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Index: P

--prefix: 4.1.5.2. Installation, files, and directories (SSH, The Secure Shell)
7.5.8. Locating the ssh Executable (SSH, The Secure Shell)
recommended setting: 10.2. Compile-Time Configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
P command (sendmail): 10.5.6. Defining Mail Precedence (TCP/IP Network Administration)
packages
Apache, locating names of: 11.1.1. Using the Red Hat Package Manager (TCP/IP Network Administration)
installed package information: A.1.2. Solaris Packages (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
installing in Solaris: A.1.2. Solaris Packages (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
integrity: A.1.2. Solaris Packages (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Red Hat Package Manager: A.1.3. Red Hat Package Manager (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
removing: A.1.2. Solaris Packages (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
wrapper, security: 12.5.1. wrapper (TCP/IP Network Administration)
12.5.1.1. tcpd access control files (TCP/IP Network Administration)
packages, auditing: 10.10.7.1. Auditing packages (Building Internet Firewalls)
Unix: 11.6. Running a Security Audit (Building Internet Firewalls)
packet altering: 4.1. What Does a Packet Look Like? (Building Internet Firewalls)
IP (see IP)
packet analyzers: 5.1. Traffic Capture Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
5.6. Packet Analyzers (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
packet capture
access to traffic: 5.2. Access to Traffic (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
analysis tools: 5.5. Analysis Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
5.6. Packet Analyzers (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
checking email clients: 10.1.1. Email (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
ethereal tool: 5.6.1.1. Using ethereal (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
host-monitoring tools: 8.1. What, When, and Where (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
8.2. Host-Monitoring Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Microsoft Windows tools: 5.8. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
network-monitoring tools: 8.1. What, When, and Where (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
8.4. Network-Monitoring Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
point-monitoring tools: 8.1. What, When, and Where (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
8.3. Point-Monitoring Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
promiscuous mode and: 5.3. Capturing Data (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
remote packet capture: 8.5. RMON (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
restricting tools and privileges: 5.7.2. Protecting Yourself (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
retransmitting captured packets: 9.1.1.3. Other tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
security and privacy issues: 5. Packet Capture (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
5.7. Dark Side of Packet Capture (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SNMP agents: 7.2.1.7. snmpstatus (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
7.2.1.8. Agents and traps (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
snmpnetstat tool: 7.2.1.6. snmpnetstat (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
snoop tool: 5.5.10. Other Packet Capture Programs (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
tcpdump tool: 5.4. tcpdump (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
techniques: 5.3. Capturing Data (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
traffic capture tools: 5.1. Traffic Capture Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Packet Capture Library (libpcap): 13.5.3. Capture filters (Managing NFS and NIS)
packet category: 7.5.3.1. BIND 8 categories (DNS and Bind)
packet filtering: 5.1. Some Firewall Definitions (Building Internet Firewalls)
5.2. Packet Filtering (Building Internet Firewalls)
8. Packet Filtering (Building Internet Firewalls)
12.7. Firewalls (TCP/IP Network Administration)
implementations, on general-purpose computers: 8.9. Packet Filtering Implementations for General-Purpose Computers (Building Internet Firewalls)
on Windows NT: 8.9.5. Windows NT Packet Filtering (Building Internet Firewalls)
by address: 8.6. Filtering by Address (Building Internet Firewalls)
administering systems: 8.4. Packet Filtering Tips and Tricks (Building Internet Firewalls)
bastion hosts, protection for: 10.10.4. Controlling Inbound Traffic (Building Internet Firewalls)
bugs in packages: 5.2.2.1. Current filtering tools are not perfect (Building Internet Firewalls)
conventions for: 8.8.3. It Should Allow Simple Specification of Rules (Building Internet Firewalls)
dynamic: 8.1.2. Stateful or Dynamic Packet Filtering (Building Internet Firewalls)
examples of: 8.12. Putting It All Together (Building Internet Firewalls)
with exterior router: 6.3.4. Exterior Router (Building Internet Firewalls)
inbound vs. outbound: 8.8.6. It Should Apply Rules Separately to Incoming and Outgoing Packets, on a Per-Interface Basis (Building Internet Firewalls)
with interior router: 6.3.3. Interior Router (Building Internet Firewalls)
perimeter, encryption and: 5.5.1. Where Do You Encrypt? (Building Internet Firewalls)
routers
configuring: 8.2. Configuring a Packet Filtering Router (Building Internet Firewalls)
choosing: 8.8. Choosing a Packet Filtering Router (Building Internet Firewalls)
rules for: 8.5. Conventions for Packet Filtering Rules (Building Internet Firewalls)
8.11. What Rules Should You Use? (Building Internet Firewalls)
8.12. Putting It All Together (Building Internet Firewalls)
24.2.2. Packet Filtering Rules (Building Internet Firewalls)
in screened subnet architecture: 24.1.2. Packet Filtering Rules (Building Internet Firewalls)
editing offline: 8.4.1. Edit Your Filtering Rules Offline (Building Internet Firewalls)
IP addresses in: 8.4.4. Always Use IP Addresses, Never Hostnames (Building Internet Firewalls)
reloading: 8.4.2. Reload Rule Sets from Scratch Each Time (Building Internet Firewalls)
sequence of: 8.8.5. It Should Apply Rules in the Order Specified (Building Internet Firewalls)
updating: 8.4.3. Replace Packet Filters Atomically (Building Internet Firewalls)
with screened host architecture: 6.2. Screened Host Architectures (Building Internet Firewalls)
by service: 8.7. Filtering by Service (Building Internet Firewalls)
snoop and: 13.7.1. Packet Filters (TCP/IP Network Administration)
by source port: 8.7.4. Risks of Filtering by Source Port (Building Internet Firewalls)
stateful: 8.1.2. Stateful or Dynamic Packet Filtering (Building Internet Firewalls)
testing: 8.8.8. It Should Have Good Testing and Validation Capabilities (Building Internet Firewalls)
tools for: B.3. Packet Filtering Tools (Building Internet Firewalls)
where to do: 8.10. Where to Do Packet Filtering (Building Internet Firewalls)
packet filters: 11.3.1.1. Packet filters (DNS and Bind)
packet injection tools: 9.1. Packet Injection Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
custom packets generators: 9.1.1. Custom Packets Generators (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
emulators: 9.2.1. NISTNet (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
load generators: 9.1.2. Load Generators (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
using packet sniffers with: 9.1.1.2. nemesis (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Packet InterNet Groper (see ping tools)
packet pair software: 4.2.2.4. Packet pair software (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
packet sniffers: 7.2. Security Concerns (Essential SNMP)
7.2. Security Concerns (Essential SNMP)
5.1. Traffic Capture Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
5.1. Traffic Capture Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
capture and retransmission: 9.1.1.3. Other tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
detecting: 5.7.2. Protecting Yourself (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SNMP messages and: 7.1. Overview of SNMP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
switches and: 5.7.1. Switch Security (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
using with packet generators: 9.1.1.2. nemesis (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
packet sniffing attacks: 13.1.6. Packet Sniffing (Building Internet Firewalls)
protecting against: 13.1.10. Protecting Services (Building Internet Firewalls)
Packet socket option (Linux kernel configuration): 5.1.3. Linux Kernel Configuration (TCP/IP Network Administration)
packet stretch measurements: 4.2.2.4. Packet pair software (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
packet switching networks: 1.5.1.1. The datagram (TCP/IP Network Administration)
packets: 4. Packets and Protocols (Building Internet Firewalls)
5.1. Some Firewall Definitions (Building Internet Firewalls)
22.4.2. traceroute (Building Internet Firewalls)
1.3.1. Datagrams and packets (Managing NFS and NIS)
1.3.1. Datagrams and packets (Managing NFS and NIS)
1.3. TCP/IP Protocol Architecture (TCP/IP Network Administration)
1.5.1.1. The datagram (TCP/IP Network Administration)
(see also datagrams)
accepted/dropped, logging: 8.8.7. It Should Be Able to Log Accepted and Dropped Packets (Building Internet Firewalls)
analysis summary: 5.4.2.3. Controlling what's displayed (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
blocking: 7.2. Security Concerns (Essential SNMP)
3.3.2.2. Interpreting results (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
capturing (see packet capture)
capturing, BSD Unix support: 5.1.5.2. The pseudo-device statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
characteristics: 5.4.2.4.3. Packet characteristics. (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
customized packets: 9.1. Packet Injection Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
9.1.1. Custom Packets Generators (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
damaged: 3.3.2.2. Interpreting results (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
data link layer (7-layer model): 1.2.1. Frames and network interfaces (Managing NFS and NIS)
datagrams in UDP: 2.1. SNMP and UDP (Essential SNMP)
DHCPDISCOVER: 3.6.2.1. How DHCP works (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DHCPOFFER: 3.6.2.1. How DHCP works (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dropped: 9.1.2.1. spray (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
duplicate: 3.3.2.2. Interpreting results (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
encrypting: F.2.1. Configuring SNMPv3 for a Cisco Router (Essential SNMP)
envelopes: 1.2.1. Frames and network interfaces (Managing NFS and NIS)
fields in: 9.1. Packet Injection Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
filtering: 12.7. Firewalls (TCP/IP Network Administration)
filters: 3.3.2.2. Interpreting results (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
5.4.2.4.3. Packet characteristics. (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
flooding networks with: 3.3.2.3. Options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
forged: 8.2.3. Default Permit Versus Default Deny (Building Internet Firewalls)
forged ARP packets: 5.7.1. Switch Security (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
fragmentation: 3.3.2.3. Options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
fragmentation, avoiding: 6.1.6.5. Maximum transmission unit (TCP/IP Network Administration)
fragmenting: 4.1.1.2. IP layer (Building Internet Firewalls)
4.2.3. IP Fragmentation (Building Internet Firewalls)
gateways: 1.5.1.1. The datagram (TCP/IP Network Administration)
handling (by router): 8.3. What Does the Router Do with Packets? (Building Internet Firewalls)
headers in: 5.4.2.4.3. Packet characteristics. (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
5.4.2.4.3. Packet characteristics. (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
9.1.1.1. hping (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
headers of: 4.1. What Does a Packet Look Like? (Building Internet Firewalls)
Hello (OSPF): 7.4.3. Open Shortest Path First (TCP/IP Network Administration)
hexadecimal: 5.4.2.3. Controlling what's displayed (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
5.6.1.1. Using ethereal (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
9.1.1.1. hping (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
host status information: C.3.10. snmpstatus (Essential SNMP)
ICMP: 22.4.3. Other ICMP Packets (Building Internet Firewalls)
inbound vs. outbound: 8.2.2. Be Careful of "Inbound" Versus "Outbound" Semantics (Building Internet Firewalls)
intervals between: 3.3.2.3. Options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
length: 3.3.3.3. Ping of Death (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
5.4.2.4.3. Packet characteristics. (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
limiting capture: 5.4.2.1. Controlling program behavior (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
listing number sent: 2.1.3. netstat (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
load generators: 9.1. Packet Injection Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
lost packets: 3.3.2.2. Interpreting results (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
4.1. Path Discovery with traceroute (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
4.2.2.3. bing (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
5.3. Capturing Data (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
9.1.2.1. spray (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
MTU (maximum transmission unit): 1.5.1.3. Fragmenting datagrams (TCP/IP Network Administration)
number captured: 5.4.2.1. Controlling program behavior (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
5.6.1.1. Using ethereal (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
5.6.1.1. Using ethereal (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
8.3.1.1. Interactive mode (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
number sent: 3.3.2.3. Options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
4.1.1. Options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
4.2.2.2. pathchar (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
9.1.1.1. hping (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
9.1.2.1. spray (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
offsets in headers: 5.4.2.4.3. Packet characteristics. (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
out-of-order: 5.5.3. tcpflow (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
oversized packets: 3.3.3.3. Ping of Death (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
path discovery: 4.1. Path Discovery with traceroute (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
patterns for data: 3.3.2.3. Options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
performance measurements: 4.2.1. Performance Measurements (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
ping and: 3.3.2. How ping Works (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
3.3.2.2. Interpreting results (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
protocol trees for: 5.6.1.1. Using ethereal (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
rate of sending: 3.3.2.3. Options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
retransmitting after capture: 9.1.1.3. Other tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
round-trip times: 3.3.2. How ping Works (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
routing: 1.5.1.1. The datagram (TCP/IP Network Administration)
routing tables: 2.4. The Routing Table (TCP/IP Network Administration)
setup or teardown: 5.4.2.4.3. Packet characteristics. (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
size: 3.3.2.3. Options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
3.3.3.3. Ping of Death (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
4.2.2.2. pathchar (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
4.2.2.3. bing (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
8.3.1.2. Web mode (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
9.1.1.1. hping (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
9.1.2.1. spray (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
9.1.2.2. MGEN (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
sniffing (see packet sniffers)
13.1.10. Protecting Services (Building Internet Firewalls)
5. Packet Capture (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
programs: 13.1.6. Packet Sniffing (Building Internet Firewalls)
SNMP packets: 7.2.1.2. Configuration and options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
snoop and: 13.5.1. snoop (Managing NFS and NIS)
source-routed: 10.10.3. Turning Off Routing (Building Internet Firewalls)
spray tool: 9.1.2.1. spray (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
structure: 4.1. What Does a Packet Look Like? (Building Internet Firewalls)
TCP: 4.3.1. TCP (Building Internet Firewalls)
timeouts for: 4.1.1. Options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
timestamps in: 3.3.2.3. Options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
truncating: 5.4.2.1. Controlling program behavior (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
TTL field: 4.1. Path Discovery with traceroute (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
UDP: 4.3.2. UDP (Building Internet Firewalls)
see also datagrams: 1.3.1. Datagrams and packets (Managing NFS and NIS)
packets option
BGP: B.8.4. The bgp Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
EGP tracing: B.8.5. The egp Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
packets parameter (gated): B.8.8. The icmp Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
packets, TCP format: 3.4.1. Establishing the Secure Connection (SSH, The Secure Shell)
.pag files: 3.3.5. Map files (Managing NFS and NIS)
makedbm utility: 3.3.6. Map naming (Managing NFS and NIS)
page cache: 16.5.3. Memory usage (Managing NFS and NIS)
page mapping system, buffer cache: 7.3.2. Client I/O system (Managing NFS and NIS)
page process: 11.3.3. Which Services Should You Leave Enabled? (Building Internet Firewalls)
PAM (Pluggable Authentication Modules): 21.4.2. Pluggable Authentication Modules (PAM) (Building Internet Firewalls)
4.3.3. PAM (SSH, The Secure Shell)
5.5.1.11. PAM authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
authentication using: 5.5.1.11. PAM authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
configuration: 12.2.2.2. Password authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
panic category: 7.5.3.1. BIND 8 categories (DNS and Bind)
pap-max-authreq option (pppd): A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
PAP (Password Authentication Protocol): 6.3.4. PPP Daemon Security (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pap-restart option (pppd): A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pap-secrets file: 6.3.4. PPP Daemon Security (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pap-timeout option (pppd): A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
papcrypt option (pppd): A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
papers, security-related: A.8. Papers (Building Internet Firewalls)
PAR (Positive Acknowledgment with Re-transmission): 1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
parallel (MIME data subtype): 3.4.4. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (TCP/IP Network Administration)
parameter statements (dhcpd): D.3.2. Configuration Parameters (TCP/IP Network Administration)
parameters
boot parameters
confusion, case study: 15.3. Boot parameter confusion (Managing NFS and NIS)
diskless clients: 8.3.4. Managing boot parameters (Managing NFS and NIS)
clnt_idle_timeout: C. Tunable Parameters (Managing NFS and NIS)
clnt_max_conns: C. Tunable Parameters (Managing NFS and NIS)
define m4 macro: E.3.1. define (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dhcpd.conf file: 9.5.1. dhcpd.conf (TCP/IP Network Administration)
gated
aggregate statement: B.11. Aggregate Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
bgp statement: B.8.4. The bgp Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
egp statement: B.8.5. The egp Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
icmp statement: B.8.8. The icmp Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
isis statement: B.8.3. The isis Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
kernel statement: B.8.10. The kernel Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
ospf statement: B.8.1. The ospf Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
rip statement: B.8.2. The rip Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
routerdiscovery statement: B.8.9. The routerdiscovery Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
smux statement: B.8.6. The smux Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
static statements: B.9. static Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
in performance measurement: 12.2.2.1. General steps (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
iptables command: 12.7.2.1. Defining iptables filter rules (TCP/IP Network Administration)
mount
retrans: 18.1.2. Timeout period calculation (Managing NFS and NIS)
timeo mount: 18.1.2. Timeout period calculation (Managing NFS and NIS)
MRTG: 13.1. Using MRTG (Essential SNMP)
13.3. Graphing Other Objects (Essential SNMP)
13.3. Graphing Other Objects (Essential SNMP)
nfs_max_threads: C. Tunable Parameters (Managing NFS and NIS)
nfs3_max_transfer_size: C. Tunable Parameters (Managing NFS and NIS)
nfs_nra: C. Tunable Parameters (Managing NFS and NIS)
nfs_shrinkreaddir: C. Tunable Parameters (Managing NFS and NIS)
nfs_write_error_to_cons_only: C. Tunable Parameters (Managing NFS and NIS)
OpenView xnmgraph: 9.2.2. OpenView Graphing (Essential SNMP)
Perl: E.2. SNMP Operations (Essential SNMP)
printcap file: 9.2.1.1. The printcap file (TCP/IP Network Administration)
RMON: 9.1.1.1. RMON configuration (Essential SNMP)
9.1.1.1. RMON configuration (Essential SNMP)
rsize: C. Tunable Parameters (Managing NFS and NIS)
SNMP objects as: 7.1. Overview of SNMP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SNMP settings: 7.1. Parameter Settings (Essential SNMP)
SystemEDGE: 7.3.5.2. Advanced configuration (Essential SNMP)
11.2.1. Extensibility for Unix and Windows NT (Essential SNMP)
11.2.2. Added Extensibility for Windows NT (Essential SNMP)
-t timeout: C. Tunable Parameters (Managing NFS and NIS)
tunable: C. Tunable Parameters (Managing NFS and NIS)
wsize: C. Tunable Parameters (Managing NFS and NIS)
parent domains: 2.3. Delegation (DNS and Bind)
3.2.5. Registering Your Zones (DNS and Bind)
(see also domains)
contacting administrator of: 3.2.3.1. The us domain (DNS and Bind)
registering: 3.2.5. Registering Your Zones (DNS and Bind)
parent-level aliases: 9.7.1. Removing Parent Aliases (DNS and Bind)
parent zones, contacting administrators of: 8.3. Registering Name Servers (DNS and Bind)
parentheses ()
grouping data: A.1. Master File Format (DNS and Bind)
in SOA records: 4.2.4. SOA Records (DNS and Bind)
parenting: 9. Parenting (DNS and Bind)
guidelines for: 9.1. When to Become a Parent (DNS and Bind)
highlights of: 9.8. The Life of a Parent (DNS and Bind)
subdomains and
creating: 9.4. How to Become a Parent: Creating Subdomains (DNS and Bind)
in-addr.arpa domain: 9.5. Subdomains of in-addr.arpa Domains (DNS and Bind)
transitioning to: 9.7. Managing the Transition to Subdomains (DNS and Bind)
parity command (dip): A.1.1. The dip Script File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
parse (gated): B.4. Trace Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
parser category: 7.5.3.1. BIND 8 categories (DNS and Bind)
parsing DNS responses: 15.2.7. Parsing DNS Responses (DNS and Bind)
partial (MIME data subtype): 3.4.4. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (TCP/IP Network Administration)
partial-slave name servers: 8.2.3. Partial-Slave Servers (DNS and Bind)
benefits of: 8.2.3. Partial-Slave Servers (DNS and Bind)
registering name servers and: 8.3. Registering Name Servers (DNS and Bind)
partitioned networks
hardware: 17.2. Network partitioning hardware (Managing NFS and NIS)
and NIS: 17.4.1. NIS in a partitioned network (Managing NFS and NIS)
partitioning
diskless clients and: 8.1. NFS support for diskless clients (Managing NFS and NIS)
diskless nodes and: 17.4.2. Effects on diskless nodes (Managing NFS and NIS)
low-bandwidth networks: 17.3. Network infrastructure (Managing NFS and NIS)
NIS and: 17.4.1. NIS in a partitioned network (Managing NFS and NIS)
NLM and: 11.2.2.3. Network partition (Managing NFS and NIS)
partitions, manipulating: 12.4. Veritas Disk Check (Essential SNMP)
PASS command (POP): 3.4.2. Post Office Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pass-filter option (pppd): A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
passive fingerprinting: 6.3.1. Stack Fingerprinting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
passive (gated): B.6. Interface Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
passive keyword (routed command): 7.4.1.1. Running RIP with routed (TCP/IP Network Administration)
passive option (pppd command): A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
configuring PPP servers: 6.3.5. PPP Server Configuration (TCP/IP Network Administration)
passive (or PASV) mode, FTP: 17.1.1. Packet Filtering Characteristics of FTP (Building Internet Firewalls)
passive parameter (gated): B.8.4. The bgp Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
PASSLENGTH (passwd file value): 12.2.1. The Shadow Password File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
passphrases: F.2.1. Configuring SNMPv3 for a Cisco Router (Essential SNMP)
F.2.2. Configuring SNMPv3 for Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
F.2.2.1. Using snmpusm to manage users (Essential SNMP)
F.2.2.2. Simplifying commands by setting defaults (Essential SNMP)
2.4.2. Generating Key Pairs with ssh-keygen (SSH, The Secure Shell)
batch or cron jobs: 11.1.2.1. Storing the passphrase in the filesystem (SSH, The Secure Shell)
changing: 2.4.4. If You Change Your Key (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH1: 6.2.1. Generating RSA Keys for SSH1 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
choosing a secure passphrase: 10.5. Key Management (SSH, The Secure Shell)
limitations: 2.5. The SSH Agent (SSH, The Secure Shell)
protecting: 7.4.5.7. Backgrounding a remote command, take two (SSH, The Secure Shell)
selection: 6.2.4. Selecting a Passphrase (SSH, The Secure Shell)
specifying
SSH1: 6.2.1. Generating RSA Keys for SSH1 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
troubleshooting, prompting for passphrase of wrong key: 12.2.2.4. Public-key authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
passwd command (Solaris): 12.2.1. The Shadow Password File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
passwd file: 9.3.1. Configuring a Samba Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
default values: 12.2.1. The Shadow Password File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
domains and: 4.4. Managing multiple domains (Managing NFS and NIS)
PPP servers, configuring: 6.3.5. PPP Server Configuration (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sample script: E.4.5.1. Sample script (TCP/IP Network Administration)
security considerations: 12.4.2. Looking for Trouble (TCP/IP Network Administration)
passwd map, root entry: 3.2.2. Installing the NIS master server (Managing NFS and NIS)
passwd.byname map: 3.3. Files managed under NIS (Managing NFS and NIS)
3.3.6. Map naming (Managing NFS and NIS)
passwd.byuid map: 3.3.6. Map naming (Managing NFS and NIS)
password aging: 26.1.2. Managing Your Accounts (Building Internet Firewalls)
password authentication
SSH1: 3.4.2.1. Password authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
troubleshooting: 12.1.2. Server Debugging (SSH, The Secure Shell)
Password Authentication Protocol (PAP): 6.3.4. PPP Daemon Security (TCP/IP Network Administration)
password command (dip): 6.3.2. Dial-Up PPP (TCP/IP Network Administration)
A.1.1. The dip Script File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
password expiration warnings: 5.6.2. Expired Account or Password (SSH, The Secure Shell)
password files
maps, generating: 3.3.6. Map naming (Managing NFS and NIS)
netgroups map and: 3.3.2. Netgroups (Managing NFS and NIS)
nicknames: 3.3.7. Map structure (Managing NFS and NIS)
updates: 4.2.4. Password file updates (Managing NFS and NIS)
password hashes, system accounts: 3.2.2. Installing the NIS master server (Managing NFS and NIS)
password parameter (gated): B.8.6. The smux Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
password prompting
SSH1: 7.4.5.2. Password prompting in SSH1 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
password prompts, suppression with batch mode: 7.4.5.4. Batch mode: suppressing prompts (SSH, The Secure Shell)
PasswordAuthentication: 5.5.1.1. Password authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
PasswordExpireWarningDays: 5.6.2. Expired Account or Password (SSH, The Secure Shell)
PasswordGuesses: 5.4.3.5. Failed logins (SSH, The Secure Shell)
5.4.3.5. Failed logins (SSH, The Secure Shell)
PasswordPrompt: 7.4.5.3. Password prompting in SSH2 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
PasswordPromptHost: 7.4.5.2. Password prompting in SSH1 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
PasswordPromptLogin: 7.4.5.2. Password prompting in SSH1 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
passwords: 21.1. What Is Authentication? (Building Internet Firewalls)
21.1.2. Something You Know (Building Internet Firewalls)
2.2. SNMP Communities (Essential SNMP)
(see also community strings)
for packet filters: 8.4.5. Password Protect Your Packet Filters (Building Internet Firewalls)
on PostScript printers: 17.6. Printing Protocols (Building Internet Firewalls)
in SSH: 18.2.5.3. SSH client authentication (Building Internet Firewalls)
on web pages: 15.2.1. Inadvertent Release of Information (Building Internet Firewalls)
aging: 12.2.1. The Shadow Password File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
authentication: 5.5.1.1. Password authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
authentication, OSPF: 7.4.3. Open Shortest Path First (TCP/IP Network Administration)
automatically generated: 21.2. Passwords (Building Internet Firewalls)
cracking: 21.2. Passwords (Building Internet Firewalls)
3.11.1. Password Cracking (SSH, The Secure Shell)
creating in SNMPv3: F.2.1. Configuring SNMPv3 for a Cisco Router (Essential SNMP)
F.2.2. Configuring SNMPv3 for Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
databases, user authentication (Apache): 11.4.4.2. Improved user authentication (TCP/IP Network Administration)
default SNMPv3 configurations: F.2.2.2. Simplifying commands by setting defaults (Essential SNMP)
encrypting: F.2.1. Configuring SNMPv3 for a Cisco Router (Essential SNMP)
engine IDs and: F.2.2.1. Using snmpusm to manage users (Essential SNMP)
false authentication and: 13.1.4. False Authentication of Clients (Building Internet Firewalls)
local files: 3.3.1. Working with the maps (Managing NFS and NIS)
NIS security and: 12.3. Password and NIS security (Managing NFS and NIS)
root password: 12.3.1. Managing the root password with NIS (Managing NFS and NIS)
one-time: 21.1.3. Something You Have (Building Internet Firewalls)
21.3.1. One-Time Password Software (Building Internet Firewalls)
12.2.3. One-Time Passwords (TCP/IP Network Administration)
OPIE: 12.2.4. OPIE (TCP/IP Network Administration)
one-time passwords: 4.3.5. Compilation Flags (SSH, The Secure Shell)
PROM: 12.3.2. Making NIS more secure (Managing NFS and NIS)
protecting: 12.3. Password and NIS security (Managing NFS and NIS)
"one-time" use for authentication, SSH1: 3.4.2.5. One-time passwords (SSH, The Secure Shell)
Samba: 9.3.1. Configuring a Samba Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
security risks: 2.4. Authentication by Cryptographic Key (SSH, The Secure Shell)
3.1.3. Authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
selecting: 12.2.2. Choosing a Password (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SNMP community strings: 6.6. Politics and Security (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
7.1. Overview of SNMP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
stealing with network taps: 1.2.1.3. Information theft (Building Internet Firewalls)
tables in SNMPv3: F.2. Configuring SNMPv3 (Essential SNMP)
time-based: 21.5. Kerberos (Building Internet Firewalls)
Unix: 21.2. Passwords (Building Internet Firewalls)
unknown entries: 12.3.3. Unknown password entries (Managing NFS and NIS)
user authentication: 12.2. User Authentication (TCP/IP Network Administration)
shadow password files: 12.2.1. The Shadow Password File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
user updates: 4.2.4. Password file updates (Managing NFS and NIS)
verifying for email accounts: 10.1.1. Email (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Windows NT: 21.2. Passwords (Building Internet Firewalls)
PASV command: 11.2.1. The FTP Protocol (SSH, The Secure Shell)
patch cabling: 3.2. Testing Adapters (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
5.2. Access to Traffic (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
patch devices: 5.2. Access to Traffic (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
patchadd utility: 8.7.1. Dataless clients (Managing NFS and NIS)
patches: 26.3.2. Keeping Your Systems up to Date (Building Internet Firewalls)
for HP-UX: 6.4.3. HP's HP-UX (DNS and Bind)
for IRIX: 6.4.6. Silicon Graphics' IRIX (DNS and Bind)
Path fields (sendmail): 10.5.8. Defining Mailers (TCP/IP Network Administration)
path section (Solaris PPP configuration): 6.3.6. Solaris PPP (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pathchar bandwidth tools: 4.2.2.2. pathchar (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
PathName field, NFS log record: 14.6. NFS server logging (Managing NFS and NIS)
pathnames, NFS: 7.2.5. Pathnames and filehandles (Managing NFS and NIS)
paths
available paths in routing tables: 2.1.3. netstat (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
characteristics
listing all devices on paths: 4.1.2. Complications with traceroute (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
performance: 4.2. Path Performance (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
traceroute discovery: 4.1. Path Discovery with traceroute (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
counting hops on: 3.3.2.2. Interpreting results (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
discovery: 4.1.1. Options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
4.1.2. Complications with traceroute (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
ISP network access: 4.2.3.4. Other related tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
performance
bandwidth measurements: 4.2.2. Bandwidth Measurements (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
measurements: 4.2.1. Performance Measurements (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Microsoft Windows: 4.3. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
throughput measurement: 4.2.3. Throughput Measurements (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
traffic measurements: 4.2.4. Traffic Measurements with netstat (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
unreachable networks: 3.3.2.2. Interpreting results (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
pattern expression in log files: 11.2.2. Log File Management (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
pattern matching, sendmail rewrite rules: 10.6.1. Pattern Matching (TCP/IP Network Administration)
patterns
for packet data: 3.3.2.3. Options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
of usage: 8.1. What, When, and Where (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
pcbind service: 11.3.4.2. Other RPC services (Building Internet Firewalls)
pchar bandwidth tool: 4.2.2.2. pathchar (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
PCM (pulse code modulation): 3.4.4. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (TCP/IP Network Administration)
PC/NFS
configuration: 10.3. Configuring PC/NFS (Managing NFS and NIS)
current use: 10.1. PC/NFS today (Managing NFS and NIS)
file permissions: 10.4.2. Checking file permissions (Managing NFS and NIS)
implementation features: 10.1. PC/NFS today (Managing NFS and NIS)
limitations of: 10.2. Limitations of PC/NFS (Managing NFS and NIS)
mounting filesystems: 10.4.1. Mounting filesystems (Managing NFS and NIS)
overview: 10. PC/NFS Clients (Managing NFS and NIS)
printing: 10.5. Printer services (Managing NFS and NIS)
reasons to use: 10.2.2. Why PC/NFS? (Managing NFS and NIS)
Samba and: 10.2.1. NFS versus SMB (CIFS) (Managing NFS and NIS)
usage issues: 10.4. Common PC/NFS usage issues (Managing NFS and NIS)
Windows Network Neighborhood integration: 10.4.1. Mounting filesystems (Managing NFS and NIS)
pcnfsd: 10.5. Printer services (Managing NFS and NIS)
PDUs (Protocol Data Units)
differences in trap formats: 2.6.7. SNMP Notification (Essential SNMP)
formats for SNMP operations: 2.6. SNMP Operations (Essential SNMP)
peak periods of activity, monitoring: 8.1.2. Capacity Planning (DNS and Bind)
peer subclause (gated): B.8.4. The bgp Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
peeras parameter (gated): B.8.5. The egp Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
peering arrangements: 4.1. Path Discovery with traceroute (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
4.2.3.4. Other related tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
peers: 1.2. A Data Communications Model (TCP/IP Network Administration)
BGP: 7.5.2. Border Gateway Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
B.8.4. The bgp Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
network servers: 3. Network Services (TCP/IP Network Administration)
PenguiNet: 13.3. Table of Products (SSH, The Secure Shell)
per-account authorization files: 5.4.1.6. Per-account authorization files (SSH, The Secure Shell)
configuration failure: 12.2.3.4. Per-account authorization files (SSH, The Secure Shell)
per-account configuration: 4.1.5. Compile-Time Configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
5.3. Server Configuration: An Overview (SSH, The Secure Shell)
8. Per-Account Server Configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
authentication issues: 8.1.2. Authentication Issues (SSH, The Secure Shell)
authentication using PGP (SSH2): 8.2.2.1. SSH2 PGP key authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
CVS: 8.2.6.1. Example: CVS and $LOGNAME (SSH, The Secure Shell)
disabling agent forwarding: 8.2.8. Disabling Forwarding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
disabling port forwarding: 8.2.8. Disabling Forwarding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
"from" option (SSH1, OpenSSH): 8.2.5. Restricting Access by Host or Domain (SSH, The Secure Shell)
limitations: 8.1. Limits of This Technique (SSH, The Secure Shell)
precedence: 8.1.1. Overriding Serverwide Settings (SSH, The Secure Shell)
public key based: 8.2. Public Key-Based Configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
rc file: 8.4. The User rc File (SSH, The Secure Shell)
recommended settings: 10.4. Per-Account Configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
restriction of access by host or domain: 8.2.5. Restricting Access by Host or Domain (SSH, The Secure Shell)
server: 0.4. Our Approach (SSH, The Secure Shell)
setting idle timeouts: 8.2.7. Setting Idle Timeout (SSH, The Secure Shell)
trusted-host authentication: 8.3. Trusted-Host Access Control (SSH, The Secure Shell)
perfect forward secrecy: 3.4.1. Establishing the Secure Connection (SSH, The Secure Shell)
perfmon monitoring tool: 8.6. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
perfmon utility (Windows): 11.2.2. Added Extensibility for Windows NT (Essential SNMP)
performance
address translation: 4.2.1. Obtaining an IP Address (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Apache, directives: 11.3.7. Performance Tuning Directives (TCP/IP Network Administration)
avoiding bogus name servers and: 10.11. Avoiding a Bogus Name Server (DNS and Bind)
benchmarking: 16.3. Benchmarking (Managing NFS and NIS)
capacity planning and: 8.1.2. Capacity Planning (DNS and Bind)
connectivity loss: 14.3.8. Loss of Network Connectivity (DNS and Bind)
14.3.8. Loss of Network Connectivity (DNS and Bind)
debugging levels and: 13.1. Debugging Levels (DNS and Bind)
DNSSEC and: 11.4.7. DNSSEC and Performance (DNS and Bind)
I/O threads, asynchronous: 7.2. NFS protocol and implementation (Managing NFS and NIS)
mail exchangers and: 5.2. What's a Mail Exchanger, Again? (DNS and Bind)
monitoring name servers: 7.6. Keeping Everything Running Smoothly (DNS and Bind)
MX records and: 16.3. A Limitation of MX Records (DNS and Bind)
NFS, bottlenecks: 16.4. Identifying NFS performance bottlenecks (Managing NFS and NIS)
packet fragmentation, avoiding: 6.1.6.5. Maximum transmission unit (TCP/IP Network Administration)
queries per second: 7.6.2.3. Using the BIND statistics (DNS and Bind)
round robin load distribution and: 10.7. Round Robin Load Distribution (DNS and Bind)
security and: 12.5.5.4. Security and performance (Managing NFS and NIS)
server compensation, slow: 18.1. Slow server compensation (Managing NFS and NIS)
system tuning and: 10.12. System Tuning (DNS and Bind)
troubleshooting: 14.7.4. Lookups Take a Long Time (DNS and Bind)
TTL and: 2.7.1. Time to Live (DNS and Bind)
zone transfers, improving efficiency of: 10.12.1.6. More efficient zone transfers (DNS and Bind)
performance analysis
analytical modeling: 12.2.2. Performance Analysis and Monitoring (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
measurement: 12.2.2. Performance Analysis and Monitoring (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
simulations: 12.2.2. Performance Analysis and Monitoring (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
steps in: 12.2.2. Performance Analysis and Monitoring (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Performance Endpoints software: 4.3. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
performance management in network management software: 6.1.1. Characteristics of Management Software (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
performance measurement: 12.2.2. Performance Analysis and Monitoring (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
(see also performance analysis)
bandwidth: 4.2. Path Performance (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
4.2.2. Bandwidth Measurements (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
books and resources: B.2.4. Performance (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
bottleneck analysis: 12.2.2.2. Bottleneck analysis (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
in capacity planning: 12.2.2.3. Capacity planning (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
choosing tools: 12.2.2.1. General steps (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
emulators and simulators: 9.2. Network Emulators and Simulators (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
host-monitoring tools: 8.2. Host-Monitoring Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
ISPs: 4.2.3.4. Other related tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
load generators: 9.1.2. Load Generators (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Microsoft Windows: 4.3. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
8.6. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
mrtg and varieties: 8.4.1. mrtg (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
network-monitoring tools: 8.4. Network-Monitoring Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
over time: 8.1. What, When, and Where (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
packet injection: 9.1. Packet Injection Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
path performance: 4.2. Path Performance (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
ping tools: 3.3.2.3. Options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
point-monitoring tools: 8.3. Point-Monitoring Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
reproducibility: 9.2. Network Emulators and Simulators (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
RMON: 8.5. RMON (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
steps in: 12.2.2.1. General steps (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
terminology: 4.2.1. Performance Measurements (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
throughput: 4.2. Path Performance (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
4.2.3. Throughput Measurements (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
traffic measurement: 4.2. Path Performance (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
4.2.4. Traffic Measurements with netstat (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
8.1. What, When, and Where (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
types of data collection: 8.1. What, When, and Where (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
understanding current behavior: 1.2. Need for Troubleshooting Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
web servers: 10.1.2. HTTP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
performance measuring: 16.2. Measuring performance (Managing NFS and NIS)
Performance Monitor: 22.1.4. Performance Monitor and Network Monitor (Building Internet Firewalls)
Performance Monitor tool: 8.6. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
performance registry: 11.2.2. Added Extensibility for Windows NT (Essential SNMP)
performance statistics (MIB-II groups): 2.5. A Closer Look at MIB-II (Essential SNMP)
performance tuning: 13. Network Diagnostic and Administrative Tools (Managing NFS and NIS)
bottlenecks: 17. Network Performance Analysis (Managing NFS and NIS)
client-side: 18. Client-Side Performance Tuning (Managing NFS and NIS)
measuring efforts: 16.2. Measuring performance (Managing NFS and NIS)
server-side: 16. Server-Side Performance Tuning (Managing NFS and NIS)
servers: 16.5. Server tuning (Managing NFS and NIS)
buffers: 16.5.3. Memory usage (Managing NFS and NIS)
CPU loading: 16.5.1. CPU loading (Managing NFS and NIS)
cross-mounting filesystem: 16.5.6. Cross-mounting filesystems (Managing NFS and NIS)
kernel configuration: 16.5.5. Kernel configuration (Managing NFS and NIS)
memory usage: 16.5.3. Memory usage (Managing NFS and NIS)
multihomed: 16.5.7. Multihomed servers (Managing NFS and NIS)
nfsd threads: 16.5.2. NFS server threads (Managing NFS and NIS)
throughput: 16.5.4. Disk and filesystem throughput (Managing NFS and NIS)
performance, with multiple interior routers: 6.5.5. It's Dangerous to Use Multiple Interior Routers (Building Internet Firewalls)
perimeter networks: 5.1. Some Firewall Definitions (Building Internet Firewalls)
6.3.1. Perimeter Network (Building Internet Firewalls)
shared: 6.7.5. A Shared Perimeter Network Allows an "Arms-Length"Relationship (Building Internet Firewalls)
perimeter networks (firewalls): 12.7. Firewalls (TCP/IP Network Administration)
periodic replacement costs: 1.3.2.4. Economic considerations (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Perl: 5.5. Supporting Software (Essential SNMP)
Active Perl web site: 8.6.1. ntop, mrtg, and cricket on Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
books and resources: B.2.8. Scripting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
cricket and: 8.6.1. ntop, mrtg, and cricket on Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
disk status script: 12.4. Veritas Disk Check (Essential SNMP)
get operations: 8.1. Retrieving a Single MIB Value (Essential SNMP)
h2n utility written in: 7.2.5. Generating Zone Data Files from the Host Table (DNS and Bind)
identifying version of: 13.1. Using MRTG (Essential SNMP)
internal polling scripts: 9.1. Internal Polling (Essential SNMP)
MIB management routines: E.1. MIB Management Routines (Essential SNMP)
monitoring traps with: 10.2.7. Monitoring Traps with Perl (Essential SNMP)
monitoring users and processes: 13.4. Other Data-Gathering Applications (Essential SNMP)
MRTG and: 13.1. Using MRTG (Essential SNMP)
Net\:\:DNS module, programming with: 15.3. Perl Programming with Net::DNS (DNS and Bind)
parameters: E.2. SNMP Operations (Essential SNMP)
querying SystemEDGE extensible agent: 11.2.1. Extensibility for Unix and Windows NT (Essential SNMP)
scripting with: 6.4. Scripts (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
sending traps: 10.3.2. Sending Traps with Perl (Essential SNMP)
12.1. General Trap-Generation Program (Essential SNMP)
set operations: 8.3. Setting a MIB Value (Essential SNMP)
SNMP operations: E.2. SNMP Operations (Essential SNMP)
SNMP Perl module: 8.1. Retrieving a Single MIB Value (Essential SNMP)
E. SNMP Support for Perl (Essential SNMP)
SNMP Support for Perl: 5.5. Supporting Software (Essential SNMP)
10.2.7. Monitoring Traps with Perl (Essential SNMP)
snmpconf script: C.3.13. snmpconf (Essential SNMP)
SNMP_util module: E. SNMP Support for Perl (Essential SNMP)
Socket.pm utility written in: 13.6. Tools (DNS and Bind)
throw core script: 12.3. Throw Core (Essential SNMP)
use statements: E. SNMP Support for Perl (Essential SNMP)
vmstat script: B.1. Using External Data (Essential SNMP)
walk operations: 8.2. Retrieving Multiple MIB Values (Essential SNMP)
web site: 8.1. Retrieving a Single MIB Value (Essential SNMP)
permanent addresses
assigning (dhcpd.conf file): 9.5.1. dhcpd.conf (TCP/IP Network Administration)
fixed (DHCP): 3.6.2. Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
permanent entries, ARP table: 13.2.3. IP to MAC address mappings (Managing NFS and NIS)
permission checking, user information: 0. Preface (Managing NFS and NIS)
Permission Denied error message: 15.6. Asynchronous NFS error messages (Managing NFS and NIS)
permissions
for batch and cron jobs: 11.1.5.1. Least-privilege accounts (SSH, The Secure Shell)
for newly created files: 5.4.2.2. Permissions for newly created files (SSH, The Secure Shell)
mount points, incorrect (debugging case study): 15.5. Incorrect mount point permissions (Managing NFS and NIS)
PC/NFS: 10.4.2. Checking file permissions (Managing NFS and NIS)
revoking: 12.1.2. Enabling transparent access (Managing NFS and NIS)
tcpwrappers and: 11.2.3.1. tcpwrappers (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
PermitEmptyPasswords: 5.6.3. Empty Passwords (SSH, The Secure Shell)
PermitRootLogin: 5.5.2.5. Root access control (SSH, The Secure Shell)
persist option (pppd): A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
personal firewalls: 6.6. Politics and Security (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
personnel problems: 1.3.2.2. Ego management (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Peter Principle: 1.3.2.3. Legal and ethical considerations (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
p0f fingerprinting tool: 6.3.1. Stack Fingerprinting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
PGP (Pretty Good Privacy): 1.4.2. Secure File Transfer (SSH, The Secure Shell)
authentication: 5.5.1.6. PGP authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH2: 8.2.2.1. SSH2 PGP key authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
compile-time configuration: 4.1.5.7. Authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
key authentication
SSH2: 6.1.2. SSH2 Identities (SSH, The Secure Shell)
troubleshooting: 12.2.2.5. PGP key authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
OpenPGP compliance: 4.1.5.7. Authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
vs. SSH: 1.6.2. Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
PGP program: 12.4.3. Next Steps After Disabling Services (Building Internet Firewalls)
PGP signature of SSH distributions, verification: 4.1.2.2. Verifying with PGP (SSH, The Secure Shell)
PgpKeyFingerprint: 5.5.1.6. PGP authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
PgpKeyId: 5.5.1.6. PGP authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
PgpKeyName: 5.5.1.6. PGP authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
PgpPublicKeyFile: 5.5.1.6. PGP authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
PgpSecretKeyFile: 5.5.1.6. PGP authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
5.5.1.6. PGP authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ph (sendmail K command value): E.4.5. The sendmail K Command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
phquery mailer: E.3.5. MAILER (TCP/IP Network Administration)
physical devices, index numbers (ifconfig): 13.2.1.1. Examining interfaces (Managing NFS and NIS)
physical environment and cabling: 3.1.1. Installing New Cabling (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
physical-level addresses: 2.4. Extensions to the SMI in Version 2 (Essential SNMP)
physical link layer (7-layer model): 1.2. Physical and data link layers (Managing NFS and NIS)
physical network interface, netstat and: 17.1.1. Local network interface (Managing NFS and NIS)
physical network segments, IP network numbers: 1.3.5. Virtual interfaces (Managing NFS and NIS)
pid file: 5.3.3. Changing the Configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
OpenSSH: 4.3.5. Compilation Flags (SSH, The Secure Shell)
pid-file option (named): C.2.5. The options Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
PID option (xinetd): 12.5.2. Controlling Access with xinetd (TCP/IP Network Administration)
PidFile: 5.4.1.3. Process ID file (SSH, The Secure Shell)
5.4.2.2. Permissions for newly created files (SSH, The Secure Shell)
PidFile directive (httpd.conf file): 11.3.4. Defining Where Things Are Stored (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pie charts (SNMPc): 9.2.4. Castle Rock's SNMPc (Essential SNMP)
pin-outs: 3.1.3.2. Cable testers (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Pine: 11.3. Pine, IMAP, and SSH (SSH, The Secure Shell)
concurrent invocations: 11.3.3. Using a Connection Script (SSH, The Secure Shell)
configuring use of SSH instead of rsh: 11.3.1.2. Making Pine use SSH instead of rsh (SSH, The Secure Shell)
.k5login file: 11.4.5. Kerberos-4 in OpenSSH (SSH, The Secure Shell)
mail relaying with SSH: 11.3.2. Mail Relaying and News Access (SSH, The Secure Shell)
remote usernames: 11.3.1.2. Making Pine use SSH instead of rsh (SSH, The Secure Shell)
replacing rsh with ssh: 4.5.4. Pine (SSH, The Secure Shell)
securing IMAP authentication with SSH: 11.3.1. Securing IMAP Authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
.pinerc file, configuration: 11.3.1.2. Making Pine use SSH instead of rsh (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ping command: 1.5.2. Internet Control Message Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
4.2.6. Address and Alias Records (DNS and Bind)
2.9.3. Network Diagnostics (Building Internet Firewalls)
22.4.1. ping (Building Internet Firewalls)
diagnostic troubleshooting: 13.2. Diagnostic Tools (TCP/IP Network Administration)
implementing: 13.3.1. The ping Command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
polling only responsive devices: 12.5. Disk-Space Checker (Essential SNMP)
polling with: 6.1.3. Configuring Polling Intervals (Essential SNMP)
Remote Pinger: 11.2. SystemEDGE (Essential SNMP)
rotate option and: 6.1.6. The options Directive (DNS and Bind)
routing tables and: 7.2. The Minimal Routing Table (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SNMPc usage: 6.2.2. Discovery and Filters (Essential SNMP)
troubleshooting with: 13.3. Testing Basic Connectivity (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Ping of Death Attack: 3.3.3.3. Ping of Death (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
ping scanners: 6.2.1. IP Address Management (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
ping tools
alternatives to: 3.3.4. Alternatives to ping (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
bandwidth measurements: 4.2.2.1. ping revisited (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
checking client name resolution: 10.1.4. Name Services (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
cyberkit suite: 6.7.1. Cyberkit (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
detecting packet sniffers with: 5.7.2. Protecting Yourself (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
discovering MAC/IP address pairs: 6.2.1. IP Address Management (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
DOS attacks and: 3.3.3.1. Security and ICMP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
examples: 3.3.2.1. Simple examples (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
functions: 3.3.2. How ping Works (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
generating loads with: 9.1.2. Load Generators (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
graphing round-trip delays: 8.6.2. getif revisited (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
hping tool: 9.1.1.1. hping (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
interpreting results: 3.3.2.2. Interpreting results (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Microsoft Windows: 3.4. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
options: 3.3.2.3. Options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Ping of Death Attack: 3.3.3.3. Ping of Death (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
problems with: 3.3.3. Problems with ping (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
running: 3.3.2.4. Using ping (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
source web site: A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
source web sites: A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
testing connectivity with: 3.3. Software Testing with ping (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
versions: 3.3.1. ping (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
pinging
connectivity and: 13.2.4. Using ping to check network connectivity (Managing NFS and NIS)
testing network: 15. Debugging Network Problems (Managing NFS and NIS)
PIX firewalls: 7.3.6. Cisco Devices (Essential SNMP)
pkgadd command (Solaris): A.1.2. Solaris Packages (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
pkgadd command, Solaris device drivers: 5.1.1. Using Dynamically Loadable Modules (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pkgchk command (Solaris): A.1.2. Solaris Packages (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
pkginfo package command (Solaris): A.1.2. Solaris Packages (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
pkgrm command (Solaris): A.1.2. Solaris Packages (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
PKIX (Public-Key Infrastructure X.509): C.3.2. Certificates (Building Internet Firewalls)
plain text (clear text) strings: 7.2. Security Concerns (Essential SNMP)
plain text (MIME data subtype): 3.4.4. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (TCP/IP Network Administration)
plaintext: C.2.1. Encryption (Building Internet Firewalls)
3.2. A Cryptography Primer (SSH, The Secure Shell)
planning
capacity planning (see capacity planning)
performance analysis (see performance analysis)
platform architecture: 8.2. Setting up a diskless client (Managing NFS and NIS)
platforms: 0.3. Platforms (Building Internet Firewalls)
SSH implementations for: 0.6. Supported Platforms (SSH, The Secure Shell)
playback attacks: 13.1.4. False Authentication of Clients (Building Internet Firewalls)
playing back captured tcpdump data: 5.4.2.1. Controlling program behavior (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
plenum cabling: 3.1.1. Installing New Cabling (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
plotting traffic data (see graphing traffic data)
Plug and Play service: 12.4.4. Which Services Should You Leave Enabled? (Building Internet Firewalls)
plug-gw proxy: 9.6.3. Generic Proxying with TIS FWTK (Building Internet Firewalls)
plug-ins: 2.2.1. Web Client Security Issues (Building Internet Firewalls)
15.2.2. External Viewers (Building Internet Firewalls)
SystemEDGE: 7.3.5.2. Advanced configuration (Essential SNMP)
Pluggable Authentication Modules (PAM): 21.4.2. Pluggable Authentication Modules (PAM) (Building Internet Firewalls)
plugin option (pppd): A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
plugins for ntop tool: 8.3.1.2. Web mode (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
PlugPlayServiceType registry key: 12.4.1.1. Registry keys (Building Internet Firewalls)
plumb option (loopback interface configuration): 6.1.1. The Interface Name (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pmd (Postmaster daemon): 10.2.1. HP OpenView (Essential SNMP)
pmon.exe tool: 2.3. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
point-monitoring tools: 8.1. What, When, and Where (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
8.3. Point-Monitoring Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
ntop: 8.3.1. ntop (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Windows: 8.6. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
point-to-point bandwidth: 4.2.2.3. bing (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
point-to-point connections, defining (ifconfig command): 6.1.6.6. Point-to-point (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP): 14.11. Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) (Building Internet Firewalls)
point tools: 6.1.2. Discovery and Mapping Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Pointcast program: 15.6. Push Technologies (Building Internet Firewalls)
pointer queries: 7.6.2.1. BIND 4.9 and 8 statistics (DNS and Bind)
pointer records (see PTR records)
pointers: 3.3.2. Creating Domains and Subdomains (TCP/IP Network Administration)
name server record: 3.3.2. Creating Domains and Subdomains (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pointopoint (gated): B.6. Interface Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
POINTTOPOINT flag, ifconfig: 13.2.1.1. Examining interfaces (Managing NFS and NIS)
poison reverse (routing): 7.4.1.1. Running RIP with routed (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Poisson distribution: 9.1.2.2. MGEN (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
policies
for networks: 1.3.1. Documentation (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
routing, BGP and: 7.5.2. Border Gateway Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
security, creating: 12.1.3. Writing a Security Policy (TCP/IP Network Administration)
setting for different systems: 3.1. Masters, slaves, and clients (Managing NFS and NIS)
policy (gated): B.4. Trace Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
policy routing database (NFSnet): 2.3. Internet Routing Architecture (TCP/IP Network Administration)
policy, security (see security, policies for)
poll intervals: 9. Polling and Thresholds (Essential SNMP)
factors in: 9. Polling and Thresholds (Essential SNMP)
Net-SNMP (snmpdelta): C.3.7. snmpdelta (Essential SNMP)
OpenView
NNM: 6.1.3. Configuring Polling Intervals (Essential SNMP)
9.2.3.1. Designing collections (Essential SNMP)
xnmgraph: 9.2.2. OpenView Graphing (Essential SNMP)
9.2.2. OpenView Graphing (Essential SNMP)
9.2.2. OpenView Graphing (Essential SNMP)
RMON: 9.1.1.1. RMON configuration (Essential SNMP)
SNMPc: 6.2.2. Discovery and Filters (Essential SNMP)
9.2.4. Castle Rock's SNMPc (Essential SNMP)
SystemEDGE: 7.3.5.2. Advanced configuration (Essential SNMP)
polling
agents and: 7.3.5.2. Advanced configuration (Essential SNMP)
9.1. Internal Polling (Essential SNMP)
calculating data-storage requirements: 3.1. Hardware Considerations (Essential SNMP)
DHCP options: 6.1.2. The netmon Process (Essential SNMP)
distributing: 9.2. External Polling (Essential SNMP)
external polling: 9. Polling and Thresholds (Essential SNMP)
9.2. External Polling (Essential SNMP)
falling behind: 6.1.3. Configuring Polling Intervals (Essential SNMP)
filters in NNM: 6.1.5. Using OpenView Filters (Essential SNMP)
get operations: 2.6.1. The get Operation (Essential SNMP)
8. Polling and Setting (Essential SNMP)
instance numbers and: 9.1.1.1. RMON configuration (Essential SNMP)
internal polling: 9. Polling and Thresholds (Essential SNMP)
9.1. Internal Polling (Essential SNMP)
intervals (see poll intervals)
learning periods: 9.2.4. Castle Rock's SNMPc (Essential SNMP)
MRTG: 13. MRTG (Essential SNMP)
13.1. Using MRTG (Essential SNMP)
Net-SNMP: 8.1.2. Using Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
network congestion and: 9. Polling and Thresholds (Essential SNMP)
non-SNMP devices: 13.4. Other Data-Gathering Applications (Essential SNMP)
by object type: 9.2.2. OpenView Graphing (Essential SNMP)
OpenView: 8.1.1. Using HP OpenView to Retrieve Values (Essential SNMP)
data collection: 9.2.3. OpenView Data Collection and Thresholds (Essential SNMP)
designing collections: 9.2.3.1. Designing collections (Essential SNMP)
graphing: 9.2.2. OpenView Graphing (Essential SNMP)
intervals: 6.1.3. Configuring Polling Intervals (Essential SNMP)
9.2.2. OpenView Graphing (Essential SNMP)
limiting: 9.2.3.1. Designing collections (Essential SNMP)
netmon: 6.1.2. The netmon Process (Essential SNMP)
polling.pl script: 12.5. Disk-Space Checker (Essential SNMP)
over the Internet: 3.2. NMS Architectures (Essential SNMP)
Perl: 8.1. Retrieving a Single MIB Value (Essential SNMP)
ports: 2.1. SNMP and UDP (Essential SNMP)
program hooks and: 9.1. Internal Polling (Essential SNMP)
RMON: 9.1.1. Remote Monitoring (RMON) (Essential SNMP)
servers: 12.5. Disk-Space Checker (Essential SNMP)
SNMPc: 6.2.2. Discovery and Filters (Essential SNMP)
9.2.4. Castle Rock's SNMPc (Essential SNMP)
testing events: 9.2.3.2. Creating a threshold (Essential SNMP)
thresholds and: 9. Polling and Thresholds (Essential SNMP)
9.2.3.2. Creating a threshold (Essential SNMP)
9.2.4. Castle Rock's SNMPc (Essential SNMP)
traffic and: 6.1.5. Using OpenView Filters (Essential SNMP)
trap-directed: 3.2. NMS Architectures (Essential SNMP)
useless objects: 9.2.2. OpenView Graphing (Essential SNMP)
polling with tkined: 7.2.3.1. ICMP monitoring (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
7.2.3.5. Other commands (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
polls (EGP): 7.5.1. Exterior Gateway Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pools, IPv6 addresses: 1.3.6.1. IP Version 6 address pools (Managing NFS and NIS)
POP2 and POP3 protocols: 6.3. Device Identification (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
6.3. Device Identification (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
10.1.1. Email (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
POP (Post Office Protocol): 16.6. Post Office Protocol (POP) (Building Internet Firewalls)
2.3.1. Electronic Mail (Building Internet Firewalls)
3.4.2. Post Office Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
commands: 3.4.2. Post Office Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
MAILER command: E.3.5. MAILER (TCP/IP Network Administration)
servers, configuring: 9.7.1. POP Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pop-up messages: 10.2.2.4. Log messages, notifications, and automatic actions (Essential SNMP)
Port: 5.2.2. Running as an Ordinary User (SSH, The Secure Shell)
5.4.3.1. Port number and network interface (SSH, The Secure Shell)
7.4.4.1. Selecting a remote port (SSH, The Secure Shell)
recommended setting: 10.3.2. /etc/sshd_config (SSH, The Secure Shell)
port 0: 9.1.1.1. hping (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
port collections: A.1.4. FreeBSD Ports (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
port command (dip): 6.3.2. Dial-Up PPP (TCP/IP Network Administration)
A.1.1. The dip Script File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
port conflicts, avoiding: 12.1.2. Server Debugging (SSH, The Secure Shell)
Port directive (httpd.conf file): 11.3.2. Basic Configuration Directives (TCP/IP Network Administration)
port forwarding: 1.4.6. Port Forwarding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
3.1.5. Forwarding ( Tunneling) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
9. Port Forwarding and X Forwarding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
9.2. Port Forwarding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
between Pine and IMAP host, security risks: 11.3.1. Securing IMAP Authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
compile-time configuration: 4.1.5.5. TCP port forwarding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
9.2.10.1. Compile-time configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
disabling: 8.2.8. Disabling Forwarding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
firewalls, bypassing: 9.2.5. Bypassing a Firewall (SSH, The Secure Shell)
gateway hosts: 11.5.1. Making Transparent SSH Connections (SSH, The Secure Shell)
listening port numbers: 9.2.7. The Listening Port Number (SSH, The Secure Shell)
listing connections, escape sequence for: 2.3.2. The Escape Character (SSH, The Secure Shell)
local compared to remote: 9.2.3. Comparing Local and Remote PortForwarding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
local forwarding: 9.2.1. Local Forwarding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
9.2.3.2. Local versus remote forwarding: the distinction (SSH, The Secure Shell)
and GatewayPorts: 9.2.1.1. Local forwarding and GatewayPorts (SSH, The Secure Shell)
localhost issues: 9.2.4. Forwarding Off-Host (SSH, The Secure Shell)
multiple connections: 9.2.2. Trouble with Multiple Connections (SSH, The Secure Shell)
non TCP-based protocols: 9.2. Port Forwarding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
off-host: 9.2.4. Forwarding Off-Host (SSH, The Secure Shell)
per-account configuration: 9.2.10.3. Per-account configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
"bind\: Address already in use" message: 12.2.5.6. Port forwarding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
recommended setting: 10.3.2. /etc/sshd_config (SSH, The Secure Shell)
remote forwarding: 9.2.3.2. Local versus remote forwarding: the distinction (SSH, The Secure Shell)
server configuration: 9.2.10. Configuring Port Forwarding in the Server (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SMTP and NNTP connections: 11.3.2. Mail Relaying and News Access (SSH, The Secure Shell)
port forwarding 18.2.5.6. Port forwarding (Building Internet Firewalls)
SSH-in-SSH: 11.5.3. Another Approach: SSH-in-SSH(Port Forwarding) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
suspending, escape sequence for: 2.3.2. The Escape Character (SSH, The Secure Shell)
target address: 9.2.8. Choosing the Target Forwarding Address (SSH, The Secure Shell)
termination: 9.2.9. Termination (SSH, The Secure Shell)
TIME_WAIT: 9.2.9.1. The TIME_WAIT problem (SSH, The Secure Shell)
without remote logins: 9.2.6. Port Forwarding Without a Remote Login (SSH, The Secure Shell)
port monitoring, security and: 12.4.6. Port monitoring (Managing NFS and NIS)
port (named): C.2.5.1. The BIND 9 options statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
port number: 1.4.2. Port numbers (Managing NFS and NIS)
port numbers: 7.4.4.1. Selecting a remote port (SSH, The Secure Shell)
9.2.1. Local Forwarding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
2.6. Protocols, Ports, and Sockets (TCP/IP Network Administration)
2.6.2. Port Numbers (TCP/IP Network Administration)
2.6.2. Port Numbers (TCP/IP Network Administration)
assigned: 13.4.4. Assigned Ports (Building Internet Firewalls)
finding: 13.3. Analyzing Other Protocols (Building Internet Firewalls)
client: 13. Internet Services and Firewalls (Building Internet Firewalls)
data delivery: 2.1. Addressing, Routing, and Multiplexing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
encoding: 9.2.7. The Listening Port Number (SSH, The Secure Shell)
listening: 9.2.7. The Listening Port Number (SSH, The Secure Shell)
setting: 14.1.3. Packet Filtering Characteristics of RPC (Building Internet Firewalls)
Unix: 2.6.2. Port Numbers (TCP/IP Network Administration)
port option (nslookup): 12.3. Option Settings (DNS and Bind)
port= option (vfstab file): 9.1.3.2. The vfstab and fstab files (TCP/IP Network Administration)
port parameter (gated): B.8.6. The smux Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
port scanners: 2.1.7. Scanning Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
identifying hardware with: 6.3. Device Identification (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
nmap tool: 6.2.2. nmap (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Windows tools: 2.3. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
port unreachable message: 6.1.4.1. One name server configured (DNS and Bind)
15.1.1. A Typical Problem (DNS and Bind)
resolvers and: 8.5.1. Outages (DNS and Bind)
portable computers: 5.2. Access to Traffic (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
portable hubs: 5.2. Access to Traffic (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
portmap: 1.5.3. Internet and RPC server configuration (Managing NFS and NIS)
portmap NFS daemon: 10.1.6. NFS (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
portmap service: 11.3.4.2. Other RPC services (Building Internet Firewalls)
11.3.4.2. Other RPC services (Building Internet Firewalls)
B.5.7. portmap (Building Internet Firewalls)
portmapper: 2.6.2. Port Numbers (TCP/IP Network Administration)
1.5.3. Internet and RPC server configuration (Managing NFS and NIS)
10.1.6. NFS (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
RPC services and: 13.3.1.2. RPC portmapper — rpcbind (Managing NFS and NIS)
versions: 13.3.1.3. RPC version numbers (Managing NFS and NIS)
portmapper server: 14.1. Remote Procedure Call (RPC) (Building Internet Firewalls)
17.3.6. Packet Filtering Characteristics of NFS (Building Internet Firewalls)
ports: 10.15. Addresses and Ports (DNS and Bind)
1.2. A Data Communications Model (TCP/IP Network Administration)
aliasing: 5.2. Access to Traffic (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
DHCP: 3.6.2.1. How DHCP works (TCP/IP Network Administration)
displaying numbers for connections: 2.1.3. netstat (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
DNS: 3.3. DNS (TCP/IP Network Administration)
duplicating traffic on: 5.2. Access to Traffic (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
ephemeral: 5.4.2.4.4. Compound filters. (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
5.5.3. tcpflow (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
filtering: 5.4.2.4.2. Protocol and port filtering. (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
5.4.2.4.4. Compound filters. (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
getif results: 7.4.2. SNMP Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
graphing usage by: 8.3.1.2. Web mode (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
IMAP: 3.4.3. Internet Message Access Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
instance numbers: 9.1.1.1. RMON configuration (Essential SNMP)
listing numbers: 12.6. Port Monitor (Essential SNMP)
management ports on UPSs: 7.3.7. APC Symetra (Essential SNMP)
MGEN packet settings: 9.1.2.2. MGEN (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
mirroring: 5.2. Access to Traffic (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
monitoring scripts: 12.6. Port Monitor (Essential SNMP)
mrtg setting: 8.4.2. rrd and the Future of mrtg (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
nemesis settings: 9.1.1.2. nemesis (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
network address translation: 5.4.2.5. Dynamic allocation of ports may interfere with packet filtering (Building Internet Firewalls)
NNM Port settings: 6.1.3. Configuring Polling Intervals (Essential SNMP)
nonprivileged, forcing: 7.4.4.2. Forcing a nonprivileged local port (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ntop selection: 8.3.1.2. Web mode (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
POP: 3.4.2. Post Office Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
preserving numbers in data: 5.5.2. tcpdpriv (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
remote, selecting: 7.4.4.1. Selecting a remote port (SSH, The Secure Shell)
scanning (see port scanners)
7.4.2. SNMP Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
sendmail: 10.2. Running sendmail as a Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SMTP: 3.4.1. Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
source, filtering by: 8.7.4. Risks of Filtering by Source Port (Building Internet Firewalls)
telnet information at login: 6.3. Device Identification (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
traceroute starting ports: 4.1.1. Options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
UDP: 2.1. SNMP and UDP (Essential SNMP)
portscan scanning tool: 2.1.7. Scanning Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
11.4. Security Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
PortSentry (automated system monitoring): 12.4.3. Automated Monitoring (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Positive Acknowledgment with Re-transmission (PAR): 1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
posix option (vfstab file): 9.1.3.2. The vfstab and fstab files (TCP/IP Network Administration)
postfix notation: A. Using Input and Output Octets (Essential SNMP)
Postfix program: 16.2.8.2. Postfix (Building Internet Firewalls)
postmaster as email address: 4.2.4. SOA Records (DNS and Bind)
Postmaster daemon (pmd): 10.2.1. HP OpenView (Essential SNMP)
PostScript
files: 15.2.2. External Viewers (Building Internet Firewalls)
printers, attacks from: 17.6. Printing Protocols (Building Internet Firewalls)
PostScript (MIME data subtype): 3.4.4. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pound sign (#) starting comments: 4.3. Setting Up a BIND Configuration File (DNS and Bind)
in resolv.conf file: 6.1.7. Comments (DNS and Bind)
power lines, cabling and: 3.1.1. Installing New Cabling (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
power outages: 8.5.1. Outages (DNS and Bind)
PPP (Point-to-Point Protocol): 14.11. Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) (Building Internet Firewalls)
3.3.2.3. Options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
B.2.3. Specific Protocols (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
BSD Unix support: 5.1.5.2. The pseudo-device statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
chat scripts: 6.3.3. chat (TCP/IP Network Administration)
configuring Solaris: 6.3.6. Solaris PPP (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dialup connections, configuring: 6.3.2. Dial-Up PPP (TCP/IP Network Administration)
installing: 6.3. Installing PPP (TCP/IP Network Administration)
overview: 6.2.1. The Serial Protocols (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pppd command: 6.3.1. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
security: 6.3.4. PPP Daemon Security (TCP/IP Network Administration)
servers, configuring: 6.3.5. PPP Server Configuration (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pppd command: 6.3.1. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
authentication protocols: 6.3.4. PPP Daemon Security (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dedicated connection configuration: 6.3.1. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
invoking dial-up scripts: 6.3.3. chat (TCP/IP Network Administration)
options: 6.3.1. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
PPP servers, configuring: 6.3.5. PPP Server Configuration (TCP/IP Network Administration)
security: 6.3.4. PPP Daemon Security (TCP/IP Network Administration)
signal processing: A.2.1. Signal Processing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
syntax: A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
ppp/options file: 6.3.1. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
ppp/options.device file: 6.3.1. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
ppprc file (ppd): 6.3.1. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Practical Extraction and Report Language (see Perl)
PRDB (policy routing database): 2.3. Internet Routing Architecture (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pre-image-resistance of hash functions: 3.2.3. Hash Functions (SSH, The Secure Shell)
precedence command (sendmail): 10.5.6. Defining Mail Precedence (TCP/IP Network Administration)
precedence in operators: 5.4.2.4.4. Compound filters. (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
precedence, serverwide configuration: 5.3.2. Command-Line Options (SSH, The Secure Shell)
precompiled binary files: A.1.1. Generic Installs (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
predictor1 option (pppd): A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
preference parameter: B.6. Interface Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
gated aggregate statement: B.11. Aggregate Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
gated bgp statement: B.8.4. The bgp Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
gated egp statement: B.8.5. The egp Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
gated isis statement: B.8.3. The isis Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
gated rip statement: B.8.2. The rip Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
gated routerdiscovery statement: B.8.9. The routerdiscovery Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
gated static statements: B.9. static Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
preference values: 5.1. MX Records (DNS and Bind)
discarding MX records and: 5.3. The MX Algorithm (DNS and Bind)
increments for: 5.3. The MX Algorithm (DNS and Bind)
prefix-length (IP addresses): 2.2.1. Address Structure (TCP/IP Network Administration)
prefixes, Ethernet interface: 13.2.3. IP to MAC address mappings (Managing NFS and NIS)
prereq commands (nsupdate): 10.2. DNS Dynamic Update (DNS and Bind)
presentation layer (7-layer model): 1.5. The session and presentation layers (Managing NFS and NIS)
Presentation Layer (OSI Model): 1.2. A Data Communications Model (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Prestoserve: 16.5.4.2. Disk array caching and Prestoserve (Managing NFS and NIS)
preventing disasters (see troubleshooting, preventing and handling disasters)
primaries (see primary master name servers)
primary configuration file line (BIND4): 4.3. Setting Up a BIND Configuration File (DNS and Bind)
4.4.1. Appending Domain Names (DNS and Bind)
primary directive: E.2.2. primary (DNS and Bind)
adding: 4.9. Adding More Zones (DNS and Bind)
primary master (see primary master name server)
primary master name server: 2.4.2. Types of Name Servers (DNS and Bind)
2.4.2. Types of Name Servers (DNS and Bind)
adding: 8.2.1. Primary Master and Slave Servers (DNS and Bind)
BIND configuration file for (example): 4.3. Setting Up a BIND Configuration File (DNS and Bind)
forgetting to signal: 14.3.2. Forgot to Reload Primary Master Name Server (DNS and Bind)
forwarders and: 10.5. Forwarding (DNS and Bind)
multiple: 4.8.4. Multiple Master Servers (DNS and Bind)
primary master vs. slave: 4.9. Adding More Zones (DNS and Bind)
reloading, command for: 7.1.1. ndc and controls (BIND 8) (DNS and Bind)
running: 4.7. Running a Primary Master Name Server (DNS and Bind)
slave name servers and: 4.8. Running a Slave Name Server (DNS and Bind)
when running large numbers of: 8.2. Adding More Name Servers (DNS and Bind)
starting up: 4.7.1. Starting Up the Name Server (DNS and Bind)
automatically: 4.7.4. Editing the Startup Files (DNS and Bind)
testing with nslookup: 4.7.3. Testing Your Setup with nslookup (DNS and Bind)
unreachable message and: 7.6.1. Common Syslog Messages (DNS and Bind)
primary servers: 3.3.4. BIND, Resolvers, and named (TCP/IP Network Administration)
PrincipleName field, NFS log record: 14.6. NFS server logging (Managing NFS and NIS)
print command (dip): A.1.1. The dip Script File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
print jobs, commands: 9.2.1.2. Using LPD (TCP/IP Network Administration)
print servers: 3.5.2. Print Services (TCP/IP Network Administration)
network services, print servers: 4.5.2. Print Servers (TCP/IP Network Administration)
printcap file: 9.2.1.1. The printcap file (TCP/IP Network Administration)
printcap name parameter (smb.config file): 9.3.1. Configuring a Samba Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
printconf-gui: 9.2.1.1. The printcap file (TCP/IP Network Administration)
printed documentation: B.1. Sources of Information (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Printer Driver field (printconf-gui): 9.2.1.1. The printcap file (TCP/IP Network Administration)
printer services
Line Printer, configuring: 9.2.2. Line Printer Service (TCP/IP Network Administration)
lpd: 9.2.1. Line Printer Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
printcap file: 9.2.1.1. The printcap file (TCP/IP Network Administration)
lpr command: 9.2.1.2. Using LPD (TCP/IP Network Administration)
overview: 9.2. Sharing Unix Printers (TCP/IP Network Administration)
printers, sharing, Samba: 9.3.1.3. Sharing printers through Samba (TCP/IP Network Administration)
printing: 3.1. Least Privilege (Building Internet Firewalls)
17.6. Printing Protocols (Building Internet Firewalls)
Hewlett-Packard printers: 17.6.3. Other Printing Systems (Building Internet Firewalls)
PostScript printers: 17.6. Printing Protocols (Building Internet Firewalls)
screen shots of windows: 11.1.1. Automating Documentation (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
systems: 2.4.3. Printing Systems (Building Internet Firewalls)
troubleshooting details: 11.1.1. Automating Documentation (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Windows-based: 17.6.2. Windows-based Printing (Building Internet Firewalls)
printing (Net-SNMP)
OID trees: C.3.15. snmptranslate (Essential SNMP)
OIDs: C.2. Common Command-Line Arguments (Essential SNMP)
status information: C.3.10. snmpstatus (Essential SNMP)
printing parameter (smb.config file): 9.3.1. Configuring a Samba Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
printing, PC/NFS: 10.5. Printer services (Managing NFS and NIS)
PrintMotd: 5.6.1. Welcome Messages for the User (SSH, The Secure Shell)
priorities for traffic: 3.3.3.4. Other problems (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
privacy: 3.1.1. Privacy (Encryption) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
privacy issues
egos and: 1.3.2.2. Ego management (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
limiting bytes captured and: 5.4.2.1. Controlling program behavior (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
packet capture and: 5. Packet Capture (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
sanitize tool: 5.5.1. sanitize (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
segmented networks and: 5.2. Access to Traffic (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
TCP streams and: 5.6.1.1. Using ethereal (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
tcpdpriv tool: 5.5.2. tcpdpriv (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
use of network tools and: 1.3.2.3. Legal and ethical considerations (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
privacy services
configuring: F.2.1. Configuring SNMPv3 for a Cisco Router (Essential SNMP)
F.2.2. Configuring SNMPv3 for Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
default configuration: F.2.2.2. Simplifying commands by setting defaults (Essential SNMP)
keys: F.1.4. SNMPv3 Textual Conventions (Essential SNMP)
SNMPv3: F.1.1. The SNMPv3 Engine (Essential SNMP)
F.1.4. SNMPv3 Textual Conventions (Essential SNMP)
F.2.2. Configuring SNMPv3 for Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
private enterprise numbers: 2.3.1. Naming OIDs (Essential SNMP)
2.3.1. Naming OIDs (Essential SNMP)
private events (OpenView): 10.2.6. Creating Events Within OpenView (Essential SNMP)
private key: 12.6. Encryption (TCP/IP Network Administration)
private keys: 2.4.1. A Brief Introduction to Keys (SSH, The Secure Shell)
6.1. What Is an Identity? (SSH, The Secure Shell)
importance of secrecy: 2.4.2. Generating Key Pairs with ssh-keygen (SSH, The Secure Shell)
keyserv daemon: 12.5.4.8. Establishing a session key (Managing NFS and NIS)
NFS security: 12.5.4.6. Public and private keys (Managing NFS and NIS)
plaintext authentication, batch or cron jobs: 11.1.2.2. Using a plaintext key (SSH, The Secure Shell)
private links in NMS architecture: 3.2. NMS Architectures (Essential SNMP)
private MIBs: 2.3.1. Naming OIDs (Essential SNMP)
4.1. What Does SNMP-Compatible Really Mean? (Essential SNMP)
11.2.1. Extensibility for Unix and Windows NT (Essential SNMP)
7.1. Overview of SNMP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
7.2.1.5. snmptranslate (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
7.2.3.3. Examining MIBs (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
private networks: 4.1. Connected and Non-Connected Networks (TCP/IP Network Administration)
private newsgroups: 2.3.2. Usenet News (Building Internet Firewalls)
privgroup option (pppd): A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
privileged ports: 1.6.1. rsh Suite (R-Commands) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
Trusted-host authentication (Rhosts and RhostsRSA) (SSH, The Secure Shell) 3.4.2.3.
privileges, root: 16.2.7. Sendmail (Building Internet Firewalls)
PRNG (pseudo-random number generators): 3.7. Randomness (SSH, The Secure Shell)
pro domain: 3.3.1. The Domain Hierarchy (TCP/IP Network Administration)
proactive nature of troubleshooting: 0. Preface (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
probe computers: 5.2. Access to Traffic (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
probes, responding to: 26.2.5. Responding to Probes (Building Internet Firewalls)
problem decomposition technique: 1.1. General Approaches to Troubleshooting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
procedure calls, NIS protocol: 3.3.9. The ypserv daemon (Managing NFS and NIS)
procedures for proxying, custom: 9.2.3. Using Proxy-Aware User Procedures for Proxying (Building Internet Firewalls)
procedures, RPC (NFS): 7.2.1. NFS RPC procedures (Managing NFS and NIS)
see also RPC: 7.2.1. NFS RPC procedures (Managing NFS and NIS)
process documentation: 1.3.1. Documentation (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
process explode tool: 2.3. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
process field (inittab file): 5.2.1.1. Understanding /etc/inittab (TCP/IP Network Administration)
process IDs: 7.1.3. Using Signals (DNS and Bind)
command for printing: 7.1.1. ndc and controls (BIND 8) (DNS and Bind)
process monitor tool: 2.3. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
process status command, httpd, locating: 11.1. Installing Apache Software (TCP/IP Network Administration)
process viewer tool: 2.3. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
processes
bottlenecks in: 12.2.2.2. Bottleneck analysis (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
checking for with Net-SNMP: 11.1. Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
defunct processes: 2.1.1. ps (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
graphing: 13.3. Graphing Other Objects (Essential SNMP)
httpd, managing: 11.3.3. Managing the Swarm (TCP/IP Network Administration)
initiated by vnc: 11.1.2. vnc (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
listing: 2.1.1. ps (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
2.1.4. lsof (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
2.1.4. lsof (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
2.3. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
listing usersÕ processes: 2.1.1. ps (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
lsof tool: 2.1.4. lsof (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
2.1.4. lsof (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
managing: 1.5. Host Management (Essential SNMP)
2.7. Host Management Revisited (Essential SNMP)
Microsoft Windows: 2.3. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
monitoring (SystemEDGE): 7.3.5.2. Advanced configuration (Essential SNMP)
multiple instances: 2.1.1. ps (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
ranking in order of CPU usage: 2.1.2. top (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
resource-hogging: 2.1.2. top (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
rogue processes: 2.1.1. ps (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
run levels and: 2.2.4. Startup Files and Scripts (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
SNMP agent information: 7.2.1.8. Agents and traps (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
processing email: 5.1. MX Records (DNS and Bind)
processing speed: 10.3.2. How Fast a Machine? (Building Internet Firewalls)
processor architecture: 8.2. Setting up a diskless client (Managing NFS and NIS)
processor load: 1.2.1. The History of the Domain Name System (DNS and Bind)
processor loads in SNMP agent information: 7.2.1.8. Agents and traps (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
procmail mailer: E.3.5. MAILER (TCP/IP Network Administration)
professionalism in network management: 1.3.2.1. Professionalism (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
profiles
NNM users: B.3. Profiles for Different Users (Essential SNMP)
shell profiles: 12.2. Who's Logging into My Machine? (I-Am-in) (Essential SNMP)
systemwide: 12.2. Who's Logging into My Machine? (I-Am-in) (Essential SNMP)
prog mailer: 10.5.8. Defining Mailers (TCP/IP Network Administration)
program numbers, RPC services: 13.3.1.1. Identifying RPC services (Managing NFS and NIS)
program (sendmail K command value): E.4.5. The sendmail K Command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
programming languages, web-related: 15.4. Mobile Code and Web-Related Languages (Building Internet Firewalls)
programming resolvers: 15. Programming with the Resolver and Name Server Library Routines (DNS and Bind)
with Perl: 15.3. Perl Programming with Net::DNS (DNS and Bind)
with C programming: 15.2. C Programming with the Resolver Library Routines (DNS and Bind)
programs (see applications)
uploading on HTTP servers: 15.1.1.2. Running unexpected external programs (Building Internet Firewalls)
evaluating security of: 13.5. Choosing Security-Critical Programs (Building Internet Firewalls)
external
on HTTP clients: 15.2.3. Extension Systems (Building Internet Firewalls)
on HTTP servers: 15.1.1. HTTP Extensions (Building Internet Firewalls)
obtaining examples of: 0.5. Obtaining the Example Programs (DNS and Bind)
removing nonessential: 11.5.2. Remove Nonessential Programs (Building Internet Firewalls)
removing nonessential on Windows NT: 12.4.3. Next Steps After Disabling Services (Building Internet Firewalls)
progress indicator: 6.2.2. Generating RSA/DSA Keys for SSH2 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
PROM password: 12.3.2. Making NIS more secure (Managing NFS and NIS)
promiscuous mode: 10.5. Locating Bastion Hosts on the Network (Building Internet Firewalls)
arpwatch tool: 6.2.3. arpwatch (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
checking interfaces: 5.7.2. Protecting Yourself (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
disabling in tcpdump: 5.4.2.1. Controlling program behavior (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
enabling and disabling: 6.1.6.3. Promiscuous mode (TCP/IP Network Administration)
ethereal settings: 5.6.1.1. Using ethereal (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
ntop tool: 8.3.1. ntop (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
packet capture and: 5.3. Capturing Data (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
propagation delays or times: 4.2.1. Performance Measurements (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
8.2.1. Primary Master and Slave Servers (DNS and Bind)
4.2.2.1. ping revisited (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
4.2.2.1. ping revisited (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
properties, replicas: 6.5.1. Properties of replicas (Managing NFS and NIS)
proposed standards (RFCs): 1.1.2. Protocol Standards (TCP/IP Network Administration)
proprietary MIBs: 1.4. The Structure of Management Information and MIBS (Essential SNMP)
proprietary WINS records: 14.5.1. Zone Transfer Fails Because of Proprietary WINS Record (DNS and Bind)
Protected Storage service: 12.4.4. Which Services Should You Leave Enabled? (Building Internet Firewalls)
protecting networks (see security issues)
5.7.2. Protecting Yourself (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
proto= option (vfstab file): 9.1.3.2. The vfstab and fstab files (TCP/IP Network Administration)
proto parameter (gated): B.11. Aggregate Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
protocol analyzers: 5.1. Traffic Capture Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
5.1. Traffic Capture Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
protocol checking: 8.1.3. Protocol Checking (Building Internet Firewalls)
Protocol Data Units (see PDUs)
protocol field (inet.conf file): 5.3. The Internet Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
protocol layer (7-layer model), broadcasts: 1.2.2. Ethernet addresses (Managing NFS and NIS)
protocol modification: 13.4.5. Protocol Security (Building Internet Firewalls)
protocol numbers: 2.6. Protocols, Ports, and Sockets (TCP/IP Network Administration)
2.6.1. Protocol Numbers (TCP/IP Network Administration)
datagram headers: 1.5.1.4. Passing datagrams to the transport layer (TCP/IP Network Administration)
protocol stack: 1.1. Networking overview (Managing NFS and NIS)
2.1. SNMP and UDP (Essential SNMP)
see also network stack: 1.1. Networking overview (Managing NFS and NIS)
protocol stack, application data in: 5.1. Traffic Capture Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
protocol support in devices: 6.2.2. Discovery and Filters (Essential SNMP)
protocols
from OSI: 16.3. Other Mail Transfer Protocols (Building Internet Firewalls)
analyzing: 13.2.4. What Else Can Come in If I Allow This Service? (Building Internet Firewalls)
Application Layer: 1.7. Application Layer (TCP/IP Network Administration)
application-level (see application-level protocols)
ARP: 1.3.2. IP host addresses (Managing NFS and NIS)
assigned port numbers: 13.4.4. Assigned Ports (Building Internet Firewalls)
bidirectionality of: 8.2.1. Protocols Are Usually Bidirectional (Building Internet Firewalls)
capturing traffic with snmpnetstat: 7.2.1.6. snmpnetstat (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
connectivity protocols (see connectivity protocols)
custom: 23.1.1.4. Using a custom protocol to connect to a perimeter web server (Building Internet Firewalls)
displaying traffic by: 8.3.1.2. Web mode (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
displaying with netstat: 2.1.3. netstat (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
evaluating: 13.2.1. What Operations Does the Protocol Allow? (Building Internet Firewalls)
file synchronization: 22.6. File Synchronization (Building Internet Firewalls)
filtering: 17.5. Protocol filtering (Managing NFS and NIS)
5.4.2.4.2. Protocol and port filtering. (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
implementation of, evaluating: 13.2.3. How Well Is the Protocol Implemented? (Building Internet Firewalls)
Internet Layer: 1.5. Internet Layer (TCP/IP Network Administration)
ICMP: 1.5.2. Internet Control Message Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
IP: 1.5.1. Internet Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
1.5.1.1. The datagram (TCP/IP Network Administration)
1.5.1.2. Routing datagrams (TCP/IP Network Administration)
1.5.1.3. Fragmenting datagrams (TCP/IP Network Administration)
1.5.1.4. Passing datagrams to the transport layer (TCP/IP Network Administration)
IP: 1.3. Network layer (Managing NFS and NIS)
IPSEC: 1.6.4. IPSEC (SSH, The Secure Shell)
below IP: 4.4. Protocols Below IP (Building Internet Firewalls)
mounts: 6.1. Setting up NFS (Managing NFS and NIS)
Network Access Layer: 1.4. Network Access Layer (TCP/IP Network Administration)
network-level (see names of specific protocols)
networking and: 1.1. Networking overview (Managing NFS and NIS)
NFS, statelessness, design and: 7.2.2. Statelessness and crash recovery (Managing NFS and NIS)
NIS, procedure calls: 3.3.9. The ypserv daemon (Managing NFS and NIS)
non-IP: 4.7. Non-IP Protocols (Building Internet Firewalls)
non-standards track: 1.1.2. Protocol Standards (TCP/IP Network Administration)
open standards development: 1.1.2. Protocol Standards (TCP/IP Network Administration)
packet capture and: 5.1. Traffic Capture Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
peers: 1.2. A Data Communications Model (TCP/IP Network Administration)
routing: 22.2. Routing Protocols (Building Internet Firewalls)
BGP: 7.5.2. Border Gateway Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
EGP: 7.5.1. Exterior Gateway Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
exterior: 7.5. Exterior Routing Protocols (TCP/IP Network Administration)
gated: 7.6. Gateway Routing Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
interior: 7.4. Interior Routing Protocols (TCP/IP Network Administration)
OSPF: 7.4.3. Open Shortest Path First (TCP/IP Network Administration)
RIP: 7.4.1. Routing Information Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
RIP-2: 7.4.2. RIP Version 2 (TCP/IP Network Administration)
routed command: 7.4.1.1. Running RIP with routed (TCP/IP Network Administration)
selecting: 7.5.3. Choosing a Routing Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
security of: C.4. What Makes a Protocol Secure? (Building Internet Firewalls)
proxying and: 13.4.5. Protocol Security (Building Internet Firewalls)
SSH: 1.3. The SSH Protocol (SSH, The Secure Shell)
version strings: 3.4.1. Establishing the Secure Connection (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH-1: 3.4. Inside SSH-1 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
authentication methods: 3.4.2. Client Authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
compared to SSH-2: 3.5.1. Protocol Differences (SSH-1 Versus SSH-2) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH-2, modules: 3.5.1. Protocol Differences (SSH-1 Versus SSH-2) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
stack: 1.2. A Data Communications Model (TCP/IP Network Administration)
headers: 1.3. TCP/IP Protocol Architecture (TCP/IP Network Administration)
standards: 1.1.1. TCP/IP Features (TCP/IP Network Administration)
1.1.2. Protocol Standards (TCP/IP Network Administration)
stateful: 1.4.1. TCP and UDP (Managing NFS and NIS)
time-dependence of: 22.5. Network Time Protocol (NTP) (Building Internet Firewalls)
tracing, gated: B.1. The gated Command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Transport Layer: 1.6. Transport Layer (TCP/IP Network Administration)
TCP: 1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
UDP: 1.6.1. User Datagram Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
transport-level (see names of specific protocols)
tree display in ethereal: 5.6.1.1. Using ethereal (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
troubleshooting
ftp failure: 13.8. Protocol Case Study (TCP/IP Network Administration)
overview: 13.7. Analyzing Protocol Problems (TCP/IP Network Administration)
snoop: 13.7.1. Packet Filters (TCP/IP Network Administration)
XDR: 1.5.2. External data representation (Managing NFS and NIS)
protocols file (/etc/protocols): 2.6.1. Protocol Numbers (TCP/IP Network Administration)
9.4. Network Information Service (TCP/IP Network Administration)
provide-ixfr server substatement: 10.4.4. BIND 9 IXFR Configuration (DNS and Bind)
proxies (see SOCKS)
proxy: 4.1.5.8. SOCKS proxy support (SSH, The Secure Shell)
proxy forwarder: F.1.2. SNMPv3 Applications (Essential SNMP)
proxy keys: 9.3.5.4. SSH and authentication spoofing (SSH, The Secure Shell)
Proxy Server: 9.7. Using Microsoft Proxy Server (Building Internet Firewalls)
proxy servers: 10.3. Sending Traps (Essential SNMP)
caching options: 11.3.9. Proxy Servers and Caching (TCP/IP Network Administration)
compared to NAT boxes: 4.2.1. Obtaining an IP Address (TCP/IP Network Administration)
non-connected networks: 4.1. Connected and Non-Connected Networks (TCP/IP Network Administration)
scalability: 4.2.1. Obtaining an IP Address (TCP/IP Network Administration)
security: 4.2.1. Obtaining an IP Address (TCP/IP Network Administration)
stack fingerprinting and: 6.3.1. Stack Fingerprinting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
proxy services: 5.1. Some Firewall Definitions (Building Internet Firewalls)
5.3. Proxy Services (Building Internet Firewalls)
9. Proxy Systems (Building Internet Firewalls)
without proxy server: 9.4. Proxying Without a Proxy Server (Building Internet Firewalls)
advantages/disadvantages: 5.3.1. Advantages of Proxying (Building Internet Firewalls)
application- versus circuit-level: 9.3.1. Application-Level Versus Circuit-Level Proxies (Building Internet Firewalls)
generic vs. dedicated: 9.3.2. Generic Versus Dedicated Proxies (Building Internet Firewalls)
intelligent servers: 9.3.3. Intelligent Proxy Servers (Building Internet Firewalls)
Microsoft Proxy Server: 9.7. Using Microsoft Proxy Server (Building Internet Firewalls)
multiple operating systems: 9.1. Why Proxying? (Building Internet Firewalls)
protocol security: 13.4.5. Protocol Security (Building Internet Firewalls)
SOCKS package for: 9.5. Using SOCKS for Proxying (Building Internet Firewalls)
software for: 9.2. How Proxying Works (Building Internet Firewalls)
TIS Internet Firewalls Toolkit for: 9.6. Using the TIS Internet Firewall Toolkit for Proxying (Building Internet Firewalls)
tools for: B.4. Proxy Systems Tools (Building Internet Firewalls)
when unable to provide: 9.8. What If You Can't Proxy? (Building Internet Firewalls)
proxyarp command (dip): A.1.1. The dip Script File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
proxyarp option (pppd): A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
ProxyCommand: 7.4.6.3. SOCKS in OpenSSH (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ProxyRequests option (proxy server caching): 11.3.9. Proxy Servers and Caching (TCP/IP Network Administration)
ProxyVia option (proxy server caching): 11.3.9. Proxy Servers and Caching (TCP/IP Network Administration)
PRUNE_TIMEOUT parameter, nfslogd daemon: 14.6.8. Other configuration parameters (Managing NFS and NIS)
ps command: 7.1.3. Using Signals (DNS and Bind)
2.1.1. ps (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
2.1.7. Scanning Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
7.2.1.8. Agents and traps (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Apache software, locating: 11.1. Installing Apache Software (TCP/IP Network Administration)
psend command (dip): A.1.1. The dip Script File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pseudo-device statement, BSD Unix kernel configuration: 5.1.5.2. The pseudo-device statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pseudo-random number generators (PRNG): 3.7. Randomness (SSH, The Secure Shell)
psn-interval parameter (gated): B.8.3. The isis Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
PTR records: 4.2.7. PTR Records (DNS and Bind)
C.3.1.6. Domain Name Pointer record (TCP/IP Network Administration)
A.1.2. Types (DNS and Bind)
Looked for PTR, Found CNAME message and: 14.5.4. Resolver Reports "Looked for PTR, Found CNAME" (DNS and Bind)
missing: 12.7.3. No PTR Record for Name Server's Address (DNS and Bind)
14.3.4. Added Name to Zone Data File but Forgot to Add PTR Record (DNS and Bind)
reverse zone records: 8.3.6. The Reverse Zone File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
named.local file: 8.3.5. The named.local File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
order of in zone data files: 4.2.1. The Zone Data Files (DNS and Bind)
query statistics for: 7.6.2.1. BIND 4.9 and 8 statistics (DNS and Bind)
pty option (pppd): A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pty (pseudo-terminal) allocation: 7.4.5.5. Pseudo-terminal allocation (TTY/PTY/PTTY) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
PubKeyAuthentication: 5.5.1.2. Public-key authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
public exponent, RSA key parameter: 2.4.3. Installing a Public Key on an SSH ServerMachine (SSH, The Secure Shell)
public-key authentication: 5.5.1.2. Public-key authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
disadvantages, under SSH1: 3.4.2.2. Public-key authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
per-account configuration: 8.2. Public Key-Based Configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH1: 3.4.2.2. Public-key authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
troubleshooting: 12.1.2. Server Debugging (SSH, The Secure Shell)
12.2.2.4. Public-key authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
checking file permissions: 12.2.2.4. Public-key authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
typos in key files: 12.2.2.4. Public-key authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
public-key certificates: 3.5.1.3. Key/identity binding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
public-key cryptography: 3.2.2. Public- and Secret-Key Cryptography (SSH, The Secure Shell)
public key encryption: 11.4.5. Using Encryption (TCP/IP Network Administration)
encryption algorithms: 3.9.1.1. Rivest-Shamir-Adleman (RSA) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
12.6. Encryption (TCP/IP Network Administration)
ssh: 12.2.6. Secure Shell (TCP/IP Network Administration)
stunnel: 12.6.2.1. stunnel (TCP/IP Network Administration)
tools: 12.6.2. Public-Key Encryption Tools (TCP/IP Network Administration)
public key exchange: 12.5.2.3. Public key exchange (Managing NFS and NIS)
public-key files
installing on remote host: 12.2.2.4. Public-key authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
naming in SSH2: 6.2.2. Generating RSA/DSA Keys for SSH2 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
Public-Key Infrastructure X.509 (PKIX): C.3.2. Certificates (Building Internet Firewalls)
public keys: 2.4.1. A Brief Introduction to Keys (SSH, The Secure Shell)
6.1. What Is an Identity? (SSH, The Secure Shell)
comment fields
changing: 6.2.1. Generating RSA Keys for SSH1 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
6.2.2. Generating RSA/DSA Keys for SSH2 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH1: 6.2.1. Generating RSA Keys for SSH1 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
deriving from private keys: 6.2.2. Generating RSA/DSA Keys for SSH2 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
hosts: 5.5.1.5. Fetching public keys of known hosts (SSH, The Secure Shell)
installing in remote account: 2.4.3. Installing a Public Key on an SSH ServerMachine (SSH, The Secure Shell)
12.1.2. Server Debugging (SSH, The Secure Shell)
line break problem: 12.2.2.4. Public-key authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
NFS security: 12.5.4.6. Public and private keys (Managing NFS and NIS)
RSA keylength (SSH1): 6.2.1. Generating RSA Keys for SSH1 (SSH, The Secure Shell)
syntax, authorization files (SSH1): 8.2.1. SSH1 Authorization Files (SSH, The Secure Shell)
verification of ownership: 3.5.1.3. Key/identity binding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
public option
share command: 9.1.2.1. The share command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
vfstab file: 9.1.3.2. The vfstab and fstab files (TCP/IP Network Administration)
public time servers: 11.3. NTP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
PublicHostKeyFile: 5.4.1.1. Host key files (SSH, The Secure Shell)
publickey map
database sources and: 3.2.2. Installing the NIS master server (Managing NFS and NIS)
published addresses in ARP tables: 2.1.6. arp (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
published mapping: 13.2.3. IP to MAC address mappings (Managing NFS and NIS)
pubring.gpg file: 12.6.2. Public-Key Encryption Tools (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pull technology: 15.6. Push Technologies (Building Internet Firewalls)
pulse code modulation (PCM): 3.4.4. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (TCP/IP Network Administration)
purchase information: 1.3.1. Documentation (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
purchasing software: 6.1.3. Selecting a Product (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
pursuing intruders: 27.3. Pursuing and Capturing the Intruder (Building Internet Firewalls)
push technologies: 15.6. Push Technologies (Building Internet Firewalls)
PuTTY: 13.3. Table of Products (SSH, The Secure Shell)
putty ssh tool: 11.5. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
pviewer.exe process tool: 2.3. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
pview.exe process tool: 2.3. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
PWDR: 4.2.4. Password file updates (Managing NFS and NIS)
PX records: A.1.4. New Types from RFC 1664 (DNS and Bind)


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