.1. sanitize (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SANS Institute: Institute (Building Internet Firewalls) A.6.5. System Administration, Networking, and Security (SANS)
SAns statistic: 7.6.2.1. BIND 4.9 and 8 statistics (DNS and Bind)
8.1.2. Capacity Planning (DNS and Bind)
SANS (System Administration, Networking and Security) Institute web site: 12.1.2.2. Use the network to distribute information (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SARA (automated system monitoring): 12.4.3. Automated Monitoring (TCP/IP Network Administration)
satan scanning tool: 11.4. Security Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SATAN (Security Administrator's Tool for Analyzing Networks): 11.6. Running a Security Audit (Building Internet Firewalls)
B.2.4. SATAN (Building Internet Firewalls)
diagnostics and: 14.4.5. SATAN (Managing NFS and NIS)
saturation, network collisions: 17.1.2. Collisions and network saturation (Managing NFS and NIS)
saturation points: A. Using Input and Output Octets (Essential SNMP)
saving changes in tkined: 7.2.3.6. Caveats (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SAY command (chat): A.3. chat (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sc command: 12.4.1. How Are Services Managed Under Windows NT? (Building Internet Firewalls)
scalability
address translation compared to proxy servers: 4.2.1. Obtaining an IP Address (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DNS: 3.3. DNS (TCP/IP Network Administration)
gateway hierarchy: 2.3. Internet Routing Architecture (TCP/IP Network Administration)
host tables: 3.2. The Host Table (TCP/IP Network Administration)
scalar objects
data collection and: 9.2.3.1. Designing collections (Essential SNMP)
graphing in MRTG: 13.3. Graphing Other Objects (Essential SNMP)
OIDs: 2.6.1. The get Operation (Essential SNMP)
11.2.1. Extensibility for Unix and Windows NT (Essential SNMP)
scaling
graphs: 8.4.1.1. mrtg configuration file (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
scalability vs. raw capacity: 1.3.2.4. Economic considerations (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
test networks: 9.2. Network Emulators and Simulators (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
scaninterval (gated): B.6. Interface Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
scanners, security: 11.4. Security Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
scanning ports: 4.8.1. Port Scanning (Building Internet Firewalls)
scanning tools
security and politics: 6.6. Politics and Security (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
uses: 2.1.7. Scanning Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Windows tools: 2.3. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SCCS
map files: 4.2.5. Source code control for map files (Managing NFS and NIS)
maps, disadvantages: 4.2.5. Source code control for map files (Managing NFS and NIS)
scheduler in initialization: 2.2.4. Startup Files and Scripts (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
schema, X.500 and: 2.2.4. X.500 (Managing NFS and NIS)
scion statistics tool: 8.4. Network-Monitoring Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SCM (Service Control Manager): 12.4.1. How Are Services Managed Under Windows NT? (Building Internet Firewalls)
ScoreBoardFile directives (httpd.conf file): 11.3.4. Defining Where Things Are Stored (TCP/IP Network Administration)
scorekeepers: 1.2.2.3. Scorekeepers (Building Internet Firewalls)
scotty management tool
Microsoft Windows: 6.7.2. Other Tools for Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SNMP usage: 7.2.2. scotty (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
source web site: A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
tkined requirements: 6.5.1.2. Autodiscovery with tkined (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
scp2: 3.8.2. scp2/sftp Details (SSH, The Secure Shell)
compatibility with scp1: 7.4.14. SSH1/SSH2 Compatibility (SSH, The Secure Shell)
debugging: 7.4.15. Logging and Debugging (SSH, The Secure Shell)
regular expressions: A. SSH2 Manpage for sshregex (SSH, The Secure Shell)
12.2.6. Secure Shell (TCP/IP Network Administration)
scp (Secure Copy Program): 1.4.2. Secure File Transfer (SSH, The Secure Shell)
2.2.1. File Transfer with scp (SSH, The Secure Shell)
2.2.1. File Transfer with scp (SSH, The Secure Shell)
7.5. Secure Copy with scp (SSH, The Secure Shell)
authentication through local agents: 2.5.3. Agent Forwarding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
broken features, unexpected behaviors: 12.2.5.1. General client problems (SSH, The Secure Shell)
command line
failure of wildcards or shell variables: 12.2.5.4. scp (SSH, The Secure Shell)
options: 4.1.5.11. scp behavior (SSH, The Secure Shell)
compile-time configuration: 4.1.5.11. scp behavior (SSH, The Secure Shell)
copy access to your account, allowing others: 12.2.5.4. scp (SSH, The Secure Shell)
display of statistics: 4.1.5.11. scp behavior (SSH, The Secure Shell)
double-remote copying: 2.5.2. A More Complex Passphrase Problem (SSH, The Secure Shell)
environment variables: 4.1.5.11. scp behavior (SSH, The Secure Shell)
7.5.7.1. scp1 statistics (SSH, The Secure Shell)
error messages
"Not a regular file": 12.2.5.4. scp (SSH, The Secure Shell)
"packet too long": 12.2.5.4. scp (SSH, The Secure Shell)
"Write failed after flushing stdout buffer. write stdout. Broken pipe.": 12.2.5.4. scp (SSH, The Secure Shell)
failure of copy to remote machine: 12.2.5.4. scp (SSH, The Secure Shell)
file ownership, preserving in copied files: 12.2.5.4. scp (SSH, The Secure Shell)
gateway hosts and: 11.5.2. Using SCP Through a Gateway (SSH, The Secure Shell)
keywords: B.4. ssh and scp Keywords (SSH, The Secure Shell)
options: B.6. scp Options (SSH, The Secure Shell)
protocols: 3.8. SSH and File Transfers (scp and sftp) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
statistics display: 7.5.7. Statistics Display (SSH, The Secure Shell)
syntax: 2.2.1. File Transfer with scp (SSH, The Secure Shell)
7.5.1. Full Syntax (SSH, The Secure Shell)
troubleshooting wildcards and shell variables: 12.1.2. Server Debugging (SSH, The Secure Shell)
scrambling addresses in data: 5.5.2. tcpdpriv (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
screen captures: 11.1.1. Automating Documentation (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
11.5. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
screened hosts
screened subnets and: 6.5.7. It's Dangerous to Use Both Screened Subnets and Screened Hosts (Building Internet Firewalls)
architecture of: 6.2. Screened Host Architectures (Building Internet Firewalls)
screened subnets: 6.3. Screened Subnet Architectures (Building Internet Firewalls)
12.7. Firewalls (TCP/IP Network Administration)
screened hosts and: 6.5.7. It's Dangerous to Use Both Screened Subnets and Screened Hosts (Building Internet Firewalls)
architecture of: 6.3. Screened Subnet Architectures (Building Internet Firewalls)
24.1. Screened Subnet Architecture (Building Internet Firewalls)
screening routers: 4.1. What Does a Packet Look Like? (Building Internet Firewalls)
4.1. What Does a Packet Look Like? (Building Internet Firewalls)
5.2. Packet Filtering (Building Internet Firewalls)
6.1.1. Screening Router (Building Internet Firewalls)
acceptable addresses for: 8.5. Conventions for Packet Filtering Rules (Building Internet Firewalls)
choosing: 8.8. Choosing a Packet Filtering Router (Building Internet Firewalls)
configuring: 8.2. Configuring a Packet Filtering Router (Building Internet Firewalls)
proxy systems: 9. Proxy Systems (Building Internet Firewalls)
rules for: 8.5. Conventions for Packet Filtering Rules (Building Internet Firewalls)
where to use: 8.10. Where to Do Packet Filtering (Building Internet Firewalls)
script command file output: 5.4.1. Using tcpdump (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
11.1.1. Automating Documentation (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
ScriptAlias directive (httpd.conf file): 11.3.4. Defining Where Things Are Stored (TCP/IP Network Administration)
scripts
adding to OpenView menus: B.2. Adding a Menu to NNM (Essential SNMP)
books and resources: B.2.8. Scripting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
disk-space checker: 12.5. Disk-Space Checker (Essential SNMP)
extensible SNMP agents: 7.2.1.8. Agents and traps (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
languages for device discovery: 6.1.2. Discovery and Mapping Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
MGEN and: 9.1.2.2. MGEN (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
port monitoring: 12.6. Port Monitor (Essential SNMP)
recording logins: 12.2. Who's Logging into My Machine? (I-Am-in) (Essential SNMP)
12.2. Who's Logging into My Machine? (I-Am-in) (Essential SNMP)
scripting tools
network management: 6.4. Scripts (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
network maps and: 6.5. Mapping or Diagramming (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
startup: 2.2.4. Startup Files and Scripts (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
system initialization: 5.2.1.1. Understanding /etc/inittab (TCP/IP Network Administration)
throw core: 12.3. Throw Core (Essential SNMP)
trap generation: 12.1. General Trap-Generation Program (Essential SNMP)
Veritas disk check script: 12.4. Veritas Disk Check (Essential SNMP)
SDupQ statistic: 7.6.2.1. BIND 4.9 and 8 statistics (DNS and Bind)
SEAM (Sun Enterprise Authentication Mechanism): 12.5.5.2. SEAM: Kerberos V5 for Solaris (Managing NFS and NIS)
search algorithm: 13.4. The Resolver Search Algorithm and Negative Caching (BIND 8) (DNS and Bind)
search directive: 6.1. The Resolver (DNS and Bind)
6.1.3. The search Directive (DNS and Bind)
E.5.2. search (DNS and Bind)
search entry (resolv.conf file): 8.2.1. The Resolver Configuration File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
search list: 6.1.2. The Search List (DNS and Bind)
nslookup and: 12.1.3. The Search List (DNS and Bind)
avoiding with: 12.4. Avoiding the Search List (DNS and Bind)
search option (nslookup): 12.3. Option Settings (DNS and Bind)
search paths, automounter and: 9.6.1. Long search paths (Managing NFS and NIS)
searching
exhaustive database (see inverse queries)
for IP addresses: 3.1.2. Finding IP Addresses (DNS and Bind)
us domain name space: 3.2.3.1. The us domain (DNS and Bind)
SEAS (Solaris Easy Access Server): 8.2. Setting up a diskless client (Managing NFS and NIS)
sec= option (vfstab file): 9.1.3.2. The vfstab and fstab files (TCP/IP Network Administration)
second-level domains: 2.1.2. Domains (DNS and Bind)
2.1.2. Domains (DNS and Bind)
names of: 3.2.2. Where in the World Do I Fit? (DNS and Bind)
secondary directive: E.2.3. secondary (DNS and Bind)
secondary master name servers (see slave name servers)
secondary servers: 3.3.4. BIND, Resolvers, and named (TCP/IP Network Administration)
secondary statements, adding: 4.9. Adding More Zones (DNS and Bind)
SecPanel: 13.4. Other SSH-Related Products (SSH, The Secure Shell)
secrecy in organizations: 1.3.2.1. Professionalism (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
secrecy, keys and passphrases: 2.4.2. Generating Key Pairs with ssh-keygen (SSH, The Secure Shell)
secret field (chap-secrets file): 6.3.4. PPP Daemon Security (TCP/IP Network Administration)
secret-key ciphers: 3.2.2. Public- and Secret-Key Cryptography (SSH, The Secure Shell)
secret key, symmetric key encryption: 12.5.2.1. Symmetric key encryption (Managing NFS and NIS)
secring.gpg file: 12.6.2. Public-Key Encryption Tools (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SECSH (Secure Shell) working group: 1.5. History of SSH (SSH, The Secure Shell)
sec=type option (share command): 9.1.2.1. The share command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
secure channel: 2.2. Remote Terminal Sessions with ssh (SSH, The Secure Shell)
Secure Copy Program (see SCP)
secure HTTP: 8.3.1.2. Web mode (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
secure mode in syslog: 11.2.1.2. Remote logging (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
secure NFS: 12.5.4.1. Old terms: AUTH_DES, secure RPC, and, secure NFS (Managing NFS and NIS)
secure RPC: 12.5.4.1. Old terms: AUTH_DES, secure RPC, and, secure NFS (Managing NFS and NIS)
secure servers, bastion hosts: 12.7. Firewalls (TCP/IP Network Administration)
secure shell (see SSH)
Secure Socket Layer (see SSL)
Secure Socket Layers (SSL): Protocol (SSH, The Secure Shell) 1.6.6. Secure Socket Layer (SSL)
secure syslog tool: 11.2.1.2. Remote logging (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SecureCRT: 13.3. Table of Products (SSH, The Secure Shell)
15. SecureCRT (Windows) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
authentication methods: 15.4.1. Mandatory Fields (SSH, The Secure Shell)
client configuration: 15.2. Basic Client Use (SSH, The Secure Shell)
data compression: 15.4.2. Data Compression (SSH, The Secure Shell)
encryption algorithms, specification: 15.4.1. Mandatory Fields (SSH, The Secure Shell)
forwarding: 15.5. Forwarding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
identities: 15.3.2. Using Multiple Identities (SSH, The Secure Shell)
installing: 15.1. Obtaining and Installing (SSH, The Secure Shell)
key management: 15.3. Key Management (SSH, The Secure Shell)
keys, generating: 15.3.1. RSA Key Generation Wizard (SSH, The Secure Shell)
keys, installing: 15.3.1. RSA Key Generation Wizard (SSH, The Secure Shell)
port forwarding: 15.5.1. Port Forwarding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ports: 15.4.1. Mandatory Fields (SSH, The Secure Shell)
protocols: 15.4.1. Mandatory Fields (SSH, The Secure Shell)
secure file copy with ZModem: 15. SecureCRT (Windows) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
session and global options: 15.4. Advanced Client Use (SSH, The Secure Shell)
Session Options window, mandatory fields: 15.4.1. Mandatory Fields (SSH, The Secure Shell)
sessions: 15.2. Basic Client Use (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SOCKS: 15.4.4. Firewall Use (SSH, The Secure Shell)
TIS authentication: 15.4.3. TIS Authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
troubleshooting: 15.6. Troubleshooting (SSH, The Secure Shell)
X forwarding: 15.5.2. X Forwarding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SecureFX: 11.2. FTP Forwarding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
13.3. Table of Products (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SecureKoalaTerm: 13.3. Table of Products (SSH, The Secure Shell)
securenets file: 12.3.2.1. The secure nets file (Managing NFS and NIS)
secure_zone records: 11.2.2.2. Restricting queries in a particular zone (DNS and Bind)
SecurID
authentication using: 3.4.2.5. One-time passwords (SSH, The Secure Shell)
5.5.1.9. SecurID authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
compile-time configuration: 4.1.5.7. Authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
security (see also security issues):
11. Security (DNS and Bind)
1.5. What Is an Internet Firewall? (Building Internet Firewalls)
7.2. Security Concerns (Essential SNMP)
A.3. chat (TCP/IP Network Administration)
of BSD r commands: 18.2.1. BSD "r" Commands (Building Internet Firewalls)
on Unix/Linux: 18.2.1. BSD "r" Commands (Building Internet Firewalls)
on Windows: 18.2.1.1. BSD "r" commands under Windows NT (Building Internet Firewalls)
of computer games: 23.2. Games (Building Internet Firewalls)
of database protocols: 23.1.1. Locating Database Servers (Building Internet Firewalls)
of email: 16.1.1. Keeping Mail Secret (Building Internet Firewalls)
of FTP: 17.1.4. Providing Anonymous FTP Service (Building Internet Firewalls)
of ICMP: 22.4. ICMP and Network Diagnostics (Building Internet Firewalls)
of Java: 15.4.3. Java (Building Internet Firewalls)
of JavaScript: 15.4.1. JavaScript (Building Internet Firewalls)
of lpr and lp printing systems: 17.6.1. lpr and lp (Building Internet Firewalls)
of Net8: 23.1.3.1. Security implications of SQL*Net and Net8 (Building Internet Firewalls)
of NetBT name service: 20.3.6. Security Implications of NetBT Name Service and WINS (Building Internet Firewalls)
of NIS: 20.2. Network Information Service (NIS) (Building Internet Firewalls)
of NNTP: 16.9. Network News Transfer Protocol (NNTP) (Building Internet Firewalls)
of passwords: 21.2. Passwords (Building Internet Firewalls)
of PostScript printers: 17.6. Printing Protocols (Building Internet Firewalls)
of programs
indicators of: 13.5.3. Real Indicators of Security (Building Internet Firewalls)
evaluating: 13.5. Choosing Security-Critical Programs (Building Internet Firewalls)
of protocols: C.4. What Makes a Protocol Secure? (Building Internet Firewalls)
proxying and: 13.4.5. Protocol Security (Building Internet Firewalls)
of push technologies: 15.6. Push Technologies (Building Internet Firewalls)
of rdist: 22.6.1. rdist (Building Internet Firewalls)
of remote graphical interfaces on Windows operating systems: 18.3.2. Remote Graphic Interfaces for Microsoft Operating Systems (Building Internet Firewalls)
of routing protocols: 22.2. Routing Protocols (Building Internet Firewalls)
of Sendmail: 16.2.7. Sendmail (Building Internet Firewalls)
of SQL*Net: 23.1.3.1. Security implications of SQL*Net and Net8 (Building Internet Firewalls)
of SSH: 18.2.5.1. What makes SSH secure? (Building Internet Firewalls)
of VBScript: 15.4.2. VBScript (Building Internet Firewalls)
of Windows Browser: 20.4.4. Security Implications of the Windows Browser (Building Internet Firewalls)
of WINS: 20.3.6. Security Implications of NetBT Name Service and WINS (Building Internet Firewalls)
of X Window System: 18.3.1. X11 Window System (Building Internet Firewalls)
access control
language extensions: 12.5.1.3. Optional access control language extensions (TCP/IP Network Administration)
overview: 12.5. Access Control (TCP/IP Network Administration)
shell command: 12.5.1.2. Defining an optional shell command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
tcpd: 12.5.1.1. tcpd access control files (TCP/IP Network Administration)
account permissions: 2.4.3. Installing a Public Key on an SSH ServerMachine (SSH, The Secure Shell)
aclok option (share command): 9.1.2.1. The share command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
ACLs: 12.4.8. Access control lists (Managing NFS and NIS)
ActiveX and: 15.4.4. ActiveX (Building Internet Firewalls)
address spoofing: 4.2.1. Obtaining an IP Address (TCP/IP Network Administration)
address translation: 4.2.1. Obtaining an IP Address (TCP/IP Network Administration)
against system failure: 3.5. Fail-Safe Stance (Building Internet Firewalls)
anonymous users, mapping: 12.4.3. Unknown user mapping (Managing NFS and NIS)
applications
removing unnecessary: 12.3.1. Remove Unnecessary Software (TCP/IP Network Administration)
updating: 12.3.2. Keep Software Updated (TCP/IP Network Administration)
asymmetric key encryption: 12.5.2.2. Asymmetric key encryption (Managing NFS and NIS)
audit: 10.10.7. Running a Security Audit (Building Internet Firewalls)
on Unix: 11.6. Running a Security Audit (Building Internet Firewalls)
AUTH_DH: 12.5.4. AUTH_DH: Diffie-Hellman authentication (Managing NFS and NIS)
authentication: 12.2. How secure are NIS and NFS? (Managing NFS and NIS)
shadow password files: 12.2.1. The Shadow Password File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
ssh: 12.2.6. Secure Shell (TCP/IP Network Administration)
authentication-failure traps: 7.1. Parameter Settings (Essential SNMP)
AUTH_SYS security flavor: 12.2. How secure are NIS and NFS? (Managing NFS and NIS)
of backups: 10.12. Protecting the Machine and Backups (Building Internet Firewalls)
bastion host speed and: 10.3.2. How Fast a Machine? (Building Internet Firewalls)
BIND and
features of: 3.1. Getting BIND (DNS and Bind)
patches for: 3.1. Getting BIND (DNS and Bind)
books on: A.9. Books (Building Internet Firewalls)
chat: A.3. chat (TCP/IP Network Administration)
of checksums: 27.5.3. Keeping Secured Checksums (Building Internet Firewalls)
choke points: 24.1.4.3. Choke point (Building Internet Firewalls)
24.2.4.3. Choke point (Building Internet Firewalls)
choosing hosts and: 8.1.1. Where Do I Put My Name Servers? (DNS and Bind)
community strings: 2.2. SNMP Communities (Essential SNMP)
7.2. Security Concerns (Essential SNMP)
cryptography: 12.5.2. Brief introduction to cryptography (Managing NFS and NIS)
DCE/DFS: 12.2. How secure are NIS and NFS? (Managing NFS and NIS)
dedicated connections and: 6.3.1. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
default deny stance: 8.2.3. Default Permit Versus Default Deny (Building Internet Firewalls)
default permit stance: 8.2.3. Default Permit Versus Default Deny (Building Internet Firewalls)
defense in depth: 24.1.4.2. Defense in depth (Building Internet Firewalls)
24.2.4.2. Defense in depth (Building Internet Firewalls)
designing for network: 1.6.1. Buying Versus Building (Building Internet Firewalls)
distributing responsibility: 12.1.2. Distributed Control (TCP/IP Network Administration)
subnets: 12.1.2.1. Use subnets to distribute control (TCP/IP Network Administration)
diversity of defense: 3.7. Diversity of Defense (Building Internet Firewalls)
24.1.4.7. Diversity of defense (Building Internet Firewalls)
24.2.4.7. Diversity of defense (Building Internet Firewalls)
of DNS: 20.1.4. DNS Security Problems (Building Internet Firewalls)
drills for, practicing: 27.5.7. Doing Drills (Building Internet Firewalls)
encryption: 12.6. Encryption (TCP/IP Network Administration)
public key: 12.6. Encryption (TCP/IP Network Administration)
public key tools: 12.6.2. Public-Key Encryption Tools (TCP/IP Network Administration)
stunnel: 12.6.2.1. stunnel (TCP/IP Network Administration)
symmetric: 12.6.1. When Is Symmetric Encryption Useful? (TCP/IP Network Administration)
extension scripts and: 11.2.1. Extensibility for Unix and Windows NT (Essential SNMP)
fail-safe stance: 24.1.4.5. Fail-safe stance (Building Internet Firewalls)
24.2.4.5. Fail-safe stance (Building Internet Firewalls)
filesystem access: 12.4.4. Access to filesystems (Managing NFS and NIS)
firewalls: 12.4.7. Using NFS through firewalls (Managing NFS and NIS)
11.3. DNS and Internet Firewalls (DNS and Bind)
7.2. Security Concerns (Essential SNMP)
filtering routers: 12.7.2. Filtering Traffic with iptables (TCP/IP Network Administration)
functions of: 12.7.1. Functions of the Firewall (TCP/IP Network Administration)
iptables command: 12.7.2.1. Defining iptables filter rules (TCP/IP Network Administration)
overview: 12.7. Firewalls (TCP/IP Network Administration)
future of: 7.6.2. Security (Managing NFS and NIS)
host: 1.4.3. Host Security (Building Internet Firewalls)
of HTTP: 15.1. HTTP Server Security (Building Internet Firewalls)
incident response teams (see incident response teams)
incidents (see incidents)
information resources: 12.1.2.2. Use the network to distribute information (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Internet connection considerations: 4.1. Connected and Non-Connected Networks (TCP/IP Network Administration)
IPsec: 12.5.3. NFS and IPSec (Managing NFS and NIS)
of IRC: 19.1. Internet Relay Chat (IRC) (Building Internet Firewalls)
Kerberos V5: 12.5.5. RPCSEC_GSS: Generic security services for RPC (Managing NFS and NIS)
lack of: 1.4. How Can You Protect Your Site? (Building Internet Firewalls)
LDAP and: 12.2. How secure are NIS and NFS? (Managing NFS and NIS)
least privilege: 24.1.4.1. Least privilege (Building Internet Firewalls)
24.2.4.1. Least privilege (Building Internet Firewalls)
legal responsibilities: 25.2.3. External Factors That Influence Security Policies (Building Internet Firewalls)
limiting requests to agents: 7.2. Security Concerns (Essential SNMP)
7.3.4.2. Creating a configuration by hand (Essential SNMP)
login restrictions: 12.1. User-oriented network security (Managing NFS and NIS)
of machine: 10.9. Securing the Machine (Building Internet Firewalls)
Unix/Linux: 11.2.1. Setting Up System Logs on Unix (Building Internet Firewalls)
Windows NT: 12.3.1. Setting Up System Logs Under Windows NT (Building Internet Firewalls)
MACs: 12.5.2.4. One-way hash functions and MACs (Managing NFS and NIS)
maps, private: 12.3.2. Making NIS more secure (Managing NFS and NIS)
methods for remote account access: 1. Introduction to SSH (SSH, The Secure Shell)
models: 1.4.2. Security Through Obscurity (Building Internet Firewalls)
modem pools: 6.6. Terminal Servers and Modem Pools (Building Internet Firewalls)
for name servers: 11.2. Securing Your Name Server (DNS and Bind)
netacl: 11.4.1.2. Using netacl to protect services (Building Internet Firewalls)
netgroups: 12.1.3. Using netgroups (Managing NFS and NIS)
networks
insecure: 6.7.2. Insecure Networks (Building Internet Firewalls)
protecting: 6.7. Internal Firewalls (Building Internet Firewalls)
NFS: 12.4. NFS security (Managing NFS and NIS)
future of: 12.5.7. NFS security futures (Managing NFS and NIS)
increasing: 12.5. Stronger security for NFS (Managing NFS and NIS)
increasing, transition: 12.5.6. Planning a transition from NFS/sys to stronger NFS security (Managing NFS and NIS)
levels: 12.2. How secure are NIS and NFS? (Managing NFS and NIS)
RPC: 12.4.1. RPC security (Managing NFS and NIS)
superuser mapping: 12.4.2. Superuser mapping (Managing NFS and NIS)
version 4 and: 7.6.1. NFS Version 4 (Managing NFS and NIS)
NIS
increasing: 12.3.2. Making NIS more secure (Managing NFS and NIS)
passwords: 12.3. Password and NIS security (Managing NFS and NIS)
NIS+ and: 2.2.3. NIS+ (Managing NFS and NIS)
NIS levels: 12.2. How secure are NIS and NFS? (Managing NFS and NIS)
one-way hash functions: 12.5.2.4. One-way hash functions and MACs (Managing NFS and NIS)
operating system bugs: 10.9.2. Fix All Known System Bugs (Building Internet Firewalls)
passwords
one-time: 12.2.3. One-Time Passwords (TCP/IP Network Administration)
OPIE: 12.2.4. OPIE (TCP/IP Network Administration)
selecting: 12.2.2. Choosing a Password (TCP/IP Network Administration)
per-account configuration: 8.1. Limits of This Technique (SSH, The Secure Shell)
performance and: 12.5.5.4. Security and performance (Managing NFS and NIS)
planning, overview: 12.1. Security Planning (TCP/IP Network Administration)
policies, creating: 12.1.3. Writing a Security Policy (TCP/IP Network Administration)
policies for: 1.5.1.1. A firewall is a focus for security decisions (Building Internet Firewalls)
25. Security Policies (Building Internet Firewalls)
reviewing: 25.1.1.6. Provision for reviews (Building Internet Firewalls)
polling over the Internet: 3.2. NMS Architectures (Essential SNMP)
of POP: 16.6. Post Office Protocol (POP) (Building Internet Firewalls)
port monitoring: 12.4.6. Port monitoring (Managing NFS and NIS)
PPP: 6.3.4. PPP Daemon Security (TCP/IP Network Administration)
private keys: 12.5.4.6. Public and private keys (Managing NFS and NIS)
proxy servers: 4.2.1. Obtaining an IP Address (TCP/IP Network Administration)
public key exchange: 12.5.2.3. Public key exchange (Managing NFS and NIS)
public keys: 12.5.4.6. Public and private keys (Managing NFS and NIS)
queries, restricting: 11.2.2. Restricting Queries (DNS and Bind)
r commands (Unix): 12.2.5. Secure the r Commands (TCP/IP Network Administration)
disabling: 12.2.6. Secure Shell (TCP/IP Network Administration)
read-only access: 12.4.5. Read-only access (Managing NFS and NIS)
refused queries and: 12.7.4. Query Refused (DNS and Bind)
remote logins: 1.4.1. Secure Remote Logins (SSH, The Secure Shell)
resolvers and: 11.2.5.2. "Resolving" name server configuration (DNS and Bind)
resources: 12.8. Words to the Wise (TCP/IP Network Administration)
A. Resources (Building Internet Firewalls)
response from unexpected source message: 7.6.1. Common Syslog Messages (DNS and Bind)
risks: 4.1. Connected and Non-Connected Networks (TCP/IP Network Administration)
types of: 12.1.1. Assessing the Threat (TCP/IP Network Administration)
RPC: 12.4.1. RPC security (Managing NFS and NIS)
RPC/DH: 12.5.4.3. How RPC/DH works (Managing NFS and NIS)
RPCSEC_GSS: 12.5.5. RPCSEC_GSS: Generic security services for RPC (Managing NFS and NIS)
Samba, encrypted passwords: 9.3.1. Configuring a Samba Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sandbox model: 15.4.3. Java (Building Internet Firewalls)
SATAN: 14.4.5. SATAN (Managing NFS and NIS)
SEAM: 12.5.5.2. SEAM: Kerberos V5 for Solaris (Managing NFS and NIS)
securenets file: 12.3.2.1. The secure nets file (Managing NFS and NIS)
services: 12.5.1. Security services (Managing NFS and NIS)
session keys: 12.5.4.8. Establishing a session key (Managing NFS and NIS)
setuid executables and: 12.4.2. Superuser mapping (Managing NFS and NIS)
simplicity of: 3.8. Simplicity (Building Internet Firewalls)
SMB (CIFS): 12.2. How secure are NIS and NFS? (Managing NFS and NIS)
of SNMP: 22.1.2. Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) (Building Internet Firewalls)
7.2. Security Concerns (Essential SNMP)
F. SNMPv3 (Essential SNMP)
SNMPv3 and: 7.2. Security Concerns (Essential SNMP)
F.1. Changes in SNMPv3 (Essential SNMP)
Cisco routers: F.2.1. Configuring SNMPv3 for a Cisco Router (Essential SNMP)
encryption: F.1.1. The SNMPv3 Engine (Essential SNMP)
F.2.1. Configuring SNMPv3 for a Cisco Router (Essential SNMP)
levels: F.1.4. SNMPv3 Textual Conventions (Essential SNMP)
Net-SNMP: F.2.2. Configuring SNMPv3 for Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
USM: F.1.4. SNMPv3 Textual Conventions (Essential SNMP)
ssh: 12.2.6. Secure Shell (TCP/IP Network Administration)
strategies for: 3. Security Strategies (Building Internet Firewalls)
symmetric key encryption: 12.5.2.1. Symmetric key encryption (Managing NFS and NIS)
system monitoring: 12.4.1. Know Your System (TCP/IP Network Administration)
find command: 12.4.2.1. Checking files (TCP/IP Network Administration)
intruder detection: 12.4.2. Looking for Trouble (TCP/IP Network Administration)
login activity: 12.4.2.2. Checking login activity (TCP/IP Network Administration)
TCP Wrapper: 11.4.1. Using the TCP Wrapper Package to Protect Services (Building Internet Firewalls)
terminal servers: 6.6. Terminal Servers and Modem Pools (Building Internet Firewalls)
time information and: 22.5. Network Time Protocol (NTP) (Building Internet Firewalls)
trusted hosts: 12.1.1. Trusted hosts and trusted users (Managing NFS and NIS)
12.2.5. Secure the r Commands (TCP/IP Network Administration)
trusted users: 12.1.1. Trusted hosts and trusted users (Managing NFS and NIS)
UIDs: 12.3.3. Unknown password entries (Managing NFS and NIS)
universal participation: 3.6. Universal Participation (Building Internet Firewalls)
24.1.4.6. Universal participation (Building Internet Firewalls)
24.2.4.6. Universal participation (Building Internet Firewalls)
user authentication: 12.2. User Authentication (TCP/IP Network Administration)
user-oriented: 12.1. User-oriented network security (Managing NFS and NIS)
vendors, information mailing lists: 12.1.2.2. Use the network to distribute information (TCP/IP Network Administration)
violations: 2.3.1. Known Hosts (SSH, The Secure Shell)
3.1.2. Integrity (SSH, The Secure Shell)
viruses: 12.6. Viruses (Managing NFS and NIS)
vulnerabilities of: 11.2.1. BIND Version (DNS and Bind)
weakest link: 3.4. Weakest Link (Building Internet Firewalls)
24.1.4.4. Weakest link (Building Internet Firewalls)
24.2.4.4. Weakest link (Building Internet Firewalls)
web servers
CGI scripts: 11.4.1. The CGI and SSI Threat (TCP/IP Network Administration)
overview: 11.4. Web Server Security (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SSI: 11.4.1. The CGI and SSI Threat (TCP/IP Network Administration)
when proxying is ineffective: 9.8.2. Proxying Won't Secure the Service (Building Internet Firewalls)
when system crashes: 10.12.1. Watch Reboots Carefully (Building Internet Firewalls)
of whois service: 20.7.2. whois (Building Internet Firewalls)
zone data, importance of backups for: 4.8.2. Backup Files (DNS and Bind)
zone transfers, preventing unauthorized: 11.2.3. Preventing Unauthorized Zone Transfers (DNS and Bind)
zones, Internet Exporer and: 15.2.5. Internet Explorer and Security Zones (Building Internet Firewalls)
security category: 7.5.3.1. BIND 8 categories (DNS and Bind)
security configuration files: 2.2.5.2. Security files (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
security issues
books and resources: B.2.7. Security (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
challenge response systems: 11.1.2. vnc (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
compromised ps command: 2.1.7. Scanning Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
discovery tools and: 6.6. Politics and Security (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
egos and: 1.3.2.2. Ego management (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
expn and vrfy telnet commands: 10.1.1. Email (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
levels in syslog: 11.2.1.1. Configuring syslog (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
network management software: 6.1.1. Characteristics of Management Software (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
packet capture and: 5. Packet Capture (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
5.7. Dark Side of Packet Capture (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
ping and DOS attacks: 3.3.3.1. Security and ICMP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
protecting networks: 5.7.2. Protecting Yourself (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
secrecy and: 1.3.2.1. Professionalism (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
security tools: 11.4. Security Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
cops: 11.4. Security Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
iss: 11.4. Security Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
nmap: 11.4. Security Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
portscan: 11.4. Security Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
sanitize: 5.5.1. sanitize (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
satan: 11.4. Security Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
system integrity checkers: 11.4. Security Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
tcpdpriv tool: 5.5.2. tcpdpriv (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
tcpwrappers: 11.2.3.1. tcpwrappers (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
11.4. Security Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
tripwire: 11.4.1. tripwire (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
segmented networks and: 5.2. Access to Traffic (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Smurf attacks: 3.3.3.2. Smurf Attacks (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SNMP security: 7.1. Overview of SNMP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
ssh tools: 11.1.3. ssh (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
switches and: 5.7.1. Switch Security (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
syslog files: 11.2.1.1. Configuring syslog (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
TCP streams and: 5.6.1.1. Using ethereal (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
testing firewalls: 12.2.1.1. Firewall testing (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
web server configuration: 10.1.2. HTTP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Windows and packet capture tools: 5.8. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
security manager (Java): 15.4.3. Java (Building Internet Firewalls)
security parameter (smb.config file): 9.3.1. Configuring a Samba Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
security roots: 11.4.5.1. Security roots (DNS and Bind)
Security Subsystem (SNMPv3): F.1.1. The SNMPv3 Engine (Essential SNMP)
security threats
countered by SSH: 3.10. Threats SSH Can Counter (SSH, The Secure Shell)
dictionary attack: 2.4.3. Installing a Public Key on an SSH ServerMachine (SSH, The Secure Shell)
not countered by SSH: 3.11. Threats SSH Doesn't Prevent (SSH, The Secure Shell)
seed devices: 6.2. Castle Rock's SNMPc Enterprise Edition (Essential SNMP)
6.2.2. Discovery and Filters (Essential SNMP)
seed files: 6.1.2. The netmon Process (Essential SNMP)
seeds: 3.7. Randomness (SSH, The Secure Shell)
segment header: Appendix g.2. TCP Segment Header (TCP/IP Network Administration)
segmenting networks: 5.2. Access to Traffic (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
segments: 1.3. TCP/IP Protocol Architecture (TCP/IP Network Administration)
format: 1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
TCP headers: 1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SELECT command (IMAP): 3.4.3. Internet Message Access Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
selector fields in syslog configuration: 11.2.1.1. Configuring syslog (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
self-decrypting archives: 16.1.1. Keeping Mail Secret (Building Internet Firewalls)
semicolon (;) starting comments: 4.2.2. Comments (DNS and Bind)
4.3. Setting Up a BIND Configuration File (DNS and Bind)
A.1. Master File Format (DNS and Bind)
E.5.4. ; and # (4.9+) (DNS and Bind)
in resolv.conf file: 6.1.7. Comments (DNS and Bind)
send command (dip): 6.3.2. Dial-Up PPP (TCP/IP Network Administration)
A.1.1. The dip Script File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
send (gated): B.4. Trace Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
send queues, displaying with netstat: 2.1.3. netstat (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
send utilization (If%util): A. Using Input and Output Octets (Essential SNMP)
sendbuffer parameter (gated): B.8.4. The bgp Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Sender fields (sendmail): 10.5.8. Defining Mailers (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sending email with telnet: 10.1.1. Email (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
sending traps: 10.3. Sending Traps (Essential SNMP)
Cisco devices: 7.3.6.2. Advanced configuration (Essential SNMP)
forcing: 10.3.5. Forcing Your Hardware to Generate Traps (Essential SNMP)
hooks in programs: 10.3.6. Using Hooks with Your Programs (Essential SNMP)
Net-SNMP: 10.3.4. Sending Traps with Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
F.2.2.3. Sending SNMPv3 traps with Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
OpenView: 10.3.1. Sending Traps with OpenView (Essential SNMP)
Perl: 10.3.2. Sending Traps with Perl (Essential SNMP)
SNMPv3: F.1.2. SNMPv3 Applications (Essential SNMP)
F.2.2.3. Sending SNMPv3 traps with Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
testing: 10.3.5. Forcing Your Hardware to Generate Traps (Essential SNMP)
Trap Generator: 10.3.3. Sending Traps with Network Computing Technologies Trap Generator (Essential SNMP)
Sendmail: 2.3.1. Electronic Mail (Building Internet Firewalls)
2.3.1. Electronic Mail (Building Internet Firewalls)
3.1. Least Privilege (Building Internet Firewalls)
16.2.7. Sendmail (Building Internet Firewalls)
Morris worm: 13.2.2. What Data Does the Protocol Transfer? (Building Internet Firewalls)
13.2.3.1. Does it have any other commands in it? (Building Internet Firewalls)
sendmail process
checking running processes: 11.1. Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
monitoring: 7.3.5.2. Advanced configuration (Essential SNMP)
sendmail.cf file: 6.3.2. Electronic Mail (DNS and Bind)
6.3.3. Updating .rhosts, hosts.equiv, etc. (DNS and Bind)
configuring: E.4. More sendmail.cf (TCP/IP Network Administration)
creating with m4 macros: 10.4.1.1. Building a sendmail.cf with m4 macros (TCP/IP Network Administration)
modifying
local information: 10.7.1. Modifying Local Information (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Options section: 10.7.2. Modifying Options (TCP/IP Network Administration)
overview: 10.7. Modifying a sendmail.cf File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
overview: 10.4. The sendmail.cf File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
samples: 10.4.1. Locating a Sample sendmail.cf File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
structure: 10.4.2. General sendmail.cf Structure (TCP/IP Network Administration)
testing: 10.8. Testing sendmail.cf (TCP/IP Network Administration)
testing rewrite rules: 10.8.1. Testing Rewrite Rules (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sendport command: 11.2.5.3. FTP with the default data ports (SSH, The Secure Shell)
sendto() system calls: 7.6.2.1. BIND 4.9 and 8 statistics (DNS and Bind)
Sequence Number field, TCP headers: 1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sequence numbers, for one-time password systems: 5.5.1.10. S/Key authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
sequence (sendmail K command value): E.4.5. The sendmail K Command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sequence space arithmetic: 7.2.3. Starting Over with a New Serial Number (DNS and Bind)
Sergey Okhapkin (see Okhapkin's SSH1)
serial connections with crossover cables: 3.2. Testing Adapters (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
serial counters in servers: 10.1.4.1. nslookup and dig (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Serial Line IP protocol, BSD Unix support: 5.1.5.2. The pseudo-device statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
serial lines
connections, troubleshooting: 6.3.7. Troubleshooting Serial Connections (TCP/IP Network Administration)
overview: 6.2. TCP/IP Over a Serial Line (TCP/IP Network Administration)
protocols, SLIP: 6.2.1. The Serial Protocols (TCP/IP Network Administration)
speed: A. Using Input and Output Octets (Essential SNMP)
serial numbers: 4.8.4. Multiple Master Servers (DNS and Bind)
dynamic update and: 10.2.1. Dynamic Update and Serial Numbers (DNS and Bind)
incrementing: 7.2.2. SOA Serial Numbers (DNS and Bind)
nslookup and: 12.1.4. Zone Transfers (DNS and Bind)
of equipment: 1.3.1. Documentation (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
setting new: 7.2.3. Starting Over with a New Serial Number (DNS and Bind)
SOA serial# message and: 7.6.1. Common Syslog Messages (DNS and Bind)
unincremented: 14.3.1. Forgot to Increment Serial Number (DNS and Bind)
14.3.1. Forgot to Increment Serial Number (DNS and Bind)
for zone data: 4.8.3. SOA Values (DNS and Bind)
serial ports, troubleshooting: 6.3.7. Troubleshooting Serial Connections (TCP/IP Network Administration)
serial-queries option (named): C.2.5. The options Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
serial-queries substatement: 10.12.2.6. Limiting the number of SOA queries (DNS and Bind)
SErr statistic: 7.6.2.1. BIND 4.9 and 8 statistics (DNS and Bind)
server
AAA: 21. Authentication and Auditing Services (Building Internet Firewalls)
caching: 15.3.4. Proxying Characteristics of HTTP (Building Internet Firewalls)
15.5. Cache Communication Protocols (Building Internet Firewalls)
database, locating: 23.1.1. Locating Database Servers (Building Internet Firewalls)
DNS
for internal hosts: 20.1.5.2. Set up a real DNS server on an internal system for internal hosts to use (Building Internet Firewalls)
setting up fake: 20.1.5.1. Set up a "fake" DNS server on the bastion host for the outside world to use (Building Internet Firewalls)
FTP, preventing attacks from: 17.1.4.3. Preventing people from using your server to attack other machines (Building Internet Firewalls)
HTTP: 15.3.2. Special HTTP Servers (Building Internet Firewalls)
security of: 15.1. HTTP Server Security (Building Internet Firewalls)
KDC: 21.5.1. How It Works (Building Internet Firewalls)
mail, evaluating: 16.1.2.1. Junk mail (Building Internet Firewalls)
proxy (see proxy services)
routed: 11.3.4.5. routed (Building Internet Firewalls)
SMB authentication: 21.6.4. SMB Authentication (Building Internet Firewalls)
SMTP
for Windows NT: 16.2.13. SMTP Servers for Windows NT (Building Internet Firewalls)
commercial: 16.2.9. Commercial SMTP Servers for Unix (Building Internet Firewalls)
freely available: 16.2.8. Other Freely Available SMTP Servers for Unix (Building Internet Firewalls)
SSH, authentication: 18.2.5.2. SSH server authentication (Building Internet Firewalls)
TIS FWTK authentication: 21.4.1. The TIS FWTK Authentication Server (Building Internet Firewalls)
web: 2.2.2. Web Server Security Issues (Building Internet Firewalls)
Windows Browser: 20.4. The Windows Browser (Building Internet Firewalls)
WINS, communication among: 20.3.4. WINS Server-Server Communication (Building Internet Firewalls)
wuarchive: 17.1.4.4. Using the wuarchive FTP daemon (Building Internet Firewalls)
server authentication: 3.1.3. Authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
3.4.1. Establishing the Secure Connection (SSH, The Secure Shell)
server command (nslookup): 12.5.3. Switching Name Servers (DNS and Bind)
bogus servers and: 10.11. Avoiding a Bogus Name Server (DNS and Bind)
server configuration
per-account: 8. Per-Account Server Configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
three levels of: 0.4. Our Approach (SSH, The Secure Shell)
server executable, finding location of in manual pages: 4.7.1. Starting Up the Name Server (DNS and Bind)
server field
chap-secrets file: 6.3.4. PPP Daemon Security (TCP/IP Network Administration)
inet.conf file: 5.3. The Internet Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
server-identifier parameter (dhcpd): D.3.2. Configuration Parameters (TCP/IP Network Administration)
server keys: 3.3. The Architecture of an SSH System (SSH, The Secure Shell)
generating: 5.4.4. Server Key Generation (SSH, The Secure Shell)
recommended settings for: 10.3.2. /etc/sshd_config (SSH, The Secure Shell)
Server Message Block (SMB): and Server Message Block (SMB) (Building Internet Firewalls) 14.4. Common Internet File System (CIFS)
3.5.1. File Sharing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
server-name parameter (dhcpd): D.3.2. Configuration Parameters (TCP/IP Network Administration)
server names: 5.1. The Name of the Server (SSH, The Secure Shell)
server only NIS: 3.1. Masters, slaves, and clients (Managing NFS and NIS)
server response time, threshold value: 16.2. Measuring performance (Managing NFS and NIS)
Server Selection (SRV) records: C.3.1.11. Server Selection record (TCP/IP Network Administration)
server setting (smb.config file): 9.3.1. Configuring a Samba Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
server-side caching: 7.4.3. Server-side caching (Managing NFS and NIS)
server-side configuration, PC/NFS: 10.3.1. Server-side PC/NFS configuration (Managing NFS and NIS)
server-side fields (RPC), statistics: 14.2. NFS statistics (Managing NFS and NIS)
Server Side Includes (see SSI)
server-side performance tuning: 16. Server-Side Performance Tuning (Managing NFS and NIS)
benchmarking: 16.3. Benchmarking (Managing NFS and NIS)
server statement (named.conf file): C.2.4. The server Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
server string parameter (smb.config file): 9.3.1. Configuring a Samba Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
server threads: 7.2.1. NFS RPC procedures (Managing NFS and NIS)
7.3.3. NFS kernel code (Managing NFS and NIS)
NFS: 7.3.1. nfsd and NFS server threads (Managing NFS and NIS)
server-to-client relationships, trusted hosts and users: 12.1.1. Trusted hosts and trusted users (Managing NFS and NIS)
server-to-server relationships, trusted hosts and users: 12.1.1. Trusted hosts and trusted users (Managing NFS and NIS)
ServerAdmin defines (httpd.conf file): 11.3.2. Basic Configuration Directives (TCP/IP Network Administration)
ServerAdmin values (Apache), changing (Solaris): 11.2.1. Configuring Apache on Solaris (TCP/IP Network Administration)
ServerKeyBits: 5.4.4. Server Key Generation (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ServerName (httpd.conf file): 11.3.2. Basic Configuration Directives (TCP/IP Network Administration)
ServerRoot directive (httpd.conf file): 11.3.2. Basic Configuration Directives (TCP/IP Network Administration)
servers: 3.3. The Architecture of an SSH System (SSH, The Secure Shell)
4.3.5. Compilation Flags (SSH, The Secure Shell)
11. Configuring Apache (TCP/IP Network Administration)
allocating, domains: 4.1.3. Number of NIS servers per domain (Managing NFS and NIS)
caching-only: 8.1.1. BIND Configurations (TCP/IP Network Administration)
configuration: 8.3.1.1. A caching-only server configuration (TCP/IP Network Administration)
checking email servers: 10.1.1. Email (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
checking FTP performance: 10.1.3. FTP and TFTP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
checking HTTP servers: 10.1.2. HTTP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
as clients: 3.3.11. NIS server as an NIS client (Managing NFS and NIS)
compensation, slow: 18.1. Slow server compensation (Managing NFS and NIS)
configuration: 3.6. Configuration Servers (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DHCP: 3.6.2. Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
diskless clients: 8. Diskless Clients (Managing NFS and NIS)
RARP: 3.6.1. Reverse Address Resolution Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
RPCs and: 1.5.3. Internet and RPC server configuration (Managing NFS and NIS)
configuration files: 5.3.1. Server Configuration Files (SSH, The Secure Shell)
CPU loading, bottlenecks and: 16.4.1. Problem areas (Managing NFS and NIS)
debugging: 12.1.2. Server Debugging (SSH, The Secure Shell)
10.1. Application-Protocols Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
disk bandwidth: 16.4.1. Problem areas (Managing NFS and NIS)
disk-space checking script: 12.5. Disk-Space Checker (Essential SNMP)
distributed, management: 9.6. Managing Distributed Servers (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DNS: 5.2.3. Run DNS on NIS clients and servers (Managing NFS and NIS)
DNS, authoritative: 3.3. DNS (TCP/IP Network Administration)
graphing parameters: 13.3. Graphing Other Objects (Essential SNMP)
IMAP
configuring: 9.7.2. IMAP Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
testing: 3.4.3. Internet Message Access Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
listing open files: 2.1.4. lsof (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
load, buffer size and: 18.3. Adjusting for network reliability problems (Managing NFS and NIS)
locating, binding the domain: 3.3.10. The ypbind daemon (Managing NFS and NIS)
log files: 14.6.1. NFS server logging mechanics (Managing NFS and NIS)
logging: 5.8. History, Logging, and Debugging (SSH, The Secure Shell)
configuration: 14.6.3. NFS server logging configuration (Managing NFS and NIS)
configuration files: 14.6.3. NFS server logging configuration (Managing NFS and NIS)
disabling: 14.6.9. Disabling NFS server logging (Managing NFS and NIS)
enabling: 14.6.2. Enabling NFS server logging (Managing NFS and NIS)
mail: 4.5.3. Planning Your Mail System (TCP/IP Network Administration)
mail servers, monitoring: 12.6. Port Monitor (Essential SNMP)
master name: 8.1.1. BIND Configurations (TCP/IP Network Administration)
configuration: 8.3.1.2. Master and slave server configurations (TCP/IP Network Administration)
master server
creating: 3.2.2. Installing the NIS master server (Managing NFS and NIS)
hosts, changing: 4.3.2. Changing NIS master servers (Managing NFS and NIS)
number of: 3.2.2. Installing the NIS master server (Managing NFS and NIS)
unavailable: 3.2.2. Installing the NIS master server (Managing NFS and NIS)
ypxfr tool: 4.2.2. Regular map transfers (Managing NFS and NIS)
memory usage, bottlenecks: 16.4.1. Problem areas (Managing NFS and NIS)
multihomed: 16.5.7. Multihomed servers (Managing NFS and NIS)
name, classifications: 3.3.4. BIND, Resolvers, and named (TCP/IP Network Administration)
name servers: 10.1.4.1. nslookup and dig (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
10.1.4.2. doc, dnswalk, and lamers (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
network interface, bottlenecks: 16.4.1. Problem areas (Managing NFS and NIS)
NFS: 9.1. The Network File System (TCP/IP Network Administration)
10.1.6. NFS (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
B.1. NFS server problems (Managing NFS and NIS)
NIS
selecting: 3.2.1. Choosing NIS servers (Managing NFS and NIS)
testing: 3.2.2. Installing the NIS master server (Managing NFS and NIS)
NLM crash: 11.2.2.1. Server crash (Managing NFS and NIS)
performance tuning: 16.5. Server tuning (Managing NFS and NIS)
buffers: 16.5.3. Memory usage (Managing NFS and NIS)
CPU loading: 16.5.1. CPU loading (Managing NFS and NIS)
cross-mounting filesystem: 16.5.6. Cross-mounting filesystems (Managing NFS and NIS)
kernel configuration: 16.5.5. Kernel configuration (Managing NFS and NIS)
memory usage: 16.5.3. Memory usage (Managing NFS and NIS)
multhomed: 16.5.7. Multihomed servers (Managing NFS and NIS)
nfsd threads: 16.5.2. NFS server threads (Managing NFS and NIS)
throughput: 16.5.4. Disk and filesystem throughput (Managing NFS and NIS)
polling: 12.5. Disk-Space Checker (Essential SNMP)
12.5. Disk-Space Checker (Essential SNMP)
POP, configuring: 9.7.1. POP Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
PPP, configuring: 6.3.5. PPP Server Configuration (TCP/IP Network Administration)
proxy servers: 10.3. Sending Traps (Essential SNMP)
renegade, debugging case study: 15.2. Renegade NIS server (Managing NFS and NIS)
replication, automounter: 9.5.1. Replicated servers (Managing NFS and NIS)
response time
disk-intensive activity and: 16.2. Measuring performance (Managing NFS and NIS)
users and: 16.2. Measuring performance (Managing NFS and NIS)
root: 3.3.1. The Domain Hierarchy (TCP/IP Network Administration)
cache initialization files: 8.3.4. The Cache Initialization File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
root privileges: 12.3.1. Managing the root password with NIS (Managing NFS and NIS)
RPC
configuration: 1.5.3. Internet and RPC server configuration (Managing NFS and NIS)
initialization: 1.5.3. Internet and RPC server configuration (Managing NFS and NIS)
Samba, configuring: 9.3.1. Configuring a Samba Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
serial counters: 10.1.4.1. nslookup and dig (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
slave: 8.1.1. BIND Configurations (TCP/IP Network Administration)
configuration: 8.3.1.2. Master and slave server configurations (TCP/IP Network Administration)
slave server
adding: 3.2. Basics of NIS management (Managing NFS and NIS)
adding later: 3.2.3.1. Adding slave servers later (Managing NFS and NIS)
initializing: 3.2.3. Installing NIS slave servers (Managing NFS and NIS)
installing: 3.2.3. Installing NIS slave servers (Managing NFS and NIS)
listing: 3.2.3. Installing NIS slave servers (Managing NFS and NIS)
removing: 4.3.1. Removing an NIS slave server (Managing NFS and NIS)
slow
testing: 18.1.1. Identifying NFS retransmissions (Managing NFS and NIS)
timeo parameter and: 18.1.2. Timeout period calculation (Managing NFS and NIS)
stack fingerprinting and: 6.3.1. Stack Fingerprinting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
stratum 1 and 2 servers: 11.3. NTP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
synchronizing clocks on: 11.3. NTP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
TCP/IP networks compared to PC LAN servers: 3. Network Services (TCP/IP Network Administration)
terminal servers: 16.5.1. CPU loading (Managing NFS and NIS)
troubleshooting name services: 10.1.4.1. nslookup and dig (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
usage guage: 4.1.3. Number of NIS servers per domain (Managing NFS and NIS)
vnc servers: 11.1.2. vnc (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
11.1.2. vnc (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
web servers: 7.3.5.2. Advanced configuration (Essential SNMP)
B.4. Using NNM for Communications (Essential SNMP)
zone authority records: 10.1.4.1. nslookup and dig (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
10.1.4.1. nslookup and dig (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
ServerType directive (httpd.conf file): 11.3.2. Basic Configuration Directives (TCP/IP Network Administration)
serverwide configuration: 0.4. Our Approach (SSH, The Secure Shell)
4.1.5. Compile-Time Configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
5. Serverwide Configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
10.3. Serverwide Configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
command-line options: 5.3.2. Command-Line Options (SSH, The Secure Shell)
files, commenting: 5.3.1. Server Configuration Files (SSH, The Secure Shell)
modifying: 5.3.3. Changing the Configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
port forwarding: 9.2.10.2. Serverwide configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
precedence rules: 5.3.2. Command-Line Options (SSH, The Secure Shell)
5.3.4. A Tricky Reconfiguration Example (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SERVFAIL errors: 14.3.3. Slave Name Server Can't Load Zone Data (DNS and Bind)
SERVFAIL responses: 7.6.2.1. BIND 4.9 and 8 statistics (DNS and Bind)
service contracts: 1.3.1. Documentation (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
1.3.2.4. Economic considerations (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
B.1. Sources of Information (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Service Control Manager (see SCM)
service extensions, SMTP: 3.4.4. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Service field, NFS log record: 14.6. NFS server logging (Managing NFS and NIS)
service packs, services and: 12.5. Installing and Modifying Services (Building Internet Firewalls)
services: 13. Internet Services and Firewalls (Building Internet Firewalls)
booting, on Unix: 11.3.4.3. Booting services (Building Internet Firewalls)
fir commands: 11.3.4.4. BSD "r" command services (Building Internet Firewalls)
started by /etc/rc: 11.3.1.1. Services started by /etc/rc files or directories (Building Internet Firewalls)
automatically starting services: 2.1.1. ps (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
biff: 16.2.11. biff (Building Internet Firewalls)
contacting providers about incidents: 27.1.5.3. Vendors and service providers (Building Internet Firewalls)
27.4.4.3. Vendors and service providers (Building Internet Firewalls)
differential growth and: 12.2.2.3. Capacity planning (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
disabling those not required: 10.10. Disabling Nonrequired Services (Building Internet Firewalls)
on Unix/Linux: 11.3.2. Disabling Services Under Unix (Building Internet Firewalls)
11.3.4. Specific Unix Services to Disable (Building Internet Firewalls)
on Windows NT: 12.4.2. How to Disable Services Under Windows NT (Building Internet Firewalls)
12.4.5. Specific Windows NT Services to Disable (Building Internet Firewalls)
displaying for hosts: 2.1.3. netstat (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
essential
on Unix/Linux: 11.3.3. Which Services Should You Leave Enabled? (Building Internet Firewalls)
on Windows NT: 12.4.4. Which Services Should You Leave Enabled? (Building Internet Firewalls)
evaluating risks of: 13.2.1. What Operations Does the Protocol Allow? (Building Internet Firewalls)
filtering traffic: 5.4.2.4.2. Protocol and port filtering. (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
information lookup: 20.7. Information Lookup Services (Building Internet Firewalls)
installing and modifying: 10.10.5. Installing and Modifying Services (Building Internet Firewalls)
on Windows NT: 12.5. Installing and Modifying Services (Building Internet Firewalls)
on Unix/Linux: 11.4. Installing and Modifying Services (Building Internet Firewalls)
LAN-oriented: 10.6. Selecting Services Provided by a Bastion Host (Building Internet Firewalls)
management of, on Unix/Linux: 11.3.1. How Are Services Managed Under Unix? (Building Internet Firewalls)
network management (see network, management services)
protecting with TCP Wrapper: 11.4.1. Using the TCP Wrapper Package to Protect Services (Building Internet Firewalls)
protecting with tcpwrappers tool: 11.2.3.1. tcpwrappers (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
proxy (see proxy services)
real-time conferencing: 19. Real-Time Conferencing Services (Building Internet Firewalls)
registry keys for: 12.4.1.1. Registry keys (Building Internet Firewalls)
run levels and: 2.2.4. Startup Files and Scripts (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
selecting for bastion host: 10.6. Selecting Services Provided by a Bastion Host (Building Internet Firewalls)
types of in packets: 5.6.1.1. Using ethereal (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
waiting for connection requests: 2.1.3. netstat (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Windows NT: 12.4.1. How Are Services Managed Under Windows NT? (Building Internet Firewalls)
services file, NIS map: 9.4. Network Information Service (TCP/IP Network Administration)
session identifiers: 3.4.1. Establishing the Secure Connection (SSH, The Secure Shell)
session keys: 12.5.4.8. Establishing a session key (Managing NFS and NIS)
3.3. The Architecture of an SSH System (SSH, The Secure Shell)
3.5.1.2. Session key exchange and the server key (SSH, The Secure Shell)
double-encryption: 3.4.1. Establishing the Secure Connection (SSH, The Secure Shell)
generation by client: 3.4.1. Establishing the Secure Connection (SSH, The Secure Shell)
session layer (7-layer model): 1.5. The session and presentation layers (Managing NFS and NIS)
Session Layer (OSI Model): 1.2. A Data Communications Model (TCP/IP Network Administration)
1.2. A Data Communications Model (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sessions: 3.3. The Architecture of an SSH System (SSH, The Secure Shell)
client-server key exchange, SSH-2: 3.5.1.2. Session key exchange and the server key (SSH, The Secure Shell)
rekeying for improved security: 3.5.1.7. Session rekeying (SSH, The Secure Shell)
set all command (nslookup): 14.3.11. Syntax Error in resolv.conf (DNS and Bind)
14.7.1. Local Name Can't Be Looked Up (DNS and Bind)
set command (nslookup): 12.3. Option Settings (DNS and Bind)
set operations: 2.6.4. The set Operation (Essential SNMP)
8. Polling and Setting (Essential SNMP)
creating text files with: 11.3. OpenView's Extensible Agent (Essential SNMP)
error messages: 2.6.5. get, get-next, get-bulk, and set Error Responses (Essential SNMP)
8.4. Error Responses (Essential SNMP)
Net-SNMP: C.3.5. snmpset (Essential SNMP)
Perl: E.2.4. snmpset( ) (Essential SNMP)
setting and confirming values: 8.3. Setting a MIB Value (Essential SNMP)
SNMP compatibility and: 4.1. What Does SNMP-Compatible Really Mean? (Essential SNMP)
SNMPv3: F.1.2. SNMPv3 Applications (Essential SNMP)
SystemEDGE output requirements: 11.2.1. Extensibility for Unix and Windows NT (Essential SNMP)
updating tables: 11.3.1. Tables (Essential SNMP)
set option command (sendmail): 10.5.4. Setting Options (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SetEnvIf directive (Apache): 11.4.5. Using Encryption (TCP/IP Network Administration)
setgid files, share command and: 9.1.2.1. The share command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
setgid/setuid capabilities: 11. Unix and Linux Bastion Hosts (Building Internet Firewalls)
SET_REQUEST messages (SNMP): 7.1. Overview of SNMP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
7.2.1.1. snmpget (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
7.2.1.4. snmpset (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
setrlimit() system calls, cannot set resource limits message and: 7.6.1. Common Syslog Messages (DNS and Bind)
Sets in filters: 6.1.5. Using OpenView Filters (Essential SNMP)
6.1.5.1. Sets (Essential SNMP)
setting up
BIND configuration file: 4.3. Setting Up a BIND Configuration File (DNS and Bind)
slave name servers: 4.8.1. Setup (DNS and Bind)
setting values with scotty (SNMP): 7.2.2. scotty (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
setuid
executables, security and: 12.4.2. Superuser mapping (Managing NFS and NIS)
root privileges, remote files and: 12.4.2. Superuser mapping (Managing NFS and NIS)
client, security risks under SSH1: 3.5.2.3. Setuid client (SSH, The Secure Shell)
files, share command and: 9.1.2.1. The share command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
programs: 4.1.5.2. Installation, files, and directories (SSH, The Secure Shell)
setup
diskless clients: 8.2. Setting up a diskless client (Managing NFS and NIS)
NFS: 6.1. Setting up NFS (Managing NFS and NIS)
setup packets: 5.4.2.4.3. Packet characteristics. (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
severities, list of: 7.5. Logging in BIND 8 and 9 (DNS and Bind)
severity levels of events (OpenView): 10.2.2.3. Forwarding events and event severities (Essential SNMP)
SFail statistic: 7.6.2.1. BIND 4.9 and 8 statistics (DNS and Bind)
SFErr statistic: 7.6.2.1. BIND 4.9 and 8 statistics (DNS and Bind)
SFS benchmarking tool: 10.1.6. NFS (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
sftp2 error messages: 12.2.5.5. sftp2 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
sftp2, regular expressions: A. SSH2 Manpage for sshregex (SSH, The Secure Shell)
sftp protocol: 3.8. SSH and File Transfers (scp and sftp) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
sftp-server: 3.8. SSH and File Transfers (scp and sftp) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
sftp (SSH2): 2.7.1. sftp (SSH, The Secure Shell)
: 12.2.6. Secure Shell (TCP/IP Network Administration)
3.8.2. scp2/sftp Details (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ASCII vs. binary transfer: 2.7.1. sftp (SSH, The Secure Shell)
command-line options: 2.7.1. sftp (SSH, The Secure Shell)
vs. ftp: 2.7.1. sftp (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SFwdQ statistic: 7.6.2.1. BIND 4.9 and 8 statistics (DNS and Bind)
SFwdR statistic: 7.6.2.1. BIND 4.9 and 8 statistics (DNS and Bind)
SGMP (Simple Gateway Management Protocol): 1.1. Network Management and Monitoring (Essential SNMP)
SHA-1 (Secure Hash Algorithm): 3.9.3.3. SHA-1 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SHA algorithm: F.1.1. The SNMPv3 Engine (Essential SNMP)
F.2.1. Configuring SNMPv3 for a Cisco Router (Essential SNMP)
shadow files: 4.3.5. Compilation Flags (SSH, The Secure Shell)
shadow namespace: 11.3.5. A Split Namespace (DNS and Bind)
shadow password files: 12.2.1. The Shadow Password File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
share command: 6.2. Exporting filesystems (Managing NFS and NIS)
enabling logging: 14.6.1. NFS server logging mechanics (Managing NFS and NIS)
exporting filesystems and: 6.2.2. Exporting options (Managing NFS and NIS)
options: 9.1.2.1. The share command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
persistence: 9.1.2.1. The share command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
share setting (smb.config file): 9.3.1. Configuring a Samba Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
share utility, /etc/dfs/sharetab and: 14.1. NFS administration tools (Managing NFS and NIS)
shared media networks: 13.4.4. Subdividing an Ethernet (TCP/IP Network Administration)
shared-network statement (dhcpd): D.3.1. Topology Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sharing files: 2.4. File Transfer, File Sharing, and Printing (Building Internet Firewalls)
2.4.2. File Sharing (Building Internet Firewalls)
17.3. Network File System (NFS) (Building Internet Firewalls)
on Microsoft networks: 17.4. File Sharing for Microsoft Networks (Building Internet Firewalls)
sharp sign (#)
automounter comments: 9.1.4. NFS Automounter (TCP/IP Network Administration)
comments: 3.2. The Host Table (TCP/IP Network Administration)
comments in host table: 3.2. The Host Table (TCP/IP Network Administration)
inittab file: 5.2.1.1. Understanding /etc/inittab (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SHA/SHA-1 algorithms: C.5.3. Cryptographic Hashes and Message Digests (Building Internet Firewalls)
shell command
dip: A.1.1. The dip Script File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
security: 12.5.1.2. Defining an optional shell command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SHELL environment variable: 2.5. The SSH Agent (SSH, The Secure Shell)
shell escapes, from within forced commands: 8.2.4.1. Security issues (SSH, The Secure Shell)
shell files, security considerations: 12.4.2. Looking for Trouble (TCP/IP Network Administration)
shell profiles: 12.2. Who's Logging into My Machine? (I-Am-in) (Essential SNMP)
shell script programming: 15.1. Shell Script Programming with nslookup (DNS and Bind)
shell scripts: 11.3.1.1. Services started by /etc/rc files or directories (Building Internet Firewalls)
checking file types: 11.1. Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
dig tool and: 10.1.4.1. nslookup and dig (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
finding files: 11.1. Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
hooks to: 10.3.6. Using Hooks with Your Programs (Essential SNMP)
10.3.6. Using Hooks with Your Programs (Essential SNMP)
internal polling scripts: 9.1. Internal Polling (Essential SNMP)
OpenView: 6.1. HP's OpenView Network Node Manager (Essential SNMP)
sanitize tool: 5.5.1. sanitize (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SystemEDGE: 11.2.1. Extensibility for Unix and Windows NT (Essential SNMP)
tclsh tool: 6.4.1. Tcl/Tk and scotty (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
tcp-reduce tool: 5.5.4. tcp-reduce (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
shortcuts for zone data files: 4.4. Abbreviations (DNS and Bind)
examples illustrating: 4.4.4. The Shortened Zone Data Files (DNS and Bind)
.shosts: 3.4.2.3.1. Trusted-host access files (SSH, The Secure Shell)
5.5.2.4. shosts access control (SSH, The Secure Shell)
access control: 5.5.2.4. shosts access control (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ownership: 10.1. The Basics (SSH, The Secure Shell)
permissions: 5.4.2.1. Acceptable permissions for user files (SSH, The Secure Shell)
syntax: 3.4.2.3.2. Control file details (SSH, The Secure Shell)
shosts.equiv file: 3.4.2.3.1. Trusted-host access files (SSH, The Secure Shell)
5.5.2.4. shosts access control (SSH, The Secure Shell)
syntax: 3.4.2.3.2. Control file details (SSH, The Secure Shell)
show-password option (pppd): A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
showmount command: 13.3.1.1. Identifying RPC services (Managing NFS and NIS)
14.1. NFS administration tools (Managing NFS and NIS)
9.1.3. Mounting Remote Filesystems (TCP/IP Network Administration)
showwarnings parameter (gated): B.8.4. The bgp Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
shuffle address records: 10.7. Round Robin Load Distribution (DNS and Bind)
shutdown scripts: 2.2.4. Startup Files and Scripts (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
shutting down
interfaces: 2.1.5. ifconfig (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
routers: 7.3.6.2. Advanced configuration (Essential SNMP)
systems: 27.1.3. Disconnect or Shut Down, as Appropriate (Building Internet Firewalls)
27.4.3. Planning for Disconnecting or Shutting Down Machines (Building Internet Firewalls)
sibling nodes, domain name labels and: 2.1.1. Domain Names (DNS and Bind)
SIG record: 11.4.3. The SIG Record (DNS and Bind)
sig-validity-interval (named): C.2.5.1. The BIND 9 options statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
siggen checksum tool: 11.4.1. tripwire (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SIGHUP: 5.3.3. Changing the Configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
gated signal processing: B.1.1. Signal Processing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
named signal processing: C.1.1. Signal Processing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pppd signal processing: A.2.1. Signal Processing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SIGILL (named signal processing): C.1.1. Signal Processing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SIGINT
gated signal processing: B.1.1. Signal Processing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
named signal processing: C.1.1. Signal Processing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pppd signal processing: A.2.1. Signal Processing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SIGKILL (gated signal processing): B.1.1. Signal Processing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
signal processing
gated: B.1.1. Signal Processing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
named command: C.1.1. Signal Processing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pppd: A.2.1. Signal Processing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
signals: 7.1. Controlling the Name Server (DNS and Bind)
to primary server, forgetting: 14.3.2. Forgot to Reload Primary Master Name Server (DNS and Bind)
using: 7.1.3. Using Signals (DNS and Bind)
control channels instead of: 7.1. Controlling the Name Server (DNS and Bind)
signatures for devices: 6.3.1. Stack Fingerprinting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
signer: 3.3. The Architecture of an SSH System (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SIGSYS (named signal processing): C.1.1. Signal Processing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SIGTERM
gated signal processing: B.1.1. Signal Processing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
named signal processing: C.1.1. Signal Processing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SIGUSR2
B.1.1. Signal Processing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
named signal processing: C.1.1. Signal Processing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pppd signal processing: A.2.1. Signal Processing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SIGWINCH (named signal processing): C.1.1. Signal Processing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
silent option (pppd): A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SilentDeny: 5.5.2.3. Hostname access control (SSH, The Secure Shell)
recommended settings: 10.3.2. /etc/sshd_config (SSH, The Secure Shell)
Silicon Graphics (see IRIX)
Simple Gateway Management Protocol (SGMP): 1.1. Network Management and Monitoring (Essential SNMP)
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (see SMTP)
1.7. Application Layer (TCP/IP Network Administration)
3.4.1. Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Simple Network Management Protocol (see SNMP)
0. Preface (Essential SNMP)
7.1. Overview of SNMP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP): 11.3. NTP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Simple Public Key Infrastructure (SPKI): C.3.2. Certificates (Building Internet Firewalls)
Simple TCP/IP printing services, disabling: 12.4.5. Specific Windows NT Services to Disable (Building Internet Firewalls)
simple watcher tool: 11.2.2. Log File Management (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SimpleWeb: 1.7. Getting More Information (Essential SNMP)
simplex (gated): B.6. Interface Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
simulations of system performance: 12.2.2. Performance Analysis and Monitoring (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
simulators
animating: 9.2.2. ns and nam (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
benefits: 9.2. Network Emulators and Simulators (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
ns and nam tools: 9.2.2. ns and nam (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
uses: 9.2. Network Emulators and Simulators (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
single-homed devices: 8.2. Retrieving Multiple MIB Values (Essential SNMP)
single-purpose routers: 8.8.2. It Can Be a Single-Purpose Router or a General-Purpose Computer (Building Internet Firewalls)
siphon fingerprinting tool: 6.3.1. Stack Fingerprinting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SITE macro (sendmail): E.3. m4 sendmail Macros (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SITECONFIG macro (sendmail): E.3. m4 sendmail Macros (TCP/IP Network Administration)
size bytes (gated): B.4. Trace Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
size field (lsmod command): 5.1.1. Using Dynamically Loadable Modules (TCP/IP Network Administration)
S/Key
authentication using: 5.5.1.10. S/Key authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
enabling in OpenSSH: 4.3.5. Compilation Flags (SSH, The Secure Shell)
skey command (dip): A.1.1. The dip Script File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
S/Key password program: 21.3.1. One-Time Password Software (Building Internet Firewalls)
S/Key software OTP system: 3.4.2.5. One-time passwords (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SKeyAuthentication: 5.5.1.10. S/Key authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
Skipjack algorithm: C.5.1. Encryption Algorithms (Building Internet Firewalls)
SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center): A.2. Generic Sources (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
slash (/) indicating Unix filesystem root: 1.3. The Domain Name System in a Nutshell (DNS and Bind)
2.1. The Domain Name Space (DNS and Bind)
slave directive: E.2.7. slave (DNS and Bind)
slave name servers: 2.4.2. Types of Name Servers (DNS and Bind)
8.2.3. Partial-Slave Servers (DNS and Bind)
(see also partial-slave name servers)
adding: 8.2.1. Primary Master and Slave Servers (DNS and Bind)
9.4.6. Adding a movie.edu Slave (DNS and Bind)
caution with: 8.2.1. Primary Master and Slave Servers (DNS and Bind)
backups of zone data for, importance of: 4.8.2. Backup Files (DNS and Bind)
checking zone (debugging example): 13.3.6. A Slave Name Server Checking Its Zone (BIND 8, Debug Level 1) (DNS and Bind)
forwarders and: 10.5. Forwarding (DNS and Bind)
loading from other slaves: 8.2.1. Primary Master and Slave Servers (DNS and Bind)
outages and: 8.6.2. Longer Outages (Days) (DNS and Bind)
vs. primary master name server: 4.8. Running a Slave Name Server (DNS and Bind)
reloading, command for: 7.1.1. ndc and controls (BIND 8) (DNS and Bind)
running: 4.8. Running a Slave Name Server (DNS and Bind)
setting up: 4.8.1. Setup (DNS and Bind)
example of: 9.4.3. An fx.movie.edu Slave (DNS and Bind)
starting up: 4.8.1. Setup (DNS and Bind)
automatically: 4.8.1. Setup (DNS and Bind)
testing with nslookup: 4.8.1. Setup (DNS and Bind)
unable to load zone data: 14.3.3. Slave Name Server Can't Load Zone Data (DNS and Bind)
slave servers: 3.1. Masters, slaves, and clients (Managing NFS and NIS)
3.3.4. BIND, Resolvers, and named (TCP/IP Network Administration)
8.1.1. BIND Configurations (TCP/IP Network Administration)
adding: 3.2. Basics of NIS management (Managing NFS and NIS)
adding later: 3.2.3.1. Adding slave servers later (Managing NFS and NIS)
configuring: 8.3.1.2. Master and slave server configurations (TCP/IP Network Administration)
8.3.5. The named.local File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
initializing: 3.2.3. Installing NIS slave servers (Managing NFS and NIS)
installing: 3.2.3. Installing NIS slave servers (Managing NFS and NIS)
listing: 3.2.3. Installing NIS slave servers (Managing NFS and NIS)
removing: 4.3.1. Removing an NIS slave server (Managing NFS and NIS)
slave zones, command for maintaining: 7.1.2. rndc and controls (BIND 9) (DNS and Bind)
sleep 2 command (dip): 6.3.2. Dial-Up PPP (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sleep command (dip): A.1.1. The dip Script File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SLIP END character: 6.2.1. The Serial Protocols (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SLIP ESC character: 6.2.1. The Serial Protocols (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SLIP (Serial Line IP): 6.2.1. The Serial Protocols (TCP/IP Network Administration)
limitations: 6.2.1. The Serial Protocols (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sl4nt syslog tool: A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
slogin (SSH1): 2.7.2. slogin (SSH, The Secure Shell)
slow servers, testing for: 18.1.1. Identifying NFS retransmissions (Managing NFS and NIS)
smail program: 16.2.8.1. smail (Building Internet Firewalls)
smap/smapd programs: 16.2.8.2. Postfix (Building Internet Firewalls)
16.2.10. Improving SMTP Security with smap and smapd (Building Internet Firewalls)
Smart Card service: 12.4.4. Which Services Should You Leave Enabled? (Building Internet Firewalls)
SMB (Server Message Block): and Server Message Block (SMB) (Building Internet Firewalls)
14.4. Common Internet File System (CIFS) and Server Message Block (SMB) (Building Internet Firewalls)
17.4. File Sharing for Microsoft Networks (Building Internet Firewalls)
10.2.1. NFS versus SMB (CIFS) (Managing NFS and NIS)
3.5.1. File Sharing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
authentication: 14.4.1. Authentication and SMB (Building Internet Firewalls)
21.6.4. SMB Authentication (Building Internet Firewalls)
(CIFS) security flavor: 12.2. How secure are NIS and NFS? (Managing NFS and NIS)
SMB (System Messaged Blocks): 6.6. Politics and Security (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
smb.conf file: 9.3.1. Configuring a Samba Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
directory sharing: 9.3.1.2. Sharing directories through Samba (TCP/IP Network Administration)
global section: 9.3.1. Configuring a Samba Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
home section: 9.3.1.1. The smb.conf homes section (TCP/IP Network Administration)
name server configuration: 9.3.2. NetBIOS Name Service (TCP/IP Network Administration)
printer sharing: 9.3.1.3. Sharing printers through Samba (TCP/IP Network Administration)
smbd command: 9.3. Using Samba to Share Resources with Windows (TCP/IP Network Administration)
smbpasswd file: 9.3.1. Configuring a Samba Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SMI (Structure of Management Information): 1.4. The Structure of Management Information and MIBS (Essential SNMP)
7.1. Overview of SNMP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SMI Next Generation (SMING): 2.3.2. Defining OIDs (Essential SNMP)
SMIv2: 2.3. The Structure of Management Information (Essential SNMP)
2.4. Extensions to the SMI in Version 2 (Essential SNMP)
datatypes: 2.4. Extensions to the SMI in Version 2 (Essential SNMP)
object definition enhancements: 2.4. Extensions to the SMI in Version 2 (Essential SNMP)
RFC standards: D.2. SMIv2 Data Definition Language (Essential SNMP)
textual conventions: 2.4. Extensions to the SMI in Version 2 (Essential SNMP)
S/MIME: 16.1.4. S/MIME and OpenPGP (Building Internet Firewalls)
SMIT (System Management Interface Tool): 6.4.4.2. AIX 4.2.1 (DNS and Bind)
SMS (System Management Server): 22.1.3. System Management Server (SMS) (Building Internet Firewalls)
5.8. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
smtp8 mailer: 10.4.1.1. Building a sendmail.cf with m4 macros (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol): 2.3.1. Electronic Mail (Building Internet Firewalls)
10.1.1. Email (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
10.6. Selecting Services Provided by a Bastion Host (Building Internet Firewalls)
16.2. Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) (Building Internet Firewalls)
1.7. Application Layer (TCP/IP Network Administration)
3.4.1. Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
commands: 3.4.1. Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
source code: 3.4.1. Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
viewing: E.2. The sendmail Command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
configuring: 24.2.1.2. SMTP (Building Internet Firewalls)
firewalls and: 16.2.6. Configuring SMTP to Work with a Firewall (Building Internet Firewalls)
in screened subnet architecture: 24.1.1.2. SMTP (Building Internet Firewalls)
ESMTP (Extended SMTP): 3.4.4. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (TCP/IP Network Administration)
private extensions to: 3.4.4. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (TCP/IP Network Administration)
proxying: 9.4. Proxying Without a Proxy Server (Building Internet Firewalls)
sendmail: 10.2. Running sendmail as a Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
required macros: 10.4.1.1. Building a sendmail.cf with m4 macros (TCP/IP Network Administration)
servers
for Windows NT: 16.2.13. SMTP Servers for Windows NT (Building Internet Firewalls)
commercial: 16.2.9. Commercial SMTP Servers for Unix (Building Internet Firewalls)
freely available: 16.2.8. Other Freely Available SMTP Servers for Unix (Building Internet Firewalls)
service extensions: 3.4.4. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (TCP/IP Network Administration)
3.4.4. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (TCP/IP Network Administration)
for Unix (see Sendmail)
SMTP support in devices: 6.2.2. Discovery and Filters (Essential SNMP)
Smurf attacks: 3.3.3.2. Smurf Attacks (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SMUX (SNMP Multiplexing Protocol): 4.5. A Look Ahead (Essential SNMP)
smux statement (gated): B.8.6. The smux Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SNaAns statistic: 7.6.2.1. BIND 4.9 and 8 statistics (DNS and Bind)
snapshots, system: 27.1.6. Snapshot the System (Building Internet Firewalls)
of traffic data: 5.5.8. trafshow (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
planning for: 27.4.5. Planning for Snapshots (Building Internet Firewalls)
sniffers: 1.2.1.3. Information theft (Building Internet Firewalls)
13.1.6. Packet Sniffing (Building Internet Firewalls)
protecting against: 13.1.10. Protecting Services (Building Internet Firewalls)
sniffing for passwords: 21.3.1. One-Time Password Software (Building Internet Firewalls)
SNMP++: 5.5. Supporting Software (Essential SNMP)
SNMP for Perl 5 package: A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SNMP Link: 1.7. Getting More Information (Essential SNMP)
SNMP Manager tool: 6.1.2. Discovery and Mapping Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SNMP MIB Browser (OpenView): 8.1.1. Using HP OpenView to Retrieve Values (Essential SNMP)
8.2.1. Walking the MIB Tree with OpenView (Essential SNMP)
SNMP Multiplexing Protocol (SMUX): 4.5. A Look Ahead (Essential SNMP)
SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol): 2.9.1. System Management (Building Internet Firewalls)
22.1.2. Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) (Building Internet Firewalls)
0. Preface (Essential SNMP)
0. Preface (Essential SNMP)
1. What Is SNMP? (Essential SNMP)
AgentX: 4.5. A Look Ahead (Essential SNMP)
basic operation and structures: 7.1. Overview of SNMP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
before-and-after scenarios: 1.1.1. Before and After SNMP (Essential SNMP)
bilingual agents: 4.1. What Does SNMP-Compatible Really Mean? (Essential SNMP)
books and resources: B.2.3. Specific Protocols (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
compatibility: 4.1. What Does SNMP-Compatible Really Mean? (Essential SNMP)
in bottleneck analysis: 12.2.2.2. Bottleneck analysis (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
communities: 2.2. SNMP Communities (Essential SNMP)
community strings: 6.6. Politics and Security (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
7.1. Overview of SNMP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
compatible or compliant devices: 4.1. What Does SNMP-Compatible Really Mean? (Essential SNMP)
devices lacking support for: 7.2.3.1. ICMP monitoring (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
disabling, on Windows NT: 12.4.5. Specific Windows NT Services to Disable (Building Internet Firewalls)
error messages: 2.6.5. get, get-next, get-bulk, and set Error Responses (Essential SNMP)
examining MIBs with tkined: 7.2.3.3. Examining MIBs (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
FAQs: 1.7. Getting More Information (Essential SNMP)
graphing objects: 8.6.2. getif revisited (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
history: 1. What Is SNMP? (Essential SNMP)
host management: 1.5. Host Management (Essential SNMP)
2.7. Host Management Revisited (Essential SNMP)
information and resources: 1.7. Getting More Information (Essential SNMP)
management groups (MIB-II): 2.5. A Closer Look at MIB-II (Essential SNMP)
managers and agents: 7.1. Overview of SNMP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
MIBs (see MIBs)
Microsoft Windows: 7.4. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
mrtg usage of: 8.4.1. mrtg (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
NET SNMP tool: 7.2. SNMP-Based Management Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
network management: 1.1. Network Management and Monitoring (Essential SNMP)
objects: 7.1. Overview of SNMP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
operations overview: 2.6. SNMP Operations (Essential SNMP)
performance measurements: 8.4. Network-Monitoring Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Perl operations: E.2. SNMP Operations (Essential SNMP)
ports: 6.3. Device Identification (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
in protocol stack: 2.1. SNMP and UDP (Essential SNMP)
remote monitoring (see RMON)
RFC standards: 1.2. RFCs and SNMP Versions (Essential SNMP)
D. SNMP RFCs (Essential SNMP)
RMON extensions: 8.5. RMON (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
scotty tool: 7.2.2. scotty (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
security issues: 7.1. Overview of SNMP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
security weaknesses: 7.2. Security Concerns (Essential SNMP)
F. SNMPv3 (Essential SNMP)
SMI: 1.4. The Structure of Management Information and MIBS (Essential SNMP)
SMIv2: 2.4. Extensions to the SMI in Version 2 (Essential SNMP)
SNMP Manager: 6.1.2. Discovery and Mapping Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
snmp.conf file: 7.2.1.2. Configuration and options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SNMPv3: 7.1. Overview of SNMP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SNMPv2 Classic, v2*, v2c, and v2u: 7.1. Overview of SNMP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
staffing considerations: 1.1.2. Human Considerations (Essential SNMP)
tkined tool: 7.2.3. tkined (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
toasters controlled by: 7.2.1.4. snmpset (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
traps: 7.2.3.2. SNMP traps (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
troubleshooting routing tables: 10.1.5. Routing (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
UDP and: 2.1. SNMP and UDP (Essential SNMP)
versions: 7.1. Overview of SNMP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
(Network Troubleshooting Tools) 7.2.1. NET SNMP (UCD SNMP)
web-based interfaces: 3.3. A Look Ahead (Essential SNMP)
snmpbulkget command (see snmpgetbulk command)
snmpbulkwalk command (Net-SNMP): C.3.4. snmpbulkwalk (Essential SNMP)
SNMPc: 5.2. NMS Suites (Essential SNMP)
configuration: 6.2. Castle Rock's SNMPc Enterprise Edition (Essential SNMP)
installation: 6.2. Castle Rock's SNMPc Enterprise Edition (Essential SNMP)
loading MIBs: 6.2.3. Loading MIBs into SNMPc (Essential SNMP)
node discovery: 6.2.2. Discovery and Filters (Essential SNMP)
seed devices: 6.2. Castle Rock's SNMPc Enterprise Edition (Essential SNMP)
6.2.2. Discovery and Filters (Essential SNMP)
external polling: 9.2.4. Castle Rock's SNMPc (Essential SNMP)
Automatic Alarms: 9.2.4. Castle Rock's SNMPc (Essential SNMP)
customizing menus: 9.2.4. Castle Rock's SNMPc (Essential SNMP)
graphing: 9.2.4. Castle Rock's SNMPc (Essential SNMP)
learning periods: 9.2.4. Castle Rock's SNMPc (Essential SNMP)
thresholds: 9.2.4. Castle Rock's SNMPc (Essential SNMP)
9.2.4. Castle Rock's SNMPc (Essential SNMP)
workgroup and enterprise editions: 9.2.4. Castle Rock's SNMPc (Essential SNMP)
snmpCol.trace file (OpenView): 9.2.3.2. Creating a threshold (Essential SNMP)
snmp.conf file: 7.2.1.2. Configuration and options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
snmpconf utility (Net-SNMP): 7.3.4. Net-SNMP (Formerly UCD-SNMP) (Essential SNMP)
8.1.2. Using Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
C.3.13. snmpconf (Essential SNMP)
snmpd agent: 7.2.1.8. Agents and traps (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
snmpd log files: 7.3.4. Net-SNMP (Formerly UCD-SNMP) (Essential SNMP)
11.3. OpenView's Extensible Agent (Essential SNMP)
snmpd.conf file: 7.2.1.8. Agents and traps (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
snmpdelta command: C.3.7. snmpdelta (Essential SNMP)
snmpdf command (Net-SNMP): C.3.8. snmpdf (Essential SNMP)
snmpdm (OpenView master agent): 11. Extensible SNMP Agents (Essential SNMP)
11.3. OpenView's Extensible Agent (Essential SNMP)
snmpget command: 2.6.1. The get Operation (Essential SNMP)
7.2.1.1. snmpget (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
2.6.1. The get Operation (Essential SNMP)
8. Polling and Setting (Essential SNMP)
E.2.1. snmpget( ) (Essential SNMP)
confirming set commands: 2.6.4. The set Operation (Essential SNMP)
diagnosing SNMP version with: 4.2. Is My Device SNMP-Compatible? (Essential SNMP)
error responses: 8.4. Error Responses (Essential SNMP)
Net-SNMP operations: 8.1.2. Using Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
C.3.2. snmpget (Essential SNMP)
OpenView operations: 8.1.1. Using HP OpenView to Retrieve Values (Essential SNMP)
Perl scripts: 8.1. Retrieving a Single MIB Value (Essential SNMP)
multiple OIDs in: 8.2. Retrieving Multiple MIB Values (Essential SNMP)
snmpgetbulk command: 2.6.3. The get-bulk Operation (Essential SNMP)
2.6.3. The get-bulk Operation (Essential SNMP)
diagnosing SNMP version with: 4.2. Is My Device SNMP-Compatible? (Essential SNMP)
Net-SNMP: C.3.3. snmpbulkget (Essential SNMP)
snmpgetnext command: C.3.9. snmpgetnext (Essential SNMP)
C.3.9. snmpgetnext (Essential SNMP)
(see also get-next operations)
E.2.2. snmpgetnext( ) (Essential SNMP)
7.2.1.1. snmpget (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
7.2.1.3. snmpgetnext, snmpwalk, and snmptable (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
snmpInfo table (SNMPc): 9.2.4. Castle Rock's SNMPc (Essential SNMP)
snmpinform command: C.3.14. snmpinform (Essential SNMP)
snmpLoad_OID_Cache() routine: E.1.3. snmpLoad_OID_Cache( ) (Essential SNMP)
snmpmapOID() routine: E.1.1. snmpmapOID( ) (Essential SNMP)
snmpMIB_to_OID() routine: E.1.2. snmpMIB_to_OID( ) (Essential SNMP)
snmpnetstat utility: 7.2.1.6. snmpnetstat (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
snmpOutPkts object (MIB): 9.2.4. Castle Rock's SNMPc (Essential SNMP)
snmpQueue_MIB_File() routine: E.1.4. snmpQueue_MIB_File( ) (Essential SNMP)
SNMP_Session module: 8.1. Retrieving a Single MIB Value (Essential SNMP)
SNMP_Session.pm extension: 6.4. Scripts (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
snmpset command: 2.6.4. The set Operation (Essential SNMP)
E.2.4. snmpset( ) (Essential SNMP)
7.2.1.1. snmpget (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
7.2.1.4. snmpset (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
2.6.4. The set Operation (Essential SNMP)
8. Polling and Setting (Essential SNMP)
creating text files: 11.3. OpenView's Extensible Agent (Essential SNMP)
error responses: 8.4. Error Responses (Essential SNMP)
Net-SNMP: C.3.5. snmpset (Essential SNMP)
setting and confirming values: 8.3. Setting a MIB Value (Essential SNMP)
updating tables: 11.3.1. Tables (Essential SNMP)
snmpstatus command: C.3.10. snmpstatus (Essential SNMP)
7.2.1.7. snmpstatus (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
snmptable command: C.3.11. snmptable (Essential SNMP)
7.2.1.3. snmpgetnext, snmpwalk, and snmptable (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
7.2.1.5. snmptranslate (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
8.5. RMON (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
snmptranslate utility (Net-SNMP): 8.1.2. Using Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
C.3.15. snmptranslate (Essential SNMP)
snmptrap programs: 10.3. Sending Traps (Essential SNMP)
7.2.1.8. Agents and traps (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
hooks in: 10.3.6. Using Hooks with Your Programs (Essential SNMP)
Net-SNMP: 10.3.4. Sending Traps with Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
C.3.6. snmptrap (Essential SNMP)
OpenView: 10.3.1. Sending Traps with OpenView (Essential SNMP)
snmptrap() routine: 10.3.2. Sending Traps with Perl (Essential SNMP)
(Essential SNMP) E.2.5. snmptrap( )
snmptrapd daemon: 7.2.1.8. Agents and traps (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
snmptrapd utility: 10.2.9. Receiving Traps Using Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
10.3.2. Sending Traps with Perl (Essential SNMP)
snmpusm utility: C.3.12. snmpusm (Essential SNMP)
F.2.2.1. Using snmpusm to manage users (Essential SNMP)
SNMP_util module: 8.1. Retrieving a Single MIB Value (Essential SNMP)
E. SNMP Support for Perl (Essential SNMP)
SNMPv3: 1.2. RFCs and SNMP Versions (Essential SNMP)
applications: F.1.2. SNMPv3 Applications (Essential SNMP)
authentication (see authentication, SNMPv3)
changes in: F.1. Changes in SNMPv3 (Essential SNMP)
Cisco router configuration: F.2.1. Configuring SNMPv3 for a Cisco Router (Essential SNMP)
cloning users: F.2.2.1. Using snmpusm to manage users (Essential SNMP)
copying configuration files: F.2.2. Configuring SNMPv3 for Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
creating users: F.2.1. Configuring SNMPv3 for a Cisco Router (Essential SNMP)
default configurations: F.2.2.2. Simplifying commands by setting defaults (Essential SNMP)
determining compatibility: 4.2. Is My Device SNMP-Compatible? (Essential SNMP)
device support: 4.2. Is My Device SNMP-Compatible? (Essential SNMP)
engine: F.1.1. The SNMPv3 Engine (Essential SNMP)
entities: F.1. Changes in SNMPv3 (Essential SNMP)
F.1.3. What Does an Entity Look Like? (Essential SNMP)
fields: F.2.2.2. Simplifying commands by setting defaults (Essential SNMP)
groups: F.2.1. Configuring SNMPv3 for a Cisco Router (Essential SNMP)
IETF working group site: F.3. Final Words on SNMPv3 (Essential SNMP)
Net-SNMP configuration: 7.3.4.1. Running the configuration script (Essential SNMP)
F.2. Configuring SNMPv3 (Essential SNMP)
OpenSSL: F.2.2. Configuring SNMPv3 for Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
privacy: F.1.1. The SNMPv3 Engine (Essential SNMP)
F.1.4. SNMPv3 Textual Conventions (Essential SNMP)
F.2.2. Configuring SNMPv3 for Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
RFCs: F.1. Changes in SNMPv3 (Essential SNMP)
security (see security)
textual conventions: F.1.4. SNMPv3 Textual Conventions (Essential SNMP)
trap definition: 10.1.1. SNMPv2 Traps (Essential SNMP)
trap generation: F.2.2.3. Sending SNMPv3 traps with Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
views: F.2.1. Configuring SNMPv3 for a Cisco Router (Essential SNMP)
snmpV2 branch: 2.4. Extensions to the SMI in Version 2 (Essential SNMP)
snmpwalk command: 2.6.2. The get-next Operation (Essential SNMP)
E.2.3. snmpwalk( ) (Essential SNMP)
7.2.1.3. snmpgetnext, snmpwalk, and snmptable (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
2.6.2. The get-next Operation (Essential SNMP)
8. Polling and Setting (Essential SNMP)
dangers of overloading systems: 8.2.1. Walking the MIB Tree with OpenView (Essential SNMP)
error responses: 8.4. Error Responses (Essential SNMP)
Net-SNMP: 8.2.2. Walking the Tree with Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
C.3.1. snmpwalk (Essential SNMP)
OpenView: 8.2.1. Walking the MIB Tree with OpenView (Essential SNMP)
11.3. OpenView's Extensible Agent (Essential SNMP)
Perl scripts: 8.2. Retrieving Multiple MIB Values (Essential SNMP)
retrieving disk space: 11.1. Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
RMON event tables: 9.1.1.1. RMON configuration (Essential SNMP)
walking tables: 11.3.1. Tables (Essential SNMP)
11.3.1. Tables (Essential SNMP)
snoop: 13.5.1. snoop (Managing NFS and NIS)
5.5.10. Other Packet Capture Programs (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
14.3. snoop (Managing NFS and NIS)
diagnostic troubleshooting: 13.2. Diagnostic Tools (TCP/IP Network Administration)
filters: 14.3.1. Useful filters (Managing NFS and NIS)
NFS Server Logging utility: 14.6. NFS server logging (Managing NFS and NIS)
troubleshooting protocols: 13.7.1. Packet Filters (TCP/IP Network Administration)
ftp failure: 13.8. Protocol Case Study (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Snort (automated system monitoring): 12.4.3. Automated Monitoring (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SNTP (Simple Network Time Protocol): 11.3. NTP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
sntpd clock tools: 11.3. NTP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
snuffie program: 10.10.1.1. Next steps after disabling services (Building Internet Firewalls)
SNXD statistic: 7.6.2.1. BIND 4.9 and 8 statistics (DNS and Bind)
SOA records (see also Start of Authority records)
3.2.2. Where in the World Do I Fit? (DNS and Bind)
4.2.4. SOA Records (DNS and Bind)
15.1.1. A Typical Problem (DNS and Bind)
A.1.2. Types (DNS and Bind)
@ notation in: 4.4.2. The @ Notation (DNS and Bind)
changing values in: 8.4.1. Changing Other SOA Values (DNS and Bind)
finding for subdomains: 3.2.3.1. The us domain (DNS and Bind)
getting serial numbers for
sample program in C: 15.2.8. A Sample Program: check_soa (DNS and Bind)
sample program in Perl: 15.3.6. A Perl Version of check_soa (DNS and Bind)
incrementing serial numbers and: 7.2.2. SOA Serial Numbers (DNS and Bind)
no NS records for: 14.5.2. Name Server Reports "No NS Record for SOA MNAME" (DNS and Bind)
order of in zone data files: 4.2.1. The Zone Data Files (DNS and Bind)
queries, limiting number of: 10.12.2.6. Limiting the number of SOA queries (DNS and Bind)
query statistics for: 7.6.2.1. BIND 4.9 and 8 statistics (DNS and Bind)
TTL and: 8.4. Changing TTLs (DNS and Bind)
values for: 4.8.3. SOA Values (DNS and Bind)
RFC 1537 recommendation for: 4.8.3. SOA Values (DNS and Bind)
SOA serial# message: 7.6.1. Common Syslog Messages (DNS and Bind)
SOA (Start of Authority) records (see also SOA records)
C.3.1.1. Start of Authority record (TCP/IP Network Administration)
forward-mapping zone files: 8.3.7. The Forward-Mapping Zone File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
named.local file: 8.3.5. The named.local File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
reverse zone files: 8.3.6. The Reverse Zone File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
social manipulation attacks: 2.3.1. Electronic Mail (Building Internet Firewalls)
sock traffic tool: 9.1.1.3. Other tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
socket descriptors: 13.3.1. Name Server Startup (BIND 8, Debug Level 1) (DNS and Bind)
socket options parameter (smb.config file): 9.3.1. Configuring a Samba Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
socket RPC: 1.5.3.1. Socket RPC and Transport Independent RPC (Managing NFS and NIS)
socket TCP tool: 9.1.1.3. Other tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Socket.pm utility: 13.6. Tools (DNS and Bind)
sockets: 9.2.1. Local Forwarding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
1.2. A Data Communications Model (TCP/IP Network Administration)
2.6.3. Sockets (TCP/IP Network Administration)
buffer size: 4.2.3.3. iperf (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
displaying for connections: 2.1.3. netstat (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
snmpnetstat results: 7.2.1.6. snmpnetstat (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
ssh-agent: 6.3.4.1. Access control (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SOCKS: 7.4.6. Proxies and SOCKS (SSH, The Secure Shell)
compile-time configuration: 4.1.5.8. SOCKS proxy support (SSH, The Secure Shell)
configuration flags: 4.1.5.8. SOCKS proxy support (SSH, The Secure Shell)
OpenSSH: 7.4.6.3. SOCKS in OpenSSH (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH1: 7.4.6.1. SOCKS in SSH1 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
trusted-host authentication issues: 7.4.6.4. Other SOCKS issues (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SOCKS package: 5.3. Proxy Services (Building Internet Firewalls)
9.5. Using SOCKS for Proxying (Building Internet Firewalls)
B.4.2. SOCKS (Building Internet Firewalls)
functions: 9.5.4. Converting Clients to Use SOCKS (Building Internet Firewalls)
HTTP proxying on, in screened subnet architecture: 24.1.1.1. HTTP and HTTPS (Building Internet Firewalls)
modified finger service: 20.7.1.2. Proxying characteristics of finger (Building Internet Firewalls)
proxy system for ping: 22.4.1.2. Proxying characteristics of ping (Building Internet Firewalls)
versions: 9.5.1. Versions of SOCKS (Building Internet Firewalls)
SOCKS5_NONETMASKCHECK: 7.4.6.1. SOCKS in SSH1 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SOCKS5_PASSWD: 7.4.6.1. SOCKS in SSH1 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SOCKS_SERVER: 7.4.6.1. SOCKS in SSH1 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SOCKS5_USER: 7.4.6.1. SOCKS in SSH1 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
soft mounts, filesystems: 6.3.5. Hard and soft mounts (Managing NFS and NIS)
soft option (vfstab file): 9.1.3.2. The vfstab and fstab files (TCP/IP Network Administration)
software
BIND
obtaining: 3.1. Getting BIND (DNS and Bind)
C.1.1. Get the Source Code (DNS and Bind)
precompiled: 3.1.1. Handy Mailing Lists and Usenet Newsgroups (DNS and Bind)
choosing hosts and: 8.1.1. Where Do I Put My Name Servers? (DNS and Bind)
connectivity: 3.3. Software Testing with ping (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
firewall: 11.3.1. Types of Firewall Software (DNS and Bind)
installation troubleshooting: 12.2.1. Installation Testing (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
installing on machine: 10.10.6. Reconfiguring for Production (Building Internet Firewalls)
11.5. Reconfiguring for Production (Building Internet Firewalls)
networking, included with Unix operating system: 3.1. Getting BIND (DNS and Bind)
proxying: 5.3. Proxy Services (Building Internet Firewalls)
5.3.2.1. Proxy services lag behind nonproxied services (Building Internet Firewalls)
5.3.2.1. Proxy services lag behind nonproxied services (Building Internet Firewalls)
9.2. How Proxying Works (Building Internet Firewalls)
routers (see routers)
system monitoring: 10.11.2. Consider Using Software to Automate Monitoring (Building Internet Firewalls)
tools (see tools, names of specific tools)
viruses: 1.5.2.4. A firewall can't fully protect against viruses (Building Internet Firewalls)
Solaris (see also Solaris operating system)
AddModule directive, modules referenced: 11.3.1. Loading Dynamic Shared Objects (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Apache
configuring: 11.2.1. Configuring Apache on Solaris (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Directory containers: 11.3.4. Defining Where Things Are Stored (TCP/IP Network Administration)
bootup: 5.1. Kernel Configuration (TCP/IP Network Administration)
broadcast addresses, setting: 6.1.5. Setting the Broadcast Address (TCP/IP Network Administration)
configuration files
command-line option to override location: 11.3.2. Basic Configuration Directives (TCP/IP Network Administration)
syslog.conf: 3.2. The Host Table (TCP/IP Network Administration)
device drivers, installing: 5.1.1. Using Dynamically Loadable Modules (TCP/IP Network Administration)
diskless clients (see diskless clients)
dmesg command: 6.1.1. The Interface Name (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DSO modules: 11.3.1. Loading Dynamic Shared Objects (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dynamically loadable modules: 5.1.1. Using Dynamically Loadable Modules (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Ethernet, ifconfig command: 6.1. The ifconfig Command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
filesystem type, specifying: 9.1.3.1. The mount command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
hostname file: 6.1.3. Assigning an Address (TCP/IP Network Administration)
httpd.conf file: F. Solaris httpd.conf File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
configuration directives: 11.3.2. Basic Configuration Directives (TCP/IP Network Administration)
location: 11.2. Configuring the Apache Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
ifconfig command, syntax: 6.1. The ifconfig Command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
IndexOptions directive (Apache): 11.3.5. Creating a Fancy Index (TCP/IP Network Administration)
kernel configuration: 5.1. Kernel Configuration (TCP/IP Network Administration)
loghost alias: 3.2. The Host Table (TCP/IP Network Administration)
mount command: 6.3.3. Mount options (Managing NFS and NIS)
mountall command: 9.1.3.2. The vfstab and fstab files (TCP/IP Network Administration)
named command, running: 8.3.8. Controlling the named Process (TCP/IP Network Administration)
netmasks file: 6.1.4. Assigning a Subnet Mask (TCP/IP Network Administration)
network interfaces, checking status: 6.1.2. Checking the Interface with ifconfig (TCP/IP Network Administration)
NFS, daemon locations: 9.1.1. NFS Daemons (TCP/IP Network Administration)
NFS, export and: 6.2. Exporting filesystems (Managing NFS and NIS)
physical network address: 3.6.1. Reverse Address Resolution Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
ping command option: 13.3.1. The ping Command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
point-to-point connections, defining: 6.1.6.6. Point-to-point (TCP/IP Network Administration)
PPP, configuring: 6.3.6. Solaris PPP (TCP/IP Network Administration)
printers, configuring: 9.2.2. Line Printer Service (TCP/IP Network Administration)
rc.script files: 6.1.6.7. Putting ifconfig in the startup scripts (TCP/IP Network Administration)
routed command, running: 7.4.1.1. Running RIP with routed (TCP/IP Network Administration)
routing metric, changing: 6.1.6.4. Metric (TCP/IP Network Administration)
routing tables: 2.4. The Routing Table (TCP/IP Network Administration)
runlevels: 5.2.1.1. Understanding /etc/inittab (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sendmail: 10.2. Running sendmail as a Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
serial ports, troubleshooting: 6.3.7. Troubleshooting Serial Connections (TCP/IP Network Administration)
shadow password files: 12.2.1. The Shadow Password File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
share command: 9.1.2.1. The share command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SMTP extensions: 3.4.4. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (TCP/IP Network Administration)
static routing, adding to startup scripts: 7.3.1.1. Installing static routes at startup (TCP/IP Network Administration)
System V startup: 5.2.1.1. Understanding /etc/inittab (TCP/IP Network Administration)
vfstab files, options: 9.1.3.2. The vfstab and fstab files (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Solaris Easy Access Server (SEAS): 8.2. Setting up a diskless client (Managing NFS and NIS)
Solaris operating system (see also Solaris)
agent software: 5.1. SNMP Agents (Essential SNMP)
5.1. SNMP Agents (Essential SNMP)
7.3.5. Concord SystemEDGE Agent for Unix and NT (Essential SNMP)
changing kernel parameters: 2.2.3. Kernel (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
configuration files: 2.2.1. Basic Configuration Files (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
element manager software: 5.3. Element Managers (Vendor-Specific Management) (Essential SNMP)
hooks in programs: 10.3.6. Using Hooks with Your Programs (Essential SNMP)
kernel directives: 2.2.3. Kernel (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
installing packages: A.1.2. Solaris Packages (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
NMS suites: 5.2. NMS Suites (Essential SNMP)
5.2. NMS Suites (Essential SNMP)
5.2. NMS Suites (Essential SNMP)
OpenSSH-incompatible Kerberos-4: 11.4.5.2. Kerberos on Solaris (SSH, The Secure Shell)
OpenView and: 7.3.3. HP OpenView Agent for HP-UX and Solaris (Essential SNMP)
packet capture: 5.5.10. Other Packet Capture Programs (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
ping tools: 3.3.2.1. Simple examples (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
supporting software: 5.5. Supporting Software (Essential SNMP)
trend-analysis software: 5.4. Trend Analysis (Essential SNMP)
vendor-specific software: 5.3. Element Managers (Vendor-Specific Management) (Essential SNMP)
Solaris 2.x, configuring resolvers for: 6.4.2. Sun's Solaris 2.x (DNS and Bind)
SO_LINGER: 4.1.5.3. TCP/IP support (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SO_LINGER socket flag: 4.1.5.3. TCP/IP support (SSH, The Secure Shell)
Solstice AdminSuite tool: 2.2.2. Configuration Programs (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
solstice command: 8.2. Setting up a diskless client (Managing NFS and NIS)
solutions in troubleshooting: 12.1. Generic Troubleshooting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
12.2.2.2. Bottleneck analysis (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
sorting ntop results: 8.3.1.1. Interactive mode (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
8.3.1.2. Web mode (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
sortlist directive: 6.1. The Resolver (DNS and Bind)
8.2.1. The Resolver Configuration File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
6.1.5. The sortlist Directive (DNS and Bind)
10.8.1.2. Remote multihomed hosts (DNS and Bind)
E.2.6. sortlist (DNS and Bind)
E.5.5. sortlist (4.9+) (DNS and Bind)
sortlist entry (resolv.conf file): 8.2.1. The Resolver Configuration File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sortlist option (named): C.2.5. The options Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sortlist substatement: 10.8.2. BIND 8 and 9 Address Sorting (DNS and Bind)
sound files, playing for events: 10.2.2.4. Log messages, notifications, and automatic actions (Essential SNMP)
source address
arbitrary addresses in hping: 9.1.1.1. hping (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
filtering by: 8.6.1. Risks of Filtering by Source Address (Building Internet Firewalls)
forgery: 8.6.1. Risks of Filtering by Source Address (Building Internet Firewalls)
filtering: 5.4.2.4.1. Address filtering. (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
nemesis settings: 9.1.1.2. nemesis (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
source code
for BIND, obtaining: 3.1. Getting BIND (DNS and Bind)
C.1.1. Get the Source Code (DNS and Bind)
comments in: B.1. Sources of Information (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
downloading: A.1.1. Generic Installs (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
map files: 4.2.5. Source code control for map files (Managing NFS and NIS)
source code control system (see SCCS)
source field (RIPE database): 4.2.1.2. Obtaining an IN-ADDR.ARPA domain (TCP/IP Network Administration)
source files
domain, pushing to new: 4.4. Managing multiple domains (Managing NFS and NIS)
maps: 4.2.1. Map distribution (Managing NFS and NIS)
alternate source files: 4.2.6. Using alternate map source files (Managing NFS and NIS)
NIS maps, ASCII code: 3.2.3. Installing NIS slave servers (Managing NFS and NIS)
source netgroup: 3.3.2. Netgroups (Managing NFS and NIS)
Source Port: 1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
source port, filtering by: 8.7.4. Risks of Filtering by Source Port (Building Internet Firewalls)
Source Port numbers (UDP): 1.6.1. User Datagram Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Source Quench Message (ICMP): 1.5.2. Internet Control Message Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
source routing: 10.10.3. Turning Off Routing (Building Internet Firewalls)
4.1. Path Discovery with traceroute (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
4.1.2. Complications with traceroute (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
option, IP: 4.2.2. IP Options (Building Internet Firewalls)
sourcegateways parameter (gated): B.8.2. The rip Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sourcenet parameter (gated): B.8.5. The egp Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sources for tools: A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
sources of host information, checking: 6.4.2. Sun's Solaris 2.x (DNS and Bind)
sources of information: B.1. Sources of Information (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
space as resource record name: 4.4.3. Repeat Last Name (DNS and Bind)
spam: 16.1.2.1. Junk mail (Building Internet Firewalls)
preventing (sendmail features): E.3.2. FEATURE (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sendmail macros: E.3.4. DOMAIN (TCP/IP Network Administration)
spanning ports: 5.2. Access to Traffic (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
spanning tree protocols: 5.4.2.3. Controlling what's displayed (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
spcl.DOMAIN file: 7.2.5. Generating Zone Data Files from the Host Table (DNS and Bind)
SPEC SFS tool: 10.1.6. NFS (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
special option: 8.2.1. Primary Master and Slave Servers (DNS and Bind)
Spectrum for Cabletron: 5.3. Element Managers (Vendor-Specific Management) (Essential SNMP)
speed command (dip): 6.3.2. Dial-Up PPP (TCP/IP Network Administration)
A.1.1. The dip Script File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
speed of lines: A. Using Input and Output Octets (Essential SNMP)
speed, processing: 10.3.2. How Fast a Machine? (Building Internet Firewalls)
speeds of interfaces: 8.4.1.1. mrtg configuration file (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
spell command, Unix: 11.6. Running a Security Audit (Building Internet Firewalls)
SPF (Dijkstra Shortest Path First) algorithm: 7.4.3. Open Shortest Path First (TCP/IP Network Administration)
spf-interval parameter (gated): B.8.3. The isis Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
spidermap scanning scripts: 6.4. Scripts (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
spies: 1.2.2.4. Spies (industrial and otherwise) (Building Internet Firewalls)
SPKI (Simple Public Key Infrastructure): C.3.2. Certificates (Building Internet Firewalls)
split namespace: 11.3.5. A Split Namespace (DNS and Bind)
split-screened subnets, architecture of: 6.4.1. Split-Screened Subnet (Building Internet Firewalls)
spoofed addresses: 6.2.2. nmap (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
hping settings: 9.1.1.1. hping (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
9.1.1.1. hping (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
nmap settings: 6.2.2. nmap (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
preventing with ssh: 11.1.3. ssh (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
in Smurf attacks: 3.3.3.2. Smurf Attacks (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
3.3.3.2. Smurf Attacks (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
source routing and: 4.1.2. Complications with traceroute (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
spoofing attacks: 3.10.2. Name Service and IP Spoofing (SSH, The Secure Shell)
spoofing IP addresses: 4.2.1. Obtaining an IP Address (TCP/IP Network Administration)
spoofing syslog messages: 11.2.1.2. Remote logging (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Spooler service: 12.4.4. Which Services Should You Leave Enabled? (Building Internet Firewalls)
spray packet tool: 4.2.4. Traffic Measurements with netstat (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
9.1.2.1. spray (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
12.2.2.2. Bottleneck analysis (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
spray utility: 13.2.5. Gauging Ethernet interface capacity (Managing NFS and NIS)
SQL databases, logging data to: 8.3.1.2. Web mode (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SQL Server: 23.1.6. Microsoft SQL Server (Building Internet Firewalls)
SQL*Net: 23.1.3. Oracle SQL*Net and Net8 (Building Internet Firewalls)
squash entries (exports file): 9.1.2.2. The /etc/exports file (TCP/IP Network Administration)
src/bin/named-bootconf: 4.3. Setting Up a BIND Configuration File (DNS and Bind)
SRI-NIC host: 1.2.1. The History of the Domain Name System (DNS and Bind)
srm.conf (Apache configuration file): 11.2. Configuring the Apache Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SRP (Secure Remote Password): 1.6.5. Secure Remote Password (SRP) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SRV records: 16.6.5. SRV (DNS and Bind)
SRV (Server Selection) records: C.3.1.11. Server Selection record (TCP/IP Network Administration)
srvtab file: 11.4.5. Kerberos-4 in OpenSSH (SSH, The Secure Shell)
11.4.5. Kerberos-4 in OpenSSH (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ssh
broken features, unexpected behaviors: 12.2.5.1. General client problems (SSH, The Secure Shell)
error messages
"Compression level must be from 1 to 9": 12.2.5.3. ssh (SSH, The Secure Shell)
"rsh not available": 12.2.5.3. ssh (SSH, The Secure Shell)
keywords: B.4. ssh and scp Keywords (SSH, The Secure Shell)
options: B.5. ssh Options (SSH, The Secure Shell)
suspending a chosen instance in a chain of connections: 12.2.5.3. ssh (SSH, The Secure Shell)
unexpected suspension, background processes: 12.2.5.3. ssh (SSH, The Secure Shell)
using instead of rsh: 2.5.1. Other Uses For Agents (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH-1
authentication methods: 3.4.2. Client Authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
client authentication: 3.4.2.3. Trusted-host authentication (Rhosts and RhostsRSA) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
protocols: 3.4. Inside SSH-1 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
trusted-host authentication: 3.4.2.3. Trusted-host authentication (Rhosts and RhostsRSA) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH-1 protocol: 1.5. History of SSH (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH-2 protocols: 1.5. History of SSH (SSH, The Secure Shell)
3.5. Inside SSH-2 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
vs. SSH-1: 3.5. Inside SSH-2 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ssh-add: 2.5. The SSH Agent (SSH, The Secure Shell)
6. Key Management and Agents (SSH, The Secure Shell)
6.3. SSH Agents (SSH, The Secure Shell)
6.3.3. Loading Keys with ssh-add (SSH, The Secure Shell)
error message
"Could not open a connection to your authentication agent": 12.2.3.3. ssh-agent and ssh-add (SSH, The Secure Shell)
12.2.3.3. ssh-agent and ssh-add (SSH, The Secure Shell)
listing keys: 2.5. The SSH Agent (SSH, The Secure Shell)
options: B.9. ssh-add Options (SSH, The Secure Shell)
reading input: 2.5. The SSH Agent (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ssh-agent: 2.5. The SSH Agent (SSH, The Secure Shell)
6. Key Management and Agents (SSH, The Secure Shell)
6.3. SSH Agents (SSH, The Secure Shell)
environment variables: 6.3.2.3. Format of environment variable commands (SSH, The Secure Shell)
failure to terminate after logout: 12.2.3.3. ssh-agent and ssh-add (SSH, The Secure Shell)
options: B.8. ssh-agent Options (SSH, The Secure Shell)
precedence of keys: 6.4.2. Switching Identities with an Agent (SSH, The Secure Shell)
proper invocation with eval command: 6.3.2.1. Single-shell method (SSH, The Secure Shell)
terminating: 6.3.2.1. Single-shell method (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH1 and SSH2 (products): 4.1. SSH1 and SSH2 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ftp sources: 4.1.2. Obtaining the Distribution (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH-ARCH: 3.5.1. Protocol Differences (SSH-1 Versus SSH-2) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ssh-askpass: 2.5. The SSH Agent (SSH, The Secure Shell)
6.3.3. Loading Keys with ssh-add (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH-AUTH: 3.5.1. Protocol Differences (SSH-1 Versus SSH-2) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH Communications Security, Ltd.: 1.5. History of SSH (SSH, The Secure Shell)
4.2. F-Secure SSH Server (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH-CONN: 3.5.1. Protocol Differences (SSH-1 Versus SSH-2) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
.ssh directory, permissions: 5.4.2.1. Acceptable permissions for user files (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ssh-keygen2: 2.4.2. Generating Key Pairs with ssh-keygen (SSH, The Secure Shell)
6.2.2. Generating RSA/DSA Keys for SSH2 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ssh-keygen (secure shell): 12.2.6. Secure Shell (TCP/IP Network Administration)
ssh-keyscan: 13.4. Other SSH-Related Products (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ssh-probe2: 5.4.3.9. Discovering other servers (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH1 product: 1.5. History of SSH (SSH, The Secure Shell)
compared to SSH2: 3.5.2. Implementation Differences (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH (product for BeOS): 13.3. Table of Products (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH Protocol Architecture: 3.5.1. Protocol Differences (SSH-1 Versus SSH-2) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH-related files, securing: 10.3.3. /etc/ssh2/sshd2_config (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ssh (secure shell): 12.2.6. Secure Shell (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SSH Secure Shell (product): 13.3. Table of Products (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ssh-signer2: 3.5.2.3. Setuid client (SSH, The Secure Shell)
4.1.5.2. Installation, files, and directories (SSH, The Secure Shell)
7.4.12. Program Locations (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ssh tools: 11.1.3. ssh (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
books and resources: B.2.3. Specific Protocols (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
extensions: A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Microsoft Windows: 11.5. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
monitoring devices with: 7.3. Non-SNMP Approaches (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
remote probing with: 5.2. Access to Traffic (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
source web site: A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
vnc in ssh sessions: 11.1.2. vnc (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SSH-TRANS: 3.5.1. Protocol Differences (SSH-1 Versus SSH-2) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
Ssh1AgentCompatibility (keyword, SSH2): 7.4.14. SSH1/SSH2 Compatibility (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH_ALL_SCP_STATS: 4.1.5.11. scp behavior (SSH, The Secure Shell)
7.5.7.1. scp1 statistics (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH_AUTH_SOCK: 11.1.2.3. Using an agent (SSH, The Secure Shell)
sshCE: 13.3. Table of Products (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH_CLIENT: 7.4.4.2. Forcing a nonprivileged local port (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH2_CLIENT environment variable, simulating SSH1 from feature in SSH2: 8.2.5.1. Simulating "from" with SSH2 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
Ssh1Compatibility: 5.9. Compatibility Between SSH-1 and SSH-2 Servers (SSH, The Secure Shell)
7.4.14. SSH1/SSH2 Compatibility (SSH, The Secure Shell)
recommended setting: 10.3.3. /etc/ssh2/sshd2_config (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ssh2_config file: 7.1.3.2. Global and local files (SSH, The Secure Shell)
sshd2
-b option for setting server key length: 10.3.3. /etc/ssh2/sshd2_config (SSH, The Secure Shell)
known hosts directories: 5.5.1.5. Fetching public keys of known hosts (SSH, The Secure Shell)
setting maximum allowable connections: 4.1.5.3. TCP/IP support (SSH, The Secure Shell)
sshd1 default path: 4.1.5.9. User logins and shells (SSH, The Secure Shell)
sshd (secure shell daemon): 12.2.6. Secure Shell (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sshd2_config: 5.3.1. Server Configuration Files (SSH, The Secure Shell)
5.3.1. Server Configuration Files (SSH, The Secure Shell)
5.7. Subsystems (SSH, The Secure Shell)
recommended settings: 10.3.3. /etc/ssh2/sshd2_config (SSH, The Secure Shell)
sshdfwd: 9.4.1. TCP-wrappers Configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
sshdfwd-x11: 9.4.1. TCP-wrappers Configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSHDOS: 13.3. Table of Products (SSH, The Secure Shell)
Sshd1Path: 5.9. Compatibility Between SSH-1 and SSH-2 Servers (SSH, The Secure Shell)
sshd.pid: 5.3.3. Changing the Configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ssh.el: 13.4. Other SSH-Related Products (SSH, The Secure Shell)
sshexec.com: 13.3. Table of Products (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ssh_known_hosts file: 3.5.2.1. Host keys (SSH, The Secure Shell)
4.1.6. Creating the Serverwide Known-Hosts File (SSH, The Secure Shell)
7.4.3. Host Keys and Known-Hosts Databases (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH_NO_ALL_SCP_STATS: 4.1.5.11. scp behavior (SSH, The Secure Shell)
7.5.7.1. scp1 statistics (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH_NO_SCP_STATS: 4.1.5.11. scp behavior (SSH, The Secure Shell)
7.5.7.1. scp1 statistics (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH_ORIGINAL_COMMAND: 8.2.4.4. Examining the client's original command (SSH, The Secure Shell)
11.5.2.1. Passing along the remote command (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSHOS2: 13.3. Table of Products (SSH, The Secure Shell)
Ssh1Path: 7.4.14. SSH1/SSH2 Compatibility (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ssh.pid file, path specification: 4.3.5. Compilation Flags (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ssh_prng_cmds: 3.7. Randomness (SSH, The Secure Shell)
4.3.4. Randomness (SSH, The Secure Shell)
~/ssh/rc files: 5.6.4. Arbitrary Actions with /etc/sshrc (SSH, The Secure Shell)
sshregex: A. SSH2 Manpage for sshregex (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH_SCP_STATS: 4.1.5.11. scp behavior (SSH, The Secure Shell)
7.5.7.1. scp1 statistics (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SshSignerPath: 7.4.12. Program Locations (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH_SOCKS_SERVER: 4.1.5.8. SOCKS proxy support (SSH, The Secure Shell)
7.4.6.2. SOCKS in SSH2 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH_TTY environment variables: 7.4.5.5. Pseudo-terminal allocation (TTY/PTY/PTTY) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
8.2.9. Disabling TTY Allocation (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSI (Server Side Includes), security considerations: 11.4.1. The CGI and SSI Threat (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SSL: 7.2. Security Concerns (Essential SNMP)
ssl CA certFile parameter (smb.config file): 9.3.1. Configuring a Samba Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SSL (Secure Socket Layer): and Secure Socket Layer (SSL) (Building Internet Firewalls) 14.7. Transport Layer Security (TLS)
email and: 16.2.2. TLS/SSL, SSMTP, and STARTTLS (Building Internet Firewalls)
SSL (Secure Socket Layers): Protocol (SSH, The Secure Shell) 1.6.6. Secure Socket Layer (SSL)
TCP-based applications, enhanced with: 1.6.7. SSL-Enhanced Telnet and FTP (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSL (Secure Sockets Layer)
Apache: 11.4.5. Using Encryption (TCP/IP Network Administration)
certificates, creating: 11.4.5. Using Encryption (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SSLCertificateFile directive (Apache): 11.4.5. Using Encryption (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SSLCertificateKeyFile directive (Apache): 11.4.5. Using Encryption (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SSLEngine directive (Apache): 11.4.5. Using Encryption (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SSLOptions directive (Apache): 11.4.5. Using Encryption (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SSMTP: 16.2.2. TLS/SSL, SSMTP, and STARTTLS (Building Internet Firewalls)
ssyslog log tool: 11.2.1.2. Remote logging (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SSysQ statistic: 7.6.2.1. BIND 4.9 and 8 statistics (DNS and Bind)
stab (sendmail K command value): E.4.5. The sendmail K Command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
stack fingerprinting
nmap tool: 6.2.2. nmap (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
6.3.3. nmap Revisited (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
passive fingerprinting: 6.3.1. Stack Fingerprinting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
queso tool: 6.3.2. queso (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
uses: 6.3.1. Stack Fingerprinting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
stack (protocol): 1.2. A Data Communications Model (TCP/IP Network Administration)
headers: 1.3. TCP/IP Protocol Architecture (TCP/IP Network Administration)
stack size limit, changing: 10.12.2.2. Changing the stack size limit (DNS and Bind)
stacksize option (named): C.2.5. The options Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
staffing
considerations: 1.1.2. Human Considerations (Essential SNMP)
NMS architecture and: 3.2. NMS Architectures (Essential SNMP)
stale filehandler error: 7.2.5. Pathnames and filehandles (Managing NFS and NIS)
stale filehandles, performance and: 18.8. Stale filehandles (Managing NFS and NIS)
standard configuration files: 2.2.1. Basic Configuration Files (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation: 16.2. Measuring performance (Managing NFS and NIS)
standard resource records: C.3.1. Standard Resource Records (TCP/IP Network Administration)
standards
categories of: 1.1.2. Protocol Standards (TCP/IP Network Administration)
protocols: 1.1.1. TCP/IP Features (TCP/IP Network Administration)
1.1.2. Protocol Standards (TCP/IP Network Administration)
standards track RFCs, maturity levels: 1.1.2. Protocol Standards (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLCA): A.2. Generic Sources (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
start argument (sendmail): 10.2. Running sendmail as a Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
start command: 7.1.1. ndc and controls (BIND 8) (DNS and Bind)
Start of Authority (see SOA records)
start of authority records (see SOA records)
Start registry key: 12.4.1.1. Registry keys (Building Internet Firewalls)
starting
primary master name server: 4.7.1. Starting Up the Name Server (DNS and Bind)
automatically: 4.7.4. Editing the Startup Files (DNS and Bind)
slave name servers: 4.8.1. Setup (DNS and Bind)
starting agents: 6.3.2. Starting an Agent (SSH, The Secure Shell)
starting message: 4.7.2. Check for Syslog Errors (DNS and Bind)
7.6.1. Common Syslog Messages (DNS and Bind)
starting ports for traceroute: 4.1.1. Options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
StartServers directive (Apache): 11.3.3. Managing the Swarm (TCP/IP Network Administration)
STARTTLS: 16.2.2. TLS/SSL, SSMTP, and STARTTLS (Building Internet Firewalls)
startup files: 7.3.1.1. Installing static routes at startup (TCP/IP Network Administration)
2.2.4. Startup Files and Scripts (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
gated: 7.7.2.1. Running gated at startup (TCP/IP Network Administration)
ifconfig command: 6.1.6.7. Putting ifconfig in the startup scripts (TCP/IP Network Administration)
inetd: 5.2.1.1. Understanding /etc/inittab (TCP/IP Network Administration)
mountall command: 9.1.3.2. The vfstab and fstab files (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sendmail: 10.2. Running sendmail as a Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
static routing: 7.3.1.1. Installing static routes at startup (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Unix configuration: 5.2. Startup Files (TCP/IP Network Administration)
xinetd: 5.4. The Extended Internet Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
startup files, editing: 4.7.4. Editing the Startup Files (DNS and Bind)
4.8.1. Setup (DNS and Bind)
startup scripts: 11.3.1.1. Services started by /etc/rc files or directories (Building Internet Firewalls)
stat( ), symbolic links and: 6.4.1. Resolving symbolic links in NFS (Managing NFS and NIS)
STAT command (POP): 3.4.2. Post Office Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
statd: 17.3.4. File Locking with NFS (Building Internet Firewalls)
9.1.1. NFS Daemons (TCP/IP Network Administration)
NFS startup: 6.1. Setting up NFS (Managing NFS and NIS)
state (gated): B.4. Trace Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
state information: 1.4.1. TCP and UDP (Managing NFS and NIS)
recreating: 7.5.3. Recreating state information (Managing NFS and NIS)
stateful protocols: 1.4.1. TCP and UDP (Managing NFS and NIS)
states, booting into: 2.2.4. Startup Files and Scripts (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
states, domains named after: 2.2.2. Further Down (DNS and Bind)
3.2.3. Back in the U.S.A. (DNS and Bind)
static address assignment: 4.2.2. Assigning Host Addresses (TCP/IP Network Administration)
static entries
in ARP tables: 2.1.6. arp (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
in routing tables: 2.1.3. netstat (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
static IP addresses: 6.2.1. IP Address Management (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
static ports, monitoring: 12.6. Port Monitor (Essential SNMP)
static routing: A.1. Routers and their routing tables (Managing NFS and NIS)
A.2. Static routing (Managing NFS and NIS)
7.1. Common Routing Configurations (TCP/IP Network Administration)
startup files: 7.3.1.1. Installing static routes at startup (TCP/IP Network Administration)
tables: 4.3. Planning Routing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
adding routes: 7.3.1. Adding Static Routes (TCP/IP Network Administration)
creating: 7.3. Building a Static Routing Table (TCP/IP Network Administration)
static statements (gated): B.9. static Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
station addresses: 1.3.2. IP host addresses (Managing NFS and NIS)
statistics: 7.6.1. Common Syslog Messages (DNS and Bind)
analyzing for overworked name servers: 8.1.2. Capacity Planning (DNS and Bind)
filters: 14.3.1. Useful filters (Managing NFS and NIS)
monitoring: 7.6.2.3. Using the BIND statistics (DNS and Bind)
NFS diagnostics: 14.2. NFS statistics (Managing NFS and NIS)
snoop and: 14.3. snoop (Managing NFS and NIS)
understanding content of: 7.6.2. Understanding the BIND Statistics (DNS and Bind)
viewing: 8.1.2. Capacity Planning (DNS and Bind)
statistics category: 7.5.3.1. BIND 8 categories (DNS and Bind)
statistics-file option (named): C.2.5. The options Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
statistics in OpenView polling: 9.2.2. OpenView Graphing (Essential SNMP)
statistics interval: 10.12.3.3. Statistics interval (DNS and Bind)
statistics-interval option (named): C.2.5. The options Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
stats command: 7.1.1. ndc and controls (BIND 8) (DNS and Bind)
status command: 7.1.1. ndc and controls (BIND 8) (DNS and Bind)
status daemon: 7.5.1. Lock and status daemons (Managing NFS and NIS)
status information (Net-SNMP): C.3.10. snmpstatus (Essential SNMP)
status lights: 3.1.3.1. Link lights (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
status source (OpenView): 6.1.4. A Few Words About NNM Map Colors (Essential SNMP)
10.2.2.3. Forwarding events and event severities (Essential SNMP)
stderr channel: 7.5.2.3. Stderr channel (DNS and Bind)
STDs (standards RFCs): 1.1.2. Protocol Standards (TCP/IP Network Administration)
stealth port scanners: 2.1.7. Scanning Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
6.2.2. nmap (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
stealth scanning: 6.7. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
step size in packets: 4.2.2.2. pathchar (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
stepping-stone mount points: 18.7. Mount point constructions (Managing NFS and NIS)
steps in troubleshooting (see strategies for troubleshooting)
sticky-bit access, swap files: 8.4. Managing client swap space (Managing NFS and NIS)
stop command: 7.1.1. ndc and controls (BIND 8) (DNS and Bind)
stopbits command (dip): A.1.1. The dip Script File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
storage requirements for data: 3.1. Hardware Considerations (Essential SNMP)
store and forward protocols: 3.4.1. Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
store-and-forward switches: 4.2.2.2. pathchar (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
4.2.2.2. pathchar (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
STORE command (IMAP): 3.4.3. Internet Message Access Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
storing log files: 11.2.2. Log File Management (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
strategies for troubleshooting
generic troubleshooting: 12.1. Generic Troubleshooting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
installation practices and: 12.2.1. Installation Testing (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
task-specific strategies: 12.2. Task-Specific Troubleshooting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
stratum 1 and 2 servers: 11.3. NTP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
stream field (inet.conf file): 5.3. The Internet Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
streams: 1.3. TCP/IP Protocol Architecture (TCP/IP Network Administration)
capturing: 5.5.3. tcpflow (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
following: 5.6.1.1. Using ethereal (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
streams in graphs (NNM): B.1. Using External Data (Essential SNMP)
stress-testing networks: 4.2.4. Traffic Measurements with netstat (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
9.1. Packet Injection Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
strict source routing: 4.1.2. Complications with traceroute (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
StrictHostKeyChecking: 7.4.3.1. Strict host key checking (SSH, The Secure Shell)
strictinterfaces (gated): B.6. Interface Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
StrictModes: 5.4.2.1. Acceptable permissions for user files (SSH, The Secure Shell)
recommended setting: 10.3.2. /etc/sshd_config (SSH, The Secure Shell)
String value (dhcpd option statement): D.3.3. DHCP Options (TCP/IP Network Administration)
string values (printcap file): 9.2.1.1. The printcap file (TCP/IP Network Administration)
strings analysis tool: 5.4.2.3. Controlling what's displayed (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
strings, converting integers to: 11.3.1. Tables (Essential SNMP)
strings, data representation and: 1.5.2. External data representation (Managing NFS and NIS)
stripcharts in tkined: 7.2.3.1. ICMP monitoring (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
strobe port tool: 2.1.7. Scanning Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Structure of Management Information (see SMI)
Structure of Management Information (SMI): 7.1. Overview of SNMP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
stub areas (OSPF hierarchy): 7.4.3. Open Shortest Path First (TCP/IP Network Administration)
stub directive: E.2.9. stub (4.9+) (DNS and Bind)
stub resolvers: 2.5. Resolvers (DNS and Bind)
2.5. Resolvers (DNS and Bind)
stub zones: 9.6.2.1. Stubs: another way to manage delegation (DNS and Bind)
stubhosts parameter (gated): B.8.1. The ospf Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
stunnel: 1.6.8. stunnel (SSH, The Secure Shell)
stunnel (public key encryption): 12.6.2.1. stunnel (TCP/IP Network Administration)
subagents: 4.5. A Look Ahead (Essential SNMP)
7.3.5. Concord SystemEDGE Agent for Unix and NT (Essential SNMP)
subdirectories, share command and: 9.1.2.1. The share command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
subdividing Ethernet segments: 13.4.4. Subdividing an Ethernet (TCP/IP Network Administration)
subdomains: 1.3. The Domain Name System in a Nutshell (DNS and Bind)
2.1.2. Domains (DNS and Bind)
2.1.2. Domains (DNS and Bind)
3.3.2. Creating Domains and Subdomains (TCP/IP Network Administration)
choosing: 3.2.2. Where in the World Do I Fit? (DNS and Bind)
contacting administrator of: 3.2.2. Where in the World Do I Fit? (DNS and Bind)
3.2.3.1. The us domain (DNS and Bind)
control statement and: 7.3. Organizing Your Files (DNS and Bind)
creating: 9.4. How to Become a Parent: Creating Subdomains (DNS and Bind)
delegating: 2.4.1. Delegating Subdomains (DNS and Bind)
9.2. How Many Children? (DNS and Bind)
9.4. How to Become a Parent: Creating Subdomains (DNS and Bind)
checking for conformance: 14.3.10. Incorrect Subdomain Delegation (DNS and Bind)
octet boundaries and: 9.5. Subdomains of in-addr.arpa Domains (DNS and Bind)
vs. domains and zones: 2.4. Name Servers and Zones (DNS and Bind)
guidelines for implementing: 9.1. When to Become a Parent (DNS and Bind)
how many to implement: 9.2. How Many Children? (DNS and Bind)
how to read: 2.2.3. Reading Domain Names (DNS and Bind)
in-addr.arpa domain and: 9.5. Subdomains of in-addr.arpa Domains (DNS and Bind)
names for, choosing: 9.3. What to Name Your Children (DNS and Bind)
registering, cost of: 3.2.3. Back in the U.S.A. (DNS and Bind)
searching for with nslookup: 3.2.2. Where in the World Do I Fit? (DNS and Bind)
size of, parenting and: 9.2. How Many Children? (DNS and Bind)
SOA record, finding for: 3.2.3.1. The us domain (DNS and Bind)
subject (DSN error code): 10.6.2. Transforming the Address (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Subkeys registry key: 12.4.1.1. Registry keys (Building Internet Firewalls)
subnet addresses: 2.2.2. Subnets (TCP/IP Network Administration)
subnet architecture, screened: 6.3. Screened Subnet Architectures (Building Internet Firewalls)
24.1. Screened Subnet Architecture (Building Internet Firewalls)
subnet masks
address masks in interfaces: 2.1.5. ifconfig (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
in ARP tables: 2.1.6. arp (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
assigning, ifconfig command: 6.1.4. Assigning a Subnet Mask (TCP/IP Network Administration)
creating: 2.2.2. Subnets (TCP/IP Network Administration)
defining: 4.2.3. Defining the Subnet Mask (TCP/IP Network Administration)
4.2.3. Defining the Subnet Mask (TCP/IP Network Administration)
distributing: 4.2.3. Defining the Subnet Mask (TCP/IP Network Administration)
packet headers: 5.4.2.4.3. Packet characteristics. (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
5.4.2.4.3. Packet characteristics. (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
port scanning and: 6.2.2. nmap (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
RFCs: 2.2.2. Subnets (TCP/IP Network Administration)
in routing tables: 2.1.3. netstat (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
stack fingerprinting: 6.3.2. queso (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
system configuration: 4. Getting Started (TCP/IP Network Administration)
wildcards in (*): 6.2.2. nmap (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
subnet security, distributing responsibility: 12.1.2.1. Use subnets to distribute control (TCP/IP Network Administration)
subnet statement (dhcpd): 9.5.1. dhcpd.conf (TCP/IP Network Administration)
D.3.1. Topology Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
subnets
collapsing in diagrams: 6.5.1.1. Drawing maps with tkined (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
emulators: 9.2. Network Emulators and Simulators (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
ntop results and: 8.3.1.2. Web mode (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
specifying with sortlist directive: 6.1.5. The sortlist Directive (DNS and Bind)
subnetting
need for: 4.2.2. Assigning Host Addresses (TCP/IP Network Administration)
organization purposes for: 4.2.3. Defining the Subnet Mask (TCP/IP Network Administration)
plans, RFCs: 4.2.1.1. Obtaining an official network address (TCP/IP Network Administration)
topological reasons for: 4.2.3. Defining the Subnet Mask (TCP/IP Network Administration)
subnetting/subnetted networks: E.2.6. sortlist (DNS and Bind)
E.5.5. sortlist (4.9+) (DNS and Bind)
address sorting and: 10.8.1.3. Address sorting on subnetted networks (DNS and Bind)
on/off octet boundaries: 9.5.1. Subnetting on an Octet Boundary (DNS and Bind)
subnetwork masks: 13.2.2. Subnetwork masks (Managing NFS and NIS)
substituting subsystems: 1.1. General Approaches to Troubleshooting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
substitutions, automounter maps: 9.4. Key and variable substitutions (Managing NFS and NIS)
subsystems: 5.3.1. Server Configuration Files (SSH, The Secure Shell)
5.7. Subsystems (SSH, The Secure Shell)
identifying in troubleshooting: 12.1. Generic Troubleshooting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
substituting: 1.1. General Approaches to Troubleshooting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
subsystems (SSH2): 7.4.13. Subsystems (SSH, The Secure Shell)
subtrees: 2.3.1. Naming OIDs (Essential SNMP)
branches of iso(1).org(3).dod(6).internet(1): 2.3.1. Naming OIDs (Essential SNMP)
creating: 11.3. OpenView's Extensible Agent (Essential SNMP)
defining objects under: 11.3. OpenView's Extensible Agent (Essential SNMP)
MIB-II: 2.5. A Closer Look at MIB-II (Essential SNMP)
subtrees in MIBs: 7.1. Overview of SNMP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
displaying with getif: 7.4.2. SNMP Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
displaying with snmptranslate: 7.2.1.5. snmptranslate (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
examining with tkined: 7.2.3.3. Examining MIBs (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
retrieving with scotty: 7.2.2. scotty (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
retrieving with SNMP: 7.2.1.3. snmpgetnext, snmpwalk, and snmptable (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SUCCESS condition: 6.4.2. Sun's Solaris 2.x (DNS and Bind)
success statistic: 7.6.2.2. BIND 9 statistics (DNS and Bind)
successful lookups (debugging example): 13.3.3. A Successful Lookup (BIND 8, Debug Level 1) (DNS and Bind)
summarizing
connection-by-connection statistics: 5.5.7. tcptrace (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
data in ethereal: 5.6.1.1. Using ethereal (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
mrtg results: 8.4.1. mrtg (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
packet captures: 5.5.4. tcp-reduce (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
summary-filter parameter (gated): B.8.3. The isis Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
summary-originate parameter (gated): B.8.3. The isis Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
summary web pages of mrtg results: 8.4.1. mrtg (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Sun Management Center: 5.3. Element Managers (Vendor-Specific Management) (Essential SNMP)
Sun Microsystems: 0. Preface (Managing NFS and NIS)
Sun Microsystems agent software: 5.1. SNMP Agents (Essential SNMP)
Sun RPC: 14.1. Remote Procedure Call (RPC) (Building Internet Firewalls)
14.1. Remote Procedure Call (RPC) (Building Internet Firewalls)
authentication: 14.1.1. Sun RPC Authentication (Building Internet Firewalls)
SunOS 4.x: 14.5.6. SunOS Resolver Is Configured, but Host Doesn't Use DNS (DNS and Bind)
configuring resolvers for: 6.4.1. Sun's SunOS 4.x (DNS and Bind)
superusers
domain, default: 3.3.8. NIS domains (Managing NFS and NIS)
keys, adding: 12.5.4.7. Creating keys (Managing NFS and NIS)
mapping, NFS: 12.4.2. Superuser mapping (Managing NFS and NIS)
restrictions: 12.4.2. Superuser mapping (Managing NFS and NIS)
support-ixfr substatement: 10.4.3. BIND 8 IXFR Configuration (DNS and Bind)
supporting software packages for NMSs: 5.5. Supporting Software (Essential SNMP)
suppressing graph display in mrtg: 8.4.1.1. mrtg configuration file (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
suspending jobs in tkined: 7.2.3.1. ICMP monitoring (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
svc.conf file: 6.4.5. Compaq's Tru64 Unix and Digital Unix (DNS and Bind)
svcsetup utility: 6.4.5. Compaq's Tru64 Unix and Digital Unix (DNS and Bind)
swap command (ntop): 8.3.1.1. Interactive mode (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
swap files
sticky-bit access: 8.4. Managing client swap space (Managing NFS and NIS)
temporary: 8.4. Managing client swap space (Managing NFS and NIS)
VM system and: 8.1. NFS support for diskless clients (Managing NFS and NIS)
swap filesystem, AdminSuite: 8.2. Setting up a diskless client (Managing NFS and NIS)
swap process: 11.3.3. Which Services Should You Leave Enabled? (Building Internet Firewalls)
swap space, diskless clients: 8.4. Managing client swap space (Managing NFS and NIS)
swapper in initialization: 2.2.4. Startup Files and Scripts (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
swapping
adapters: 3.2. Testing Adapters (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
cables: 3.1.3.3. Other cable tests (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
components: 1.1. General Approaches to Troubleshooting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
files, ND and: 8.1. NFS support for diskless clients (Managing NFS and NIS)
security risks of: 10.7.1. NFS Security Risks (SSH, The Secure Shell)
swatch log tool: 11.2.2. Log File Management (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
switch (sendmail K command value): E.4.5. The sendmail K Command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
switched Ethernets: 17.3.1. Switched networks (Managing NFS and NIS)
switches
compared to hubs: 5.2. Access to Traffic (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
cut-through: 4.2.2.2. pathchar (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
4.2.2.2. pathchar (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
networks: 17.2. Network partitioning hardware (Managing NFS and NIS)
point-monitoring tools and: 8.3. Point-Monitoring Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
port aliasing: 5.2. Access to Traffic (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
security and: 5.7.1. Switch Security (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
static addresses and: 6.2.1. IP Address Management (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
store-and-forward: 4.2.2.2. pathchar (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
4.2.2.2. pathchar (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
traffic capture and: 5.2. Access to Traffic (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
traffic monitoring and: 8.1. What, When, and Where (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
types of: 4.2.2.2. pathchar (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
unmanaged switches: 6.5. Mapping or Diagramming (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Sybase: 23.1.5. Sybase (Building Internet Firewalls)
symbolic form in SNMP output: 7.2.1.5. snmptranslate (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
symbolic links: 6.4. Symbolic links (Managing NFS and NIS)
absolute pathnames: 6.4.2. Absolute and relative pathnames (Managing NFS and NIS)
automounter and: 9.1.1. Indirect maps (Managing NFS and NIS)
boot blocks: 8.3.2. Getting a boot block (Managing NFS and NIS)
created by SSH installations: 4.1.4.1. SSH1 and SSH2 on the same machine (SSH, The Secure Shell)
/export subdirectories: 8.2. Setting up a diskless client (Managing NFS and NIS)
exporting filesystems and: 6.4.3. Mount points, exports, and links (Managing NFS and NIS)
mount points construction and: 18.7. Mount point constructions (Managing NFS and NIS)
mounting filesystems and: 6.4.3. Mount points, exports, and links (Managing NFS and NIS)
mounts: 6.4. Symbolic links (Managing NFS and NIS)
relative pathnames: 6.4.2. Absolute and relative pathnames (Managing NFS and NIS)
resolving, NFS: 6.4.1. Resolving symbolic links in NFS (Managing NFS and NIS)
symbols
gated trace statements: B.4. Trace Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sendmail pattern matching: 10.6.1. Pattern Matching (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Symetra: 7.3.7. APC Symetra (Essential SNMP)
SymLinksIfOwnerMatch (Options directive setting): 11.4.2. Controlling Server Options (TCP/IP Network Administration)
symmetric ciphers (see cryptography)
symmetric encryption: 12.6. Encryption (TCP/IP Network Administration)
12.5.2.1. Symmetric key encryption (Managing NFS and NIS)
12.6.1. When Is Symmetric Encryption Useful? (TCP/IP Network Administration)
symptoms
identifying: 12.1. Generic Troubleshooting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
system failures: 1.1. General Approaches to Troubleshooting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SYN bit, TCP headers: 1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SYN flood attacks: 3.11.2. IP and TCP Attacks (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SYN packets, blocking: 6.2.2. nmap (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
sync option (pppd): A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
synchronization, TCP byte numbering: 1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
synchronizing clocks: 11.3. NTP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
synchronizing time: 14.7. Time synchronization (Managing NFS and NIS)
synchronous serial line, TCP/IP: 1.1. Networking overview (Managing NFS and NIS)
syntax
for domain directive: 6.1.1. The Local Domain Name (DNS and Bind)
E.5.1. domain (DNS and Bind)
for search directive: 6.1.3. The search Directive (DNS and Bind)
E.5.2. search (DNS and Bind)
syntax errors: 4.7.2. Check for Syslog Errors (DNS and Bind)
14.3.5. Syntax Error in Configuration File or Zone Data File (DNS and Bind)
14.3.5. Syntax Error in Configuration File or Zone Data File (DNS and Bind)
in resolv.conf file: 14.3.11. Syntax Error in resolv.conf (DNS and Bind)
SERVFAIL responses and: 7.6.2.1. BIND 4.9 and 8 statistics (DNS and Bind)
sys value (share command): 9.1.2.1. The share command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sysContact parameter: 7.1. Parameter Settings (Essential SNMP)
retrieving in Perl: 8.1. Retrieving a Single MIB Value (Essential SNMP)
retrieving with OpenView: 8.1.1. Using HP OpenView to Retrieve Values (Essential SNMP)
setting values: 8.3. Setting a MIB Value (Essential SNMP)
sysctl command: 2.2.3. Kernel (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
sysLocation parameter: 7.1. Parameter Settings (Essential SNMP)
7.1. Parameter Settings (Essential SNMP)
configuring in Net-SNMP: 7.3.4. Net-SNMP (Formerly UCD-SNMP) (Essential SNMP)
retrieving: 2.6.1. The get Operation (Essential SNMP)
8.1.2. Using Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
setting values: 2.6.4. The set Operation (Essential SNMP)
syslog (see also syslog tool)
5.8.1. Logging and SSH1 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
5.8.1. Logging and SSH1 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
queries performed with
command for: 7.1.1. ndc and controls (BIND 8) (DNS and Bind)
running before starting name server: 4.7. Running a Primary Master Name Server (DNS and Bind)
syslog channels: 7.5.2.2. Syslog channels (DNS and Bind)
syslog command (scotty): 6.4.1. Tcl/Tk and scotty (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
syslog file
checking for error messages
example of: 9.4.2. Creating and Delegating a Subdomain (DNS and Bind)
primary master name server and: 4.7.2. Check for Syslog Errors (DNS and Bind)
slave name server and: 4.8.1. Setup (DNS and Bind)
statistics written to: 8.1.2. Capacity Planning (DNS and Bind)
syslog (gated): B.5. Options Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
syslog messages: 7.6.1. Common Syslog Messages (DNS and Bind)
checking for
primary master name server and: 4.7.2. Check for Syslog Errors (DNS and Bind)
slave name server and: 4.8.1. Setup (DNS and Bind)
logging (BIND 8/9): 7.5. Logging in BIND 8 and 9 (DNS and Bind)
syslog-ng tool: 11.2.1.2. Remote logging (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
syslog parameter (gated): B.8.1. The ospf Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
syslog protocol: 22.1.1. syslog (Building Internet Firewalls)
daemons: 11.2.1. Setting Up System Logs on Unix (Building Internet Firewalls)
example output from: 26.2.3. What Should You Watch For? (Building Internet Firewalls)
syslog records: 3.1. Hardware Considerations (Essential SNMP)
10.2.9. Receiving Traps Using Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
syslog tool: 11.2.1. syslog (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
arpwatch data logging: 6.2.3. arpwatch (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
configuring: 11.2.1.1. Configuring syslog (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Microsoft Windows: 11.5. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
modular syslog: 11.2.1.2. Remote logging (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
remote logging: 11.2.1.2. Remote logging (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
secure syslog: 11.2.1.2. Remote logging (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
security holes: 11.2.1.1. Configuring syslog (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
syslog-ng tool: 11.2.1.2. Remote logging (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
syslog.conf configuration file: 3.2. The Host Table (TCP/IP Network Administration)
syslog.conf file: 11.2.1.1. Configuring syslog (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
syslogd daemon: 11.2.1. syslog (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
syslogd manual page: 4.7.2. Check for Syslog Errors (DNS and Bind)
syslogd process: 11.3.3. Which Services Should You Leave Enabled? (Building Internet Firewalls)
SyslogFacility: 5.8.3. Logging and OpenSSH (SSH, The Secure Shell)
5.8.3. Logging and OpenSSH (SSH, The Secure Shell)
sysName parameter: 7.1. Parameter Settings (Essential SNMP)
sysObjectID parameter: 9.2.3.1. Designing collections (Essential SNMP)
sysServices parameter: 7.3.2. Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000 Agent (Essential SNMP)
system
crashes, watching carefully: 10.12.1. Watch Reboots Carefully (Building Internet Firewalls)
cryptographic, components of: C.2. Key Components of Cryptographic Systems (Building Internet Firewalls)
customized: 27.1.7. Restore and Recover (Building Internet Firewalls)
defense, diversity of: 3.7. Diversity of Defense (Building Internet Firewalls)
documenting after incident: 27.1.6. Snapshot the System (Building Internet Firewalls)
27.4.5. Planning for Snapshots (Building Internet Firewalls)
failure of: 3.5. Fail-Safe Stance (Building Internet Firewalls)
keeping up-to-date: 26.3.2. Keeping Your Systems up to Date (Building Internet Firewalls)
labeling and diagramming: 27.5.2. Labeling and Diagramming Your System (Building Internet Firewalls)
logs (see logs)
monitoring: 10.11.2. Consider Using Software to Automate Monitoring (Building Internet Firewalls)
26.2. Monitoring Your System (Building Internet Firewalls)
operating, testing reload of: 27.5.6. Testing the Reload of the Operating System (Building Internet Firewalls)
rebuilding: 27.1.7. Restore and Recover (Building Internet Firewalls)
restoring after incident: 27.1.7. Restore and Recover (Building Internet Firewalls)
planning for: 27.4.6. Planning for Restoration and Recovery (Building Internet Firewalls)
shutting down: 27.1.3. Disconnect or Shut Down, as Appropriate (Building Internet Firewalls)
system administration
defined: 1. Overview of TCP/IP (TCP/IP Network Administration)
distributed servers, managing: 9.6. Managing Distributed Servers (TCP/IP Network Administration)
NFS: 6. System Administration Using the Network File System (Managing NFS and NIS)
NIS: 4. System Management Using NIS (Managing NFS and NIS)
system administrators: 0.4. Audience (DNS and Bind)
system calls
getrlimit(): 7.6.1. Common Syslog Messages (DNS and Bind)
sendto(): 7.6.2.1. BIND 4.9 and 8 statistics (DNS and Bind)
setrlimit(): 7.6.1. Common Syslog Messages (DNS and Bind)
system clocks, synchronizing: 11.3. NTP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
system configuration
end users, distributing to: 4.6. Informing the Users (TCP/IP Network Administration)
initialization scripts: 5.2.1.1. Understanding /etc/inittab (TCP/IP Network Administration)
planning: 4. Getting Started (TCP/IP Network Administration)
system configuration files: 2.2. System Configuration Files (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
application files: 2.2.5.1. Application files (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
configuration programs: 2.2.2. Configuration Programs (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
kernel configuration: 2.2.3. Kernel (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
log files: 2.2.5.3. Log files (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
mrtg: 8.4.1.1. mrtg configuration file (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
security files: 2.2.5.2. Security files (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
startup files and scripts: 2.2.4. Startup Files and Scripts (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
testing: 11.2.3.1. tcpwrappers (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
system contacts (see sysContact parameter)
system failures: 1.1. General Approaches to Troubleshooting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
1.1. General Approaches to Troubleshooting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
1.1. General Approaches to Troubleshooting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
system file, Solaris configuration: 5.1.1. Using Dynamically Loadable Modules (TCP/IP Network Administration)
system files, changing location of (BIND 8/9): 7.4. Changing System File Locations in BIND 8 and 9 (DNS and Bind)
system integrity checkers: 11.4. Security Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
system locations (see sysLocation parameter)
system management: B.2.1. System Management (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
(see also network management)
books and resources: B.2.1. System Management (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
System Management Interface Tool (SMIT): 6.4.4.2. AIX 4.2.1 (DNS and Bind)
System Management Server (SMS): 22.1.3. System Management Server (SMS) (Building Internet Firewalls)
System Messaged Blocks (SMB): 6.6. Politics and Security (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
System Monitor tool: 7.4.3. Other Options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
system performance (see performance monitoring)
System Policy Editor tool: 7.4.3. Other Options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
system queries: 7.6.2.1. BIND 4.9 and 8 statistics (DNS and Bind)
system tuning: 10.12. System Tuning (DNS and Bind)
system uptime, polling: 8.1.1. Using HP OpenView to Retrieve Values (Essential SNMP)
13.4. Other Data-Gathering Applications (Essential SNMP)
System V
Line Printer configuration: 9.2.2. Line Printer Service (TCP/IP Network Administration)
vfstab files, options: 9.1.3.2. The vfstab and fstab files (TCP/IP Network Administration)
System V startup model: 5.2. Startup Files (TCP/IP Network Administration)
inittab file: 5.2.1.1. Understanding /etc/inittab (TCP/IP Network Administration)
runlevels: 5.2.1. Startup Runlevels (TCP/IP Network Administration)
System V systems: 2.2.4. Startup Files and Scripts (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SystemEDGE: 5.1. SNMP Agents (Essential SNMP)
configuring: 7.3.5. Concord SystemEDGE Agent for Unix and NT (Essential SNMP)
configuration file: 7.3.5.1. Simple configuration (Essential SNMP)
11.2.1. Extensibility for Unix and Windows NT (Essential SNMP)
11.2.1. Extensibility for Unix and Windows NT (Essential SNMP)
plug-ins: 7.3.5.2. Advanced configuration (Essential SNMP)
extending: 11. Extensible SNMP Agents (Essential SNMP)
11.2. SystemEDGE (Essential SNMP)
parameters: 7.3.5.2. Advanced configuration (Essential SNMP)
11.2.1. Extensibility for Unix and Windows NT (Essential SNMP)
11.2.2. Added Extensibility for Windows NT (Essential SNMP)
self-monitoring capabilities: 7.3.5.2. Advanced configuration (Essential SNMP)
systemid systemid parameter (gated): B.8.3. The isis Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Systems Management Server (SMS): 5.8. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)


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