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Index: D

--decrypt option (gpg): 12.6.2. Public-Key Encryption Tools (TCP/IP Network Administration)
--disable-all-scp-stats: 4.1.5.11. scp behavior (SSH, The Secure Shell)
--disable-client-port-forwardings: 4.1.5.5. TCP port forwarding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
9.2.10.1. Compile-time configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
--disable-client-x11-forwarding: 4.1.5.4. X window support (SSH, The Secure Shell)
--disable-debug: 4.1.5.14. Debug output (SSH, The Secure Shell)
--disable-debug-heavy: 4.1.5.14. Debug output (SSH, The Secure Shell)
--disable-efence: 4.1.5.14. Debug output (SSH, The Secure Shell)
--disable-scp-stats: 4.1.5.11. scp behavior (SSH, The Secure Shell)
--disable-server-port-forwardings: 4.1.5.5. TCP port forwarding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
9.2.10.1. Compile-time configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
--disable-server-x11-forwarding: 4.1.5.4. X window support (SSH, The Secure Shell)
--disable-suid-ssh, recommended setting: 10.2. Compile-Time Configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
--disable-suid-ssh-signer, recommended setting: 10.2. Compile-Time Configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
--disable-tcp-nodelay: 4.1.5.3. TCP/IP support (SSH, The Secure Shell)
--disable-tcp-port-forwarding: 4.1.5.5. TCP port forwarding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
9.2.10.1. Compile-time configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
--disable-X11-forwarding: 4.1.5.4. X window support (SSH, The Secure Shell)
D command (sendmail): 10.5.2. The Define Macro Command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
D flag (Linux routing table): 2.4. The Routing Table (TCP/IP Network Administration)
d2 option (nslookup): 12.3. Option Settings (DNS and Bind)
12.6.1. Showing the Query and Response Messages (DNS and Bind)
DAEMON_OPTIONS macro (sendmail): E.3. m4 sendmail Macros (TCP/IP Network Administration)
daemons: 1.5.3. Internet and RPC server configuration (Managing NFS and NIS)
as agents: 1.3. Managers and Agents (Essential SNMP)
automountd: 9.2.2. Command-line options (Managing NFS and NIS)
biod: 6.1. Setting up NFS (Managing NFS and NIS)
18.5. NFS async thread tuning (Managing NFS and NIS)
bootparamd, debugging: 8.6.3. Debugging rarpd and bootparamd (Managing NFS and NIS)
keyserv: 12.5.4.8. Establishing a session key (Managing NFS and NIS)
lock: 7.5.1. Lock and status daemons (Managing NFS and NIS)
lockd: 6.1. Setting up NFS (Managing NFS and NIS)
mountd: 6.1. Setting up NFS (Managing NFS and NIS)
6.3.6. Resolving mount problems (Managing NFS and NIS)
7.2. NFS protocol and implementation (Managing NFS and NIS)
NFS and: 10.1.6. NFS (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
nfsd: 6.1. Setting up NFS (Managing NFS and NIS)
7.2. NFS protocol and implementation (Managing NFS and NIS)
7.3.1. nfsd and NFS server threads (Managing NFS and NIS)
nfslogd: 14.6.4. The nfslogd daemon (Managing NFS and NIS)
pcnfsd: 10.5. Printer services (Managing NFS and NIS)
portmap: 1.5.3. Internet and RPC server configuration (Managing NFS and NIS)
rarpd: 8.3.1. Reverse ARP requests (Managing NFS and NIS)
8.3.1. Reverse ARP requests (Managing NFS and NIS)
debugging: 8.6.3. Debugging rarpd and bootparamd (Managing NFS and NIS)
rpcbind: 13.3.1.2. RPC portmapper — rpcbind (Managing NFS and NIS)
statd: 6.1. Setting up NFS (Managing NFS and NIS)
status: 7.5.1. Lock and status daemons (Managing NFS and NIS)
tools for: B.5. Daemons (Building Internet Firewalls)
ypbind: 3.3.10. The ypbind daemon (Managing NFS and NIS)
yppasswdd: 4.2.4. Password file updates (Managing NFS and NIS)
ypserve: 3.3.9. The ypserv daemon (Managing NFS and NIS)
daily graphs of traffic: 8.4.1.1. mrtg configuration file (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
8.4.3. cricket (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
damaged packets: 3.3.2.2. Interpreting results (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
DAP (Directory Access Protocol): 2.2.5. Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) (Managing NFS and NIS)
DARPA: Brief History of the Internet (DNS and Bind) 1.1. A (Very)
DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency): 1.1. TCP/IP and the Internet (TCP/IP Network Administration)
data: 1.1.1. Your Data (Building Internet Firewalls)
DNS: 20.1.3. DNS Data (Building Internet Firewalls)
mismatched: 20.1.4.3. Mismatched data between the hostname and IP address DNS trees (Building Internet Firewalls)
protecting: C.2.3. Integrity Protection (Building Internet Firewalls)
from sniffers: 13.1.6. Packet Sniffing (Building Internet Firewalls)
theft of: 1.2.1.3. Information theft (Building Internet Firewalls)
1.2.2.4. Spies (industrial and otherwise) (Building Internet Firewalls)
transferring: 2.4. File Transfer, File Sharing, and Printing (Building Internet Firewalls)
4.1. What Does a Packet Look Like? (Building Internet Firewalls)
8. Packet Filtering (Building Internet Firewalls)
allowing/disallowing: 8.1.1. Basic Packet Filtering (Building Internet Firewalls)
evaluating protocols for: 13.2.2. What Data Does the Protocol Transfer? (Building Internet Firewalls)
via TCP: 4.3.1. TCP (Building Internet Firewalls)
data bindings in traps: 10.3. Sending Traps (Essential SNMP)
data cabling (see cabling)
data collection (see collecting data)
deleting files: 9.2.3.1. Designing collections (Essential SNMP)
designing collections: 9.2.3.1. Designing collections (Essential SNMP)
displaying data: 9.2.3.2. Creating a threshold (Essential SNMP)
hardware requirements: 3.1. Hardware Considerations (Essential SNMP)
open source tools: 9.2.5. Open Source Tools for Data Collection and Graphing (Essential SNMP)
9.2.5. Open Source Tools for Data Collection and Graphing (Essential SNMP)
(see also MRTG)
polling intervals: 9.2.3.1. Designing collections (Essential SNMP)
restricting: 9.2.3.1. Designing collections (Essential SNMP)
SNMPc: 9.2.4. Castle Rock's SNMPc (Essential SNMP)
testing events and thresholds: 9.2.3.2. Creating a threshold (Essential SNMP)
thresholds: 9.2.3.1. Designing collections (Essential SNMP)
9.2.3.2. Creating a threshold (Essential SNMP)
updating graphs: 9.2.3.2. Creating a threshold (Essential SNMP)
xnmgraph and: 9.2.1. Collecting and Displaying Data with OpenView (Essential SNMP)
9.2.3.2. Creating a threshold (Essential SNMP)
DATA command (SMTP): 3.4.1. Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
data compression: 7.4.11. Data Compression (SSH, The Secure Shell)
data corruption: 4.2.4. Traffic Measurements with netstat (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
data delivery: 2.1. Addressing, Routing, and Multiplexing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
data-dependent problems: 3.3.2.3. Options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
data-driven attacks: 13.1.2. Data-Driven Attacks (Building Internet Firewalls)
protecting against: 13.1.10. Protecting Services (Building Internet Firewalls)
Data Encryption Standard (see DES)
data field (resource records): 4.5. Host Name Checking (BIND 4.9.4 and Later Versions) (DNS and Bind)
C.3.1. Standard Resource Records (TCP/IP Network Administration)
data files: 2.4.3. Zone Data Files (DNS and Bind)
3.3.5. Map files (Managing NFS and NIS)
data integrity checking algorithms: 3.1.2. Integrity (SSH, The Secure Shell)
data link layer (7-layer model): 1.2. Physical and data link layers (Managing NFS and NIS)
Ethernet addresses: 1.2.2. Ethernet addresses (Managing NFS and NIS)
frames: 1.2.1. Frames and network interfaces (Managing NFS and NIS)
packets: 1.2.1. Frames and network interfaces (Managing NFS and NIS)
Data Link Layer (OSI Model): 1.2. A Data Communications Model (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Data Link Layer Protocol: 6.2.1. The Serial Protocols (TCP/IP Network Administration)
data presentation layer (7-layer model), external data representation and: 1.5.2. External data representation (Managing NFS and NIS)
data representation
external: 1.5.2. External data representation (Managing NFS and NIS)
XDR (eXternal Data Representation): 1.5.2. External data representation (Managing NFS and NIS)
data segment size, changing: 10.12.2.1. Changing the data segment size limit (DNS and Bind)
data source, map names and: 3.3.6. Map naming (Managing NFS and NIS)
data storage requirements: 3.1. Hardware Considerations (Essential SNMP)
data streams, capturing: 5.5.3. tcpflow (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
data, troubleshooting old: 14.7.7. Can't Get Rid of Old Data (DNS and Bind)
data value (DNS resource records): 8.3.2. Standard Resource Records (TCP/IP Network Administration)
database dump, how to read: 14.2.3. How to Read a Database Dump (DNS and Bind)
database files (see zone data files)
database of configuration files (NIS): 1. Networking Fundamentals (Managing NFS and NIS)
database protocols, connecting to web servers with: 23.1.1.3. Using the database's protocols to connect to a perimeter web server (Building Internet Firewalls)
database servers, locating: 23.1.1. Locating Database Servers (Building Internet Firewalls)
databases
address conversion (sendmail): 10.4.1.1. Building a sendmail.cf with m4 macros (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Apache, user authentication: 11.4.4.2. Improved user authentication (TCP/IP Network Administration)
gpg: 12.6.2. Public-Key Encryption Tools (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sendmail
address transformation: 10.6.2.1. Transforming with a database (TCP/IP Network Administration)
10.8.2. Using Key Files in sendmail (TCP/IP Network Administration)
local information section (configuration file): 10.7.1. Modifying Local Information (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Unix r commands: 12.2.5. Secure the r Commands (TCP/IP Network Administration)
databases (DBM), NIS maps and: 3.3.5. Map files (Managing NFS and NIS)
databits command (dip): A.1.1. The dip Script File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
datagrams: 1.3.1. Datagrams and packets (Managing NFS and NIS)
2.1. SNMP and UDP (Essential SNMP)
1.3. TCP/IP Protocol Architecture (TCP/IP Network Administration)
1.5.1.1. The datagram (TCP/IP Network Administration)
2.2. The IP Address (TCP/IP Network Administration)
directing to another network: 1.3. Network layer (Managing NFS and NIS)
forwarding: 1.5.1.4. Passing datagrams to the transport layer (TCP/IP Network Administration)
fragmenting: 1.5.1.3. Fragmenting datagrams (TCP/IP Network Administration)
headers: 2.6.2. Port Numbers (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Appendix g.1. IP Datagram Header (TCP/IP Network Administration)
protocol numbers: 2.6.1. Protocol Numbers (TCP/IP Network Administration)
IP and: 1.3.1. Datagrams and packets (Managing NFS and NIS)
martians: 4.2.1. Obtaining an IP Address (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Network Access Layer
IP addresses: 1.4. Network Access Layer (TCP/IP Network Administration)
overview: 1.5.1.1. The datagram (TCP/IP Network Administration)
routing: 1.5.1.2. Routing datagrams (TCP/IP Network Administration)
datagrams, tracking: 8.6. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
dataless clients: 8.7. Configuration options (Managing NFS and NIS)
mounting: 8.7.1. Dataless clients (Managing NFS and NIS)
network architecture: 8.7.1. Dataless clients (Managing NFS and NIS)
dataless nodes, management: 8.7.1. Dataless clients (Managing NFS and NIS)
datasize option (named): C.2.5. The options Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
datasize substatement: 10.12.2.1. Changing the data segment size limit (DNS and Bind)
E.2.11.3. limit datasize (DNS and Bind)
DataType field, NFS log record: 14.6. NFS server logging (Managing NFS and NIS)
datatypes
decimal values in: 2.4. Extensions to the SMI in Version 2 (Essential SNMP)
importing from other MIBs: 2.3.2. Defining OIDs (Essential SNMP)
managed objects and: 2.3. The Structure of Management Information (Essential SNMP)
supported types
Net-SNMP: 8.3. Setting a MIB Value (Essential SNMP)
10.3.4. Sending Traps with Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
OpenView: 10.3.1. Sending Traps with OpenView (Essential SNMP)
Perl: 10.3. Sending Traps (Essential SNMP)
SMIv2: 2.4. Extensions to the SMI in Version 2 (Essential SNMP)
SNMP_util: 10.3.2. Sending Traps with Perl (Essential SNMP)
SystemEDGE: 11.2.1. Extensibility for Unix and Windows NT (Essential SNMP)
Trap Generator: 10.3.3. Sending Traps with Network Computing Technologies Trap Generator (Essential SNMP)
in trap data bindings: 10.3. Sending Traps (Essential SNMP)
date bytes, ordering, data representation and: 1.5.2. External data representation (Managing NFS and NIS)
Date field, NFS log record: 14.6. NFS server logging (Managing NFS and NIS)
date stamps
on tools and documentation: 1.3.1. Documentation (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
on troubleshooting printouts: 11.1.1. Automating Documentation (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
dates
DateAndTime convention: 2.4. Extensions to the SMI in Version 2 (Essential SNMP)
system dates: 2.7. Host Management Revisited (Essential SNMP)
daytime service: 22.7. Mostly Harmless Protocols (Building Internet Firewalls)
db category: 7.5.3.1. BIND 8 categories (DNS and Bind)
db files (see zone data files)
db.ADDR files: 4.2. Setting Up Zone Data (DNS and Bind)
SOA record required in: 4.2.4. SOA Records (DNS and Bind)
db.cache file: 4.2.10. The Root Hints Data (DNS and Bind)
4.2.10. The Root Hints Data (DNS and Bind)
(see also root hints file)
temporary root name server and: 8.6.3. Really Long Outages ( Weeks) (DNS and Bind)
updating: 7.2.6. Keeping the Root Hints Current (DNS and Bind)
db.DOMAIN files: 4.2. Setting Up Zone Data (DNS and Bind)
SOA record required in: 4.2.4. SOA Records (DNS and Bind)
DBM database
ASCII files, convertion: 3.3.6. Map naming (Managing NFS and NIS)
NIS maps and: 3.3.5. Map files (Managing NFS and NIS)
dbm (sendmail K command value): E.4.5. The sendmail K Command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dbmmanage command: 11.4.4.2. Improved user authentication (TCP/IP Network Administration)
db.root file
creating for temporary root name server: 8.6.3. Really Long Outages ( Weeks) (DNS and Bind)
internal roots and: 11.3.4.4. The db.root file (DNS and Bind)
DCA (Defense Communications Agency): 1.1. TCP/IP and the Internet (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DCC (Direct Client Connections): 19.1. Internet Relay Chat (IRC) (Building Internet Firewalls)
DCE/DFS security flavor: 12.2. How secure are NIS and NFS? (Managing NFS and NIS)
DCOM (Distributed Component Object Model): 14.2. Distributed Component Object Model (DCOM) (Building Internet Firewalls)
dcomcnfg program: 14.2. Distributed Component Object Model (DCOM) (Building Internet Firewalls)
DDN (Defense Data Network): 1.1. TCP/IP and the Internet (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DDNS (dynamic DNS): 6.2.1. IP Address Management (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
deacknowledging events: 10.2.5. The Alarm Browser (Essential SNMP)
deallocate-on-exit option (named): C.2.5. The options Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Debian Linux systems: 2.2.4. Startup Files and Scripts (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.1.4. FreeBSD Ports (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
debug messages, logging (BIND 8/9): 7.5. Logging in BIND 8 and 9 (DNS and Bind)
Debug mode
features: 5.8.1.2. SSH1 Debug mode (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH1: 5.8.1.2. SSH1 Debug mode (SSH, The Secure Shell)
debug option (nslookup): 12.3. Option Settings (DNS and Bind)
12.6.1. Showing the Query and Response Messages (DNS and Bind)
debug option (pppd): A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
debug option (resolv.conf file): 8.2.1. The Resolver Configuration File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
debug severity: 7.5. Logging in BIND 8 and 9 (DNS and Bind)
debug substatement: E.5.7. options debug (4.9+) (DNS and Bind)
E.5.8. options no-check-names (8.2+) (DNS and Bind)
E.5.9. options attempts (8.2+) (DNS and Bind)
E.5.10. options timeout (8.2+) (DNS and Bind)
E.5.11. options rotate (8.2+) (DNS and Bind)
debugging (see also troubleshooting)
0.10. Acknowledgments (SSH, The Secure Shell)
7.4.15. Logging and Debugging (SSH, The Secure Shell)
10.8.1. Testing Rewrite Rules (TCP/IP Network Administration)
1.1. General Approaches to Troubleshooting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
ARP replies, duplicate: 15.1. Duplicate ARP replies (Managing NFS and NIS)
boot parameter confusion case study: 15.3. Boot parameter confusion (Managing NFS and NIS)
bootparamd daemon: 8.6.3. Debugging rarpd and bootparamd (Managing NFS and NIS)
command for turning off: 7.1.1. ndc and controls (BIND 8) (DNS and Bind)
compile-time configuration: 4.1.5.14. Debug output (SSH, The Secure Shell)
directory content caching: 15.4. Incorrect directory content caching (Managing NFS and NIS)
interpreting output: 13.3. Reading Debugging Output (DNS and Bind)
levels: 5.8.2.1. SSH2 Debug mode (general) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
levels of: 13.1. Debugging Levels (DNS and Bind)
mount points, incorrect: 15.5. Incorrect mount point permissions (Managing NFS and NIS)
named-xfer utility for: 14.2.1. How to Use named-xfer (DNS and Bind)
networks: 13. Network Diagnostic and Administrative Tools (Managing NFS and NIS)
15. Debugging Network Problems (Managing NFS and NIS)
NFS error messages, asynchronous: 15.6. Asynchronous NFS error messages (Managing NFS and NIS)
nslookup and: 12.3. Option Settings (DNS and Bind)
8.4. Using nslookup (TCP/IP Network Administration)
option for resolvers/name servers: 6.1.6. The options Directive (DNS and Bind)
port conflicts, avoiding: 12.1.2. Server Debugging (SSH, The Secure Shell)
rarpd daemon: 8.6.3. Debugging rarpd and bootparamd (Managing NFS and NIS)
renegade server case study: 15.2. Renegade NIS server (Managing NFS and NIS)
RPC problems: 13.3.3. Debugging RPC problems (Managing NFS and NIS)
rpcinfo utility and: 13.3.2. RPC registration (Managing NFS and NIS)
sendmail arguments: E.2. The sendmail Command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SSH client: 12.1.1. Client Debugging (SSH, The Secure Shell)
SSH server: 12.1.2. Server Debugging (SSH, The Secure Shell)
turning on: 13.2. Turning On Debugging (DNS and Bind)
turning on when analyzing overworked name servers: 8.1.2. Capacity Planning (DNS and Bind)
debugging operating system: 10.9.2. Fix All Known System Bugs (Building Internet Firewalls)
dec command (dip): A.1.1. The dip Script File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
decentralized name management: 5.1.1. DNS versus NIS (Managing NFS and NIS)
decentralized network administration: 2.2.2. Subnets (TCP/IP Network Administration)
decimal dotted notation (OIDs): 7.1. Overview of SNMP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
7.2.1.1. snmpget (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
8.4.1.1. mrtg configuration file (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
decimal serial numbers vs. integer serial numbers: 7.2.2. SOA Serial Numbers (DNS and Bind)
7.2.2. SOA Serial Numbers (DNS and Bind)
(see also serial numbers)
decimal values, in SSH configuration files: 5.4.3.1. Port number and network interface (SSH, The Secure Shell)
decoding
packets manually: 5.4.2.3. Controlling what's displayed (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
tcpdump files: 5.5.5. tcpshow (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
decompressing software tools: A.1.1. Generic Installs (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
decoy scanning: 6.2.2. nmap (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
decrypt: 3.2. A Cryptography Primer (SSH, The Secure Shell)
decrypted keys, keyserv daemon: 12.5.4.8. Establishing a session key (Managing NFS and NIS)
dedicated connections, pppd command, configuring: 6.3.1. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dedicated proxy servers: 9.3.2. Generic Versus Dedicated Proxies (Building Internet Firewalls)
deduplication engines: 5.5. Supporting Software (Essential SNMP)
Deep Crack: 21.2. Passwords (Building Internet Firewalls)
default-asyncmap option (pppd): A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
default category: 7.5. Logging in BIND 8 and 9 (DNS and Bind)
BIND 9: 7.5.3.2. BIND 9 categories (DNS and Bind)
default command (dip): A.1.1. The dip Script File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
default deny stance: 3.5.1. Default Deny Stance: That Which Is Not Expressly Permitted Is Prohibited (Building Internet Firewalls)
8.2.3. Default Permit Versus Default Deny (Building Internet Firewalls)
default domain names: 3.3.3. Domain Names (TCP/IP Network Administration)
default domain, not set: 14.3.12. Local Domain Name Not Set (DNS and Bind)
default gateway: 2.4. The Routing Table (TCP/IP Network Administration)
address: 4. Getting Started (TCP/IP Network Administration)
addresses, need for: 4. Getting Started (TCP/IP Network Administration)
default keyword (route command): 7.3. Building a Static Routing Table (TCP/IP Network Administration)
default-lease-time parameter (dhcp.conf file): 9.5.1. dhcpd.conf (TCP/IP Network Administration)
default-lease-time parameter (dhcpd): D.3.2. Configuration Parameters (TCP/IP Network Administration)
default masks, indentifying: 2.2.3. The Natural Mask (TCP/IP Network Administration)
default-mru option (pppd): A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
default permit stance: 3.5.2. Default Permit Stance: That Which Is Not Expressly Prohibited Is Permitted (Building Internet Firewalls)
8.2.3. Default Permit Versus Default Deny (Building Internet Firewalls)
default route (network addresses): 2.2. The IP Address (TCP/IP Network Administration)
default routes in routing tables: 2.1.3. netstat (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
defaultdomain file: 9.4. Network Information Service (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DefaultIcon directive (Apache): 11.3.5. Creating a Fancy Index (TCP/IP Network Administration)
defaultmetric parameter (gated): B.8.2. The rip Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
defaultroute option (pppd): 6.3.1. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
defaultrouter file: 8.5.2. Recommendations (DNS and Bind)
defaults
domain name
option for: 12.3. Option Settings (DNS and Bind)
setting for host: 4.7.3.1. Set the local domain name (DNS and Bind)
origin for zone data files, changing: 7.3.2. Changing the Origin in a Zone Data File (DNS and Bind)
search list: 6.1.2. The Search List (DNS and Bind)
severity: 7.5. Logging in BIND 8 and 9 (DNS and Bind)
TTL: 8.4. Changing TTLs (DNS and Bind)
8.4.1. Changing Other SOA Values (DNS and Bind)
defaults parameter (gated): B.8.1. The ospf Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
default_stderr channel: 7.5.2.3. Stderr channel (DNS and Bind)
DefaultType directive (httpd.conf file): 11.3.6. Defining File Types (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA): 1.1. TCP/IP and the Internet (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Defense Communications Agency (DCA): 1.1. TCP/IP and the Internet (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Defense Data Network (DDN): 1.1. TCP/IP and the Internet (TCP/IP Network Administration)
defense in depth: 3.2. Defense in Depth (Building Internet Firewalls)
24.1.4.2. Defense in depth (Building Internet Firewalls)
24.2.4.2. Defense in depth (Building Internet Firewalls)
define class command (sendmail): 10.5.3. Defining Classes (TCP/IP Network Administration)
define macro command (sendmail): 10.5.2. The Define Macro Command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
E.3. m4 sendmail Macros (TCP/IP Network Administration)
E.3.1. define (TCP/IP Network Administration)
defining problems in troubleshooting: 12.1. Generic Troubleshooting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
definition fields (sendmail mailers): 10.5.8. Defining Mailers (TCP/IP Network Administration)
deflate option (pppd): A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
defname option (nslookup): 12.3. Option Settings (DNS and Bind)
defunct processes: 2.1.1. ps (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
DEL command (POP): 3.4.2. Post Office Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
delay between packets (see intervals between packets)
delegated name servers: 11.2.5.1. "Delegated" name server configuration (DNS and Bind)
delegation
checking: 9.6. Good Parenting (DNS and Bind)
14.3.10. Incorrect Subdomain Delegation (DNS and Bind)
managing with stubs: 9.6.2.1. Stubs: another way to manage delegation (DNS and Bind)
old information: 14.7.7.1. Old delegation information (DNS and Bind)
14.7.7.1. Old delegation information (DNS and Bind)
securing for in-addr.arpa zone: 3.2.5. Registering Your Zones (DNS and Bind)
subdomains and: 3.2.3.1. The us domain (DNS and Bind)
14.3.9. Missing Subdomain Delegation (DNS and Bind)
14.3.10. Incorrect Subdomain Delegation (DNS and Bind)
delegations
bad: 7.6.1. Common Syslog Messages (DNS and Bind)
lame (see lame delegation)
DELETE command (IMAP): 3.4.3. Internet Message Access Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
delete keyword
dbmmanage command: 11.4.4.2. Improved user authentication (TCP/IP Network Administration)
route command: 7.3. Building a Static Routing Table (TCP/IP Network Administration)
deleting
administrative files: 3.2.4. Enabling NIS on client hosts (Managing NFS and NIS)
aliases: 9.7.1. Removing Parent Aliases (DNS and Bind)
CNAME records: 9.7.1. Removing Parent Aliases (DNS and Bind)
core dumps: 12.3. Throw Core (Essential SNMP)
data from captured packets: 5.5.2. tcpdpriv (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
email attachments: 10.1.1. Email (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
email, POP servers: 3.4.2. Post Office Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
events: 10.2.5. The Alarm Browser (Essential SNMP)
hosts: 7.2.1. Adding and Deleting Hosts (DNS and Bind)
lockfiles: 12.5. Disk-Space Checker (Essential SNMP)
nodes from maps: 6.1.5.3. FilterExpressions (Essential SNMP)
old data-collection files: 9.2.3.1. Designing collections (Essential SNMP)
packages: A.1.2. Solaris Packages (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Delivery Status Notification (see DSN)
delta values
computing: 2.3.2. Defining OIDs (Essential SNMP)
in thresholds: 9.1.1.1. RMON configuration (Essential SNMP)
demand option (pppd): A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Demilitarized Zone (DMZ): 5.1. Some Firewall Definitions (Building Internet Firewalls)
denial of service attacks: 1.2.1.2. Denial of service (Building Internet Firewalls)
2.3.1. Electronic Mail (Building Internet Firewalls)
13.1.9. Denial of Service (Building Internet Firewalls)
HTTP and: 15.1. HTTP Server Security (Building Internet Firewalls)
ICMP and: 22.4. ICMP and Network Diagnostics (Building Internet Firewalls)
JavaScript and: 15.4.1. JavaScript (Building Internet Firewalls)
protecting against: 13.1.10. Protecting Services (Building Internet Firewalls)
denial of service (DoS): 12.1.1. Assessing the Threat (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Deny from directive (Directory containers): 11.4.4. Defining Access Controls (TCP/IP Network Administration)
deny keyword parameter (dhcpd): D.3.2. Configuration Parameters (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DenyForwardingPort: 9.2.10.2. Serverwide configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
DenyForwardingTo: 9.2.10.2. Serverwide configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
DenyGroups: 5.5.2.2. Group access control (SSH, The Secure Shell)
DenyHosts: 5.5.2.3. Hostname access control (SSH, The Secure Shell)
5.5.2.4. shosts access control (SSH, The Secure Shell)
DenySHosts: 5.5.2.4. shosts access control (SSH, The Secure Shell)
DenyTcpForwardingForGroups: 5.4.3.11. Forwarding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
DenyTcpForwardingForUsers: 5.4.3.11. Forwarding (SSH, The Secure Shell)
DenyUsers: 5.5.2.1. Account access control (SSH, The Secure Shell)
8.2.5. Restricting Access by Host or Domain (SSH, The Secure Shell)
dependencies, map files: 4.2.3. Map file dependencies (Managing NFS and NIS)
dependency in users: 1.3.2.2. Ego management (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
DependOnGroup registry key: 12.4.1.1. Registry keys (Building Internet Firewalls)
DependOnService registry key: 12.4.1.1. Registry keys (Building Internet Firewalls)
depmod command (Linux): 5.1.1. Using Dynamically Loadable Modules (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dequote (sendmail K command value): E.4.5. The sendmail K Command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
3DES: 3.9.2.3. Triple-DES (SSH, The Secure Shell)
DES algorithm: F.1.1. The SNMPv3 Engine (Essential SNMP)
F.2.1. Configuring SNMPv3 for a Cisco Router (Essential SNMP)
F.2.2. Configuring SNMPv3 for Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
DES (Data Encryption Standard): 12.5.2.1. Symmetric key encryption (Managing NFS and NIS)
0.10. Acknowledgments (SSH, The Secure Shell)
3.9.2.2. Data Encryption Standard (DES) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
DES (Data Encryption Standard) algorithm: C.5.1. Encryption Algorithms (Building Internet Firewalls)
descr field (RIPE database): 4.2.1.2. Obtaining an IN-ADDR.ARPA domain (TCP/IP Network Administration)
designated routers (OSPF): 7.4.3. Open Shortest Path First (TCP/IP Network Administration)
designing performance measurement test: 12.2.2.1. General steps (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
designing rewalls: 1.6.1. Buying Versus Building (Building Internet Firewalls)
DeskTalk Systems, Inc.: 5.4. Trend Analysis (Essential SNMP)
Destination Address
datagram headers: 1.5.1.1. The datagram (TCP/IP Network Administration)
TCP headers: 2.2. The IP Address (TCP/IP Network Administration)
destination addresses
filtering: 5.4.2.4.1. Address filtering. (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
MGEN settings: 9.1.2.2. MGEN (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
nemesis settings: 9.1.1.2. nemesis (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
in routing tables: 2.1.3. netstat (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
2.1.3. netstat (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Destination field
Linux routing table: 2.4. The Routing Table (TCP/IP Network Administration)
routing tables: 7.2. The Minimal Routing Table (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Destination field (Linux routing table): 2.4. The Routing Table (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Destination Port: 1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Destination Port numbers (UDP): 1.6.1. User Datagram Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
destination unreachable codes (see ICMP)
Destination Unreachable Message (ICMP): 1.5.2. Internet Control Message Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
destination values (routing tables): 2.4. The Routing Table (TCP/IP Network Administration)
detached processes, running tcpdump as: 5.4.1. Using tcpdump (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
detail
DSN error code: 10.6.2. Transforming the Address (TCP/IP Network Administration)
gated trace statements: B.4. Trace Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
detailed output (see verbose output)
detecting
intruders: 8.3.1.2. Web mode (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
packet sniffers: 5.7.2. Protecting Yourself (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
/dev/random: 3.7. Randomness (SSH, The Secure Shell)
/dev/urandom: 3.7. Randomness (SSH, The Secure Shell)
dev/cua3 argument (pppd command): 6.3.1. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
developing solutions in troubleshooting: 12.1. Generic Troubleshooting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
device discovery
automatic discovery problems: 6.5. Mapping or Diagramming (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
IP address management and: 6.2.1. IP Address Management (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
in network management software: 6.1.1. Characteristics of Management Software (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
network mapping: 6.5. Mapping or Diagramming (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
politics and security: 6.6. Politics and Security (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
tools: 6.2. Device Discovery (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
arpwatch tool: 6.2.3. arpwatch (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
nmap tool: 6.2.2. nmap (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
scripting tools: 6.4. Scripts (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
tkined tool: 6.5.1.2. Autodiscovery with tkined (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
types of: 6.1.2. Discovery and Mapping Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
device drivers
Ethernet, loading: 5.1.1. Using Dynamically Loadable Modules (TCP/IP Network Administration)
installing, pkgadd command: 5.1.1. Using Dynamically Loadable Modules (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DEVICE (Linux configuration value): 6.1.3. Assigning an Address (TCP/IP Network Administration)
device monitoring
Microsoft Windows: 7.4. Microsoft Windows (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
NET SNMP tool: 7.2. SNMP-Based Management Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
with non-SNMP applications: 7.3. Non-SNMP Approaches (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
ports: 5.2. Access to Traffic (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
scotty tool: 7.2.2. scotty (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
switches in path devices: 5.2. Access to Traffic (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
tkined tool: 7.2.3. tkined (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
with SNMP (see SNMP)
device type identification: 6.3.1. Stack Fingerprinting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
devices
adding to maps: 6.5.1.1. Drawing maps with tkined (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
agent software in: 5.1. SNMP Agents (Essential SNMP)
as bottlenecks: 12.2.2.2. Bottleneck analysis (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
configuring with SNMP: 7.2.1.4. snmpset (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
counting MIB objects in: 8.2.1. Walking the MIB Tree with OpenView (Essential SNMP)
discovering (see device discovery)
discovering with SNMPc: 6.2.2. Discovery and Filters (Essential SNMP)
element managers: 5.3. Element Managers (Vendor-Specific Management) (Essential SNMP)
emulators: 9.2. Network Emulators and Simulators (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
fully-qualified domain names: 7.1. Parameter Settings (Essential SNMP)
identifying types of: 6.3. Device Identification (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
locations: 7.1. Parameter Settings (Essential SNMP)
manageable types: 4.4. In the End (Essential SNMP)
MIBs for: 7.2.1.2. Configuration and options (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
monitoring (see device monitoring, SNMP)
MRTG and: 13.1. Using MRTG (Essential SNMP)
13.1. Using MRTG (Essential SNMP)
mrtg information: 8.4.1.1. mrtg configuration file (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
NMS suite applications: 5.2. NMS Suites (Essential SNMP)
non-SNMP devices: 13.4. Other Data-Gathering Applications (Essential SNMP)
parameter settings: 7.1. Parameter Settings (Essential SNMP)
polling
external: 9.2. External Polling (Essential SNMP)
internal: 9.1. Internal Polling (Essential SNMP)
by type: 9.2.2. OpenView Graphing (Essential SNMP)
polling with tkined: 7.2.3.5. Other commands (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
security: 2.2. SNMP Communities (Essential SNMP)
7.2. Security Concerns (Essential SNMP)
7.2. Security Concerns (Essential SNMP)
sending traps: 10.3. Sending Traps (Essential SNMP)
forcing hardware to send traps: 10.3.5. Forcing Your Hardware to Generate Traps (Essential SNMP)
hooks in programs: 10.3.6. Using Hooks with Your Programs (Essential SNMP)
Net-SNMP: 10.3.4. Sending Traps with Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
OpenView: 10.3.1. Sending Traps with OpenView (Essential SNMP)
Perl scripts: 10.3.2. Sending Traps with Perl (Essential SNMP)
Trap Generator: 10.3.3. Sending Traps with Network Computing Technologies Trap Generator (Essential SNMP)
single-homed: 8.2. Retrieving Multiple MIB Values (Essential SNMP)
SNMP compatibility: 4.1. What Does SNMP-Compatible Really Mean? (Essential SNMP)
SNMP management: 1.1. Network Management and Monitoring (Essential SNMP)
staffing resources for maintenance: 1.1.2. Human Considerations (Essential SNMP)
supporting software: 5.5. Supporting Software (Essential SNMP)
trend-analysis software: 5.4. Trend Analysis (Essential SNMP)
troubleshooting installation: 12.2.1. Installation Testing (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
unreachable: 7.2.3.1. ICMP monitoring (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
upgrading: 4.3. Upgrading Your Hardware (Essential SNMP)
vendor-specific applications: 5.3. Element Managers (Vendor-Specific Management) (Essential SNMP)
versions of SNMP in: 4.2. Is My Device SNMP-Compatible? (Essential SNMP)
devices, mounting and: 6.3.6. Resolving mount problems (Managing NFS and NIS)
devices statement (BSD Unix kernel configuration): 5.1.5.3. The device statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Dfs (Distributed File System): 17.4.2. Distributed File System (Dfs) (Building Internet Firewalls)
dgram field (inet.conf file): 5.3. The Internet Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dh value (share command): 9.1.2.1. The share command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol): 22.3.2. Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) (Building Internet Firewalls)
3.6.2. Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
arpwatch tool and: 6.2.3. arpwatch (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
dhcpd file: 9.5.1. dhcpd.conf (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dynamic updates and: 10.2. DNS Dynamic Update (DNS and Bind)
filters: 6.1.5. Using OpenView Filters (Essential SNMP)
identifying address ranges: 6.5. Mapping or Diagramming (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
ifconfig and: 13.2.1.2. Initializing an interface (Managing NFS and NIS)
IP address management and: 6.2.1. IP Address Management (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
operational principles: 3.6.2.1. How DHCP works (TCP/IP Network Administration)
overview: 9.5. DHCP (TCP/IP Network Administration)
polling options: 6.1.2. The netmon Process (Essential SNMP)
rogue servers: 2.1.6. arp (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
system configuration information, distributing to end-users: 4.6. Informing the Users (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dhcpd
command-line options: D.2. The dhcpd Command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
common options: D.3.3.1. Commonly used options (TCP/IP Network Administration)
compiling: D.1. Compiling dhcpd (TCP/IP Network Administration)
mailing list: D.1. Compiling dhcpd (TCP/IP Network Administration)
option statement: D.3.3. DHCP Options (TCP/IP Network Administration)
other options: D.3.3.2. Other options (TCP/IP Network Administration)
parameter statements: D.3.2. Configuration Parameters (TCP/IP Network Administration)
syntax: D.2. The dhcpd Command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dhcpd.conf file: 9.5.1. dhcpd.conf (TCP/IP Network Administration)
D.3. The dhcpd.conf Configuration File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
parameters: 9.5.1. dhcpd.conf (TCP/IP Network Administration)
range parameter: 9.5.1. dhcpd.conf (TCP/IP Network Administration)
topology statements: D.3.1. Topology Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DHCPDISCOVER packet: 3.6.2.1. How DHCP works (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DHCPOFFER packet: 3.6.2.1. How DHCP works (TCP/IP Network Administration)
diagnostic tools: 3.2. Testing Adapters (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
B.1. Sources of Information (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
nfsbug utility: 14.4.4. nfsbug (Managing NFS and NIS)
time synchronization: 14.7. Time synchronization (Managing NFS and NIS)
diagnostic tools, NFS: 14. NFS Diagnostic Tools (Managing NFS and NIS)
administration: 14.1. NFS administration tools (Managing NFS and NIS)
NFS Server Logging utility: 14.6. NFS server logging (Managing NFS and NIS)
NFS version 2: 14.5. Version 2 and Version 3 differences (Managing NFS and NIS)
NFSWATCH: 14.4.3. NFSWATCH (Managing NFS and NIS)
publicly available: 14.4. Publicly available diagnostics (Managing NFS and NIS)
SATAN: 14.4.5. SATAN (Managing NFS and NIS)
statistics: 14.2. NFS statistics (Managing NFS and NIS)
diagramming networks (see mapping networks)
diagramming the system: 27.5.2. Labeling and Diagramming Your System (Building Internet Firewalls)
dial command (dip): 6.3.2. Dial-Up PPP (TCP/IP Network Administration)
A.1.1. The dip Script File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dial-in access, traceroute and: 4.1.2. Complications with traceroute (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
dial-on-demand connections: 16.4.7. Running Authoritative Name Servers over Dial-on-Demand (DNS and Bind)
dial-up connections: 6.3.1. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dip
sample script file: A.1.1.1. A sample dip script (TCP/IP Network Administration)
script file: A.1.1. The dip Script File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
syntax: A.1. Dial-Up IP (TCP/IP Network Administration)
PPP, configuring: 6.3.2. Dial-Up PPP (TCP/IP Network Administration)
pppd, syntax: A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
scripts, troubleshooting: 6.3.7. Troubleshooting Serial Connections (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dial-up IP (see dip)
Dial-Up Networking (see DUN)
dialup connections: 16.4. Dialup Connections (DNS and Bind)
mamual: 16.4.3. Manual Dialup with One Host (DNS and Bind)
dialup option (named): C.2.5. The options Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dialup substatement: 16.4.7. Running Authoritative Name Servers over Dial-on-Demand (DNS and Bind)
dictionary attack: 2.4.3. Installing a Public Key on an SSH ServerMachine (SSH, The Secure Shell)
dictionary attacks: 21.3.1. One-Time Password Software (Building Internet Firewalls)
differential growth in networks: 12.2.2.3. Capacity planning (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Diffie-Hellman authentication: 12.5.4. AUTH_DH: Diffie-Hellman authentication (Managing NFS and NIS)
diffie-hellman-group1-sha1: 3.5.1.2. Session key exchange and the server key (SSH, The Secure Shell)
Diffie-Hellman key-agreement algorithm: 3.5.1.2. Session key exchange and the server key (SSH, The Secure Shell)
3.9.1.3. Diffie-Hellman key agreement (SSH, The Secure Shell)
Diffie-Helman algorithm: C.5.4. Key Exchange (Building Internet Firewalls)
dig (debugging tool): 13.6.4. dig: An Alternative to nslookup (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dig domain name tool: 10.1.4.1. nslookup and dig (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
dig utility: 7.2.6. Keeping the Root Hints Current (DNS and Bind)
vs. nslookup: 12.9. Using dig (DNS and Bind)
options for: 12.9.3. dig Options (DNS and Bind)
using: 12.9. Using dig (DNS and Bind)
zone transfers, performing with: 12.9.2. Zone Transfers with dig (DNS and Bind)
digest (MIME data subtype): 3.4.4. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (TCP/IP Network Administration)
digital certificates: Protocol (SSH, The Secure Shell) 1.6.6. Secure Socket Layer (SSL)
digital signature: C.3.1. Digital Signatures (Building Internet Firewalls)
in ActiveX: 15.4.4. ActiveX (Building Internet Firewalls)
in OpenPGP: 16.1.4. S/MIME and OpenPGP (Building Internet Firewalls)
in S/MIME: 16.1.4. S/MIME and OpenPGP (Building Internet Firewalls)
algorithms: C.5.2. Digital Signature Algorithms (Building Internet Firewalls)
Digital Signature Algorithm (see DSA)
Digital Signature Standard (DSS): 3.9.1.2. Digital Signature Algorithm (DSA) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
digital signatures: 3.2.2. Public- and Secret-Key Cryptography (SSH, The Secure Shell)
Digital Unix, configuring resolvers for: 6.4.5. Compaq's Tru64 Unix and Digital Unix (DNS and Bind)
Digital Unix operating system: 5.2. NMS Suites (Essential SNMP)
Dijkstra Shortest Path First (SPF) algorithm: 7.4.3. Open Shortest Path First (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dip command: 6.3.2. Dial-Up PPP (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dip (dial-up IP)
configuring: 6.3.2. Dial-Up PPP (TCP/IP Network Administration)
options: A.1. Dial-Up IP (TCP/IP Network Administration)
sample script file: A.1.1.1. A sample dip script (TCP/IP Network Administration)
script file: A.1.1. The dip Script File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
syntax: A.1. Dial-Up IP (TCP/IP Network Administration)
.dir files: 3.3.5. Map files (Managing NFS and NIS)
makedbm utility[dir files
makedbm utility: 3.3.6. Map naming (Managing NFS and NIS)
Direct Client Connections (DCC): 19.1. Internet Relay Chat (IRC) (Building Internet Firewalls)
direct delivery (SMTP): 3.4.1. Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
direct map configuration file (automounter): 9.1.4. NFS Automounter (TCP/IP Network Administration)
direct maps, automounter: 9.1. Automounter maps (Managing NFS and NIS)
9.1.3. Direct maps (Managing NFS and NIS)
conversion: 9.5.3. Conversion of direct maps (Managing NFS and NIS)
updating: 9.3.2. Updating NIS-managed automount maps (Managing NFS and NIS)
direct measurements vs. emulation or simulation: 9.2. Network Emulators and Simulators (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
directed graphs (OSPF): 7.4.3. Open Shortest Path First (TCP/IP Network Administration)
directives: 6.1. The Resolver (DNS and Bind)
Apache
configuration: 11.3.1. Loading Dynamic Shared Objects (TCP/IP Network Administration)
directory-level configuration control: 11.4.3. Directory-Level Configuration Controls (TCP/IP Network Administration)
httpd process control: 11.3.3. Managing the Swarm (TCP/IP Network Administration)
log files: 11.3.8.1. Defining the log file format (TCP/IP Network Administration)
MIME file types: 11.3.6. Defining File Types (TCP/IP Network Administration)
performance tuning: 11.3.7. Performance Tuning Directives (TCP/IP Network Administration)
user authentication: 11.4.4.1. Requiring user authentication (TCP/IP Network Administration)
web server document locations: 11.3.4. Defining Where Things Are Stored (TCP/IP Network Administration)
BIND: 8.3.3. Zone File Directives (TCP/IP Network Administration)
httpd.conf file, configuration: 11.3.2. Basic Configuration Directives (TCP/IP Network Administration)
list of: E.1. BIND Name Server Boot File Directives and Configuration File Statements (DNS and Bind)
zone files, creating: C.3. Zone File Records (TCP/IP Network Administration)
directives in mrtg configuration files: 8.4.1.1. mrtg configuration file (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
directories
Apache, configuration control: 11.4.3. Directory-Level Configuration Controls (TCP/IP Network Administration)
content caching, incorrect (debugging case study): 15.4. Incorrect directory content caching (Managing NFS and NIS)
creating: 7.2.1. NFS RPC procedures (Managing NFS and NIS)
destroying: 7.2.1. NFS RPC procedures (Managing NFS and NIS)
entries
hard links: 6.4. Symbolic links (Managing NFS and NIS)
symbolic links: 6.4. Symbolic links (Managing NFS and NIS)
indexing, Apache: 11.3.5. Creating a Fancy Index (TCP/IP Network Administration)
mount point: 14.1. NFS administration tools (Managing NFS and NIS)
in OpenView: 6.1. HP's OpenView Network Node Manager (Essential SNMP)
organizing zone data files in: 7.3.1. Using Several Directories (DNS and Bind)
Directory containers (Apache): 11.3.4. Defining Where Things Are Stored (TCP/IP Network Administration)
server options, controlling: 11.4.2. Controlling Server Options (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Directory directive (httpd.conf file): 11.3.4. Defining Where Things Are Stored (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Directory field (sendmail): 10.5.8. Defining Mailers (TCP/IP Network Administration)
directory name lookup cache (DNLC): 7.4.3. Server-side caching (Managing NFS and NIS)
directory operations
mkdir: 7.2.1. NFS RPC procedures (Managing NFS and NIS)
rmdir: 7.2.1. NFS RPC procedures (Managing NFS and NIS)
directory option (named): C.2.5. The options Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Directory Replication (Windows NT): 22.6.3. Windows NT Directory Replication (Building Internet Firewalls)
directory services
commonly used: 2.2. Brief survey of common directory services (Managing NFS and NIS)
DNS: 2.2.1. Directory Name Service (DNS) (Managing NFS and NIS)
hosts database and: 2.1.1. The hosts database (Managing NFS and NIS)
LDAP: 2.2.5. Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) (Managing NFS and NIS)
security and: 12.2. How secure are NIS and NFS? (Managing NFS and NIS)
multiple: 2.3. Name service switch (Managing NFS and NIS)
NIS: 2.2.2. Network Information Service (NIS) (Managing NFS and NIS)
NT Domain: 2.2.6. NT Domain (Managing NFS and NIS)
purpose: 2.1. Purpose of directory services (Managing NFS and NIS)
selecting: 2.4. Which directory service to use (Managing NFS and NIS)
X.500: 2.2.4. X.500 (Managing NFS and NIS)
directory sharing
mounting remote directories: 9.1.3. Mounting Remote Filesystems (TCP/IP Network Administration)
NFS
daemons: 9.1.1. NFS Daemons (TCP/IP Network Administration)
overview: 9.1. The Network File System (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Samba: 9.3.1.2. Sharing directories through Samba (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Unix: 9.1.2. Sharing Unix Filesystems (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DirectoryIndex option (Apache): 11.3.4. Defining Where Things Are Stored (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dirty page clustering: 7.3.2. Client I/O system (Managing NFS and NIS)
--disable flags: 4.1.5.1. Configuration standards (SSH, The Secure Shell)
disabled UDP checksums: 14.5.5. Name Server Startup Fails Because UDP Checksums Disabled (DNS and Bind)
disabling
Berkeley packet filter: 5.7.2. Protecting Yourself (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
routing (see routers, disabling)
services: 10.10. Disabling Nonrequired Services (Building Internet Firewalls)
on Unix: 11.3.2. Disabling Services Under Unix (Building Internet Firewalls)
11.3.4. Specific Unix Services to Disable (Building Internet Firewalls)
on Windows NT: 12.4.2. How to Disable Services Under Windows NT (Building Internet Firewalls)
12.4.5. Specific Windows NT Services to Disable (Building Internet Firewalls)
discard service: 22.7. Mostly Harmless Protocols (Building Internet Firewalls)
discarding
alarms: 9.1.1.1. RMON configuration (Essential SNMP)
events: 9.1.1.1. RMON configuration (Essential SNMP)
disconnect option (pppd): A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
disconnecting
from network: 27.1.3. Disconnect or Shut Down, as Appropriate (Building Internet Firewalls)
plan for: 27.4.3. Planning for Disconnecting or Shutting Down Machines (Building Internet Firewalls)
machine: 27.4.3. Planning for Disconnecting or Shutting Down Machines (Building Internet Firewalls)
after incident: 27.1.3. Disconnect or Shut Down, as Appropriate (Building Internet Firewalls)
discovering devices (see device discovery)
discovering paths: 4.1. Path Discovery with traceroute (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
discovery intervals, fixed: 6.1.2. The netmon Process (Essential SNMP)
discovery process
OpenView (netmon): 6.1.1. Running NNM (Essential SNMP)
6.1.2. The netmon Process (Essential SNMP)
filters: 6.1.5. Using OpenView Filters (Essential SNMP)
polling intervals: 6.1.3. Configuring Polling Intervals (Essential SNMP)
seed files: 6.1.2. The netmon Process (Essential SNMP)
SNMPc: 6.2.2. Discovery and Filters (Essential SNMP)
seed devices: 6.2. Castle Rock's SNMPc Enterprise Edition (Essential SNMP)
6.2.2. Discovery and Filters (Essential SNMP)
disk space (see memory resources)
checking with Net-SNMP: 11.1. Net-SNMP (Essential SNMP)
checking with OpenView: 12.5. Disk-Space Checker (Essential SNMP)
graphing usage: 13. MRTG (Essential SNMP)
host resources information: 2.7. Host Management Revisited (Essential SNMP)
NMS requirements: 3.1. Hardware Considerations (Essential SNMP)
disk status, checking with Veritas Volume Manager: 12.4. Veritas Disk Check (Essential SNMP)
disk usage information, retrieving: 7.2.1.8. Agents and traps (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
diskless clients
adding (Host Manager): 8.2. Setting up a diskless client (Managing NFS and NIS)
AdminSuite software and: 8.2. Setting up a diskless client (Managing NFS and NIS)
boot blocks: 8.3.2. Getting a boot block (Managing NFS and NIS)
boot parameters: 8.3.4. Managing boot parameters (Managing NFS and NIS)
checking: 8.6.2. Checking boot parameters (Managing NFS and NIS)
boot process: 8.3. Diskless client boot process (Managing NFS and NIS)
booting through routers: 17.4.2. Effects on diskless nodes (Managing NFS and NIS)
client swap space: 8.4. Managing client swap space (Managing NFS and NIS)
client/server ratios: 8.9. Client/server ratios (Managing NFS and NIS)
configuration: 8. Diskless Clients (Managing NFS and NIS)
8.7. Configuration options (Managing NFS and NIS)
filesystem locations: 8.2. Setting up a diskless client (Managing NFS and NIS)
Host Manager and: 8.2. Setting up a diskless client (Managing NFS and NIS)
inconsistent information: 8.6.1. Missing and inconsistent client information (Managing NFS and NIS)
JumpStart: 8.8. Brief introduction to JumpStart administration (Managing NFS and NIS)
kernels, booting: 8.3.3. Booting a kernel (Managing NFS and NIS)
missing information: 8.6.1. Missing and inconsistent client information (Managing NFS and NIS)
names: 8.5. Changing a client's name (Managing NFS and NIS)
NFS support: 8.1. NFS support for diskless clients (Managing NFS and NIS)
partitions: 8.1. NFS support for diskless clients (Managing NFS and NIS)
PROM monitor and: 8.3.3. Booting a kernel (Managing NFS and NIS)
reasons for use: 8. Diskless Clients (Managing NFS and NIS)
root filesystems, booting kernel image: 8.3.3. Booting a kernel (Managing NFS and NIS)
setup: 8.2. Setting up a diskless client (Managing NFS and NIS)
troubleshooting: 8.6. Troubleshooting (Managing NFS and NIS)
VFS_MOUNTROOT( ) VFS operation: 8.1. NFS support for diskless clients (Managing NFS and NIS)
diskless nodes, partitioning and: 17.4.2. Effects on diskless nodes (Managing NFS and NIS)
disks, needs for: 10.3.3. What Hardware Configuration? (Building Internet Firewalls)
Dispatcher (SNMPv3 engine): F.1.1. The SNMPv3 Engine (Essential SNMP)
DISPLAY: 2.5. The SSH Agent (SSH, The Secure Shell)
9.3.1. The X Window System (SSH, The Secure Shell)
buggy X libraries, circumventing: 4.3.5. Compilation Flags (SSH, The Secure Shell)
setting: 9.3.6.2. Setting your DISPLAY environment variable (SSH, The Secure Shell)
ssh-add behavior: 6.3.3. Loading Keys with ssh-add (SSH, The Secure Shell)
display filters in ethereal: 5.6.1.2. Display filters (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
displaying
data in collections: 9.2.3.2. Creating a threshold (Essential SNMP)
events: 10.2.1. HP OpenView (Essential SNMP)
10.2.4. The Event Categories Display (Essential SNMP)
MRTG graphs: 13.2. Viewing Graphs (Essential SNMP)
traps: 10.2.7. Monitoring Traps with Perl (Essential SNMP)
DisplayName registry key: 12.4.1.1. Registry keys (Building Internet Firewalls)
displays: 9.3.1. The X Window System (SSH, The Secure Shell)
distance-vector algorithms, routing: 7.4. Interior Routing Protocols (TCP/IP Network Administration)
distfile file: 8.2.1. Primary Master and Slave Servers (DNS and Bind)
Distfiles: 9.6.2. rdist (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Distributed Component Object Model (DCOM): 14.2. Distributed Component Object Model (DCOM) (Building Internet Firewalls)
Distributed File System (Dfs): 17.4.2. Distributed File System (Dfs) (Building Internet Firewalls)
distributed management: 5.4. Centralized versus distributed management (Managing NFS and NIS)
Distributed Management Task Force: 3.3. A Look Ahead (Essential SNMP)
distributed servers, managing: 9.6. Managing Distributed Servers (TCP/IP Network Administration)
distributed systems
forwarding events: 10.2.2.3. Forwarding events and event severities (Essential SNMP)
NMS architecture: 3.2. NMS Architectures (Essential SNMP)
polling: 9.2. External Polling (Essential SNMP)
distribution of maps: 4.2.1. Map distribution (Managing NFS and NIS)
distributors, Unix versions of SSH products: 4. Installation and Compile-Time Configuration (SSH, The Secure Shell)
diversity of defense systems: 3.7. Diversity of Defense (Building Internet Firewalls)
divert macro (sendmail): E.3. m4 sendmail Macros (TCP/IP Network Administration)
divide and conquer technique: 1.1. General Approaches to Troubleshooting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
DMA channels in adapter settings: 3.2. Testing Adapters (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
dmesg command: 2.2.3. Kernel (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
6.1.1. The Interface Name (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DMZ (Demilitarized Zone): 5.1. Some Firewall Definitions (Building Internet Firewalls)
dname parameter (res_search): 15.2.4. The Resolver Library Routines (DNS and Bind)
DNAME records: 10.16.2. A6, DNAMEs, Bitstring Labels, and ip6.arpa (DNS and Bind)
creating aliases with: 16.1.1. CNAMEs Attached to Interior Nodes (DNS and Bind)
reverse mapping and: 10.16.2.2. DNAME records and reverse mapping (DNS and Bind)
dnl command: 10.4.1.1. Building a sendmail.cf with m4 macros (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dnl macro (sendmail): E.3. m4 sendmail Macros (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DNLC (directory name lookup cache): 7.4.3. Server-side caching (Managing NFS and NIS)
DNS (Domain Name Service, Domain Name Server): 2.2.1. Directory Name Service (DNS) (Managing NFS and NIS)
1.3. The Domain Name System in a Nutshell (DNS and Bind)
1.7. Application Layer (TCP/IP Network Administration)
2.7. Naming and Directory Services (Building Internet Firewalls)
10.6. Selecting Services Provided by a Bastion Host (Building Internet Firewalls)
20.1. Domain Name System (DNS) (Building Internet Firewalls)
1.6.1. rsh Suite (R-Commands) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
5.4.3.7. Reverse IP mappings (SSH, The Secure Shell)
5.1. Domain name servers (Managing NFS and NIS)
BIND
configurations: 8.1.1. BIND Configurations (TCP/IP Network Administration)
configuring resolvers: 8.2. Configuring the Resolver (TCP/IP Network Administration)
8.2.1.1. A resolver-only configuration (TCP/IP Network Administration)
caching-only servers, configuring: 8.3.1.1. A caching-only server configuration (TCP/IP Network Administration)
domain names: 5.1.3. NIS and DNS domain names (Managing NFS and NIS)
NIS deriving: 5.1.3. NIS and DNS domain names (Managing NFS and NIS)
enabled on NIS client: 5.2.4. Run NIS on client, enable DNS on NIS client (Managing NFS and NIS)
hostnames not managed by NIS: 5.2.2. Run NIS on client, enable DNS on NIS server (Managing NFS and NIS)
migrating from NIS for host naming: 5.5. Migrating from NIS to DNS for host naming (Managing NFS and NIS)
NIS clients/servers: 5.2.3. Run DNS on NIS clients and servers (Managing NFS and NIS)
NIS comparison: 5.1.1. DNS versus NIS (Managing NFS and NIS)
NIS integration: 5.1.2. DNS integration with NIS (Managing NFS and NIS)
resolver routines: 5.2.3. Run DNS on NIS clients and servers (Managing NFS and NIS)
resolving hostnames to IP addresses: 5.3. Fully qualified and unqualified hostnames (Managing NFS and NIS)
DNS client: 6.1.4. The nameserver Directive (DNS and Bind)
on Windows NT: 12.4.5. Specific Windows NT Services to Disable (Building Internet Firewalls)
clients: 20.1.5.3. Internal DNS clients query the internal server (Building Internet Firewalls)
compared to NIS: 3.3.5. Network Information Service (TCP/IP Network Administration)
configuring hosts for: 6. Configuring Hosts (DNS and Bind)
consequences of: 6.3. Minimizing Pain and Suffering (DNS and Bind)
configuring: 24.2.1.7. DNS (Building Internet Firewalls)
to hide information: 20.1.6. Setting Up DNS to Hide Information, with Subdomains (Building Internet Firewalls)
without hiding information: 20.1.7. Setting Up DNS Without Hiding Information (Building Internet Firewalls)
in screened subnet architecture: 24.1.1.7. DNS (Building Internet Firewalls)
data: 20.1.3. DNS Data (Building Internet Firewalls)
directives: 8.3.3. Zone File Directives (TCP/IP Network Administration)
documentation about, limited: 0. Preface (DNS and Bind)
domain hierarchy: 3.3.1. The Domain Hierarchy (TCP/IP Network Administration)
domains, creating: 3.3.2. Creating Domains and Subdomains (TCP/IP Network Administration)
email and: 5. DNS and Electronic Mail (DNS and Bind)
extensions, working group for: 3.1.1. Handy Mailing Lists and Usenet Newsgroups (DNS and Bind)
fake server: 20.1.5.1. Set up a "fake" DNS server on the bastion host for the outside world to use (Building Internet Firewalls)
filesystems, comparison with: 1.3. The Domain Name System in a Nutshell (DNS and Bind)
2.1. The Domain Name Space (DNS and Bind)
domains and: 2.1.2. Domains (DNS and Bind)
hiding information with: 20.1.5. Setting Up DNS to Hide Information, Without Subdomains (Building Internet Firewalls)
overview: 8.1. BIND: Unix Name Service (TCP/IP Network Administration)
history of: 1.2.1. The History of the Domain Name System (DNS and Bind)
host tables and: 3.2. The Host Table (TCP/IP Network Administration)
how it works: 2. How Does DNS Work? (DNS and Bind)
master name servers, configuring: 8.3.1.2. Master and slave server configurations (TCP/IP Network Administration)
message format: 12.6.1. Showing the Query and Response Messages (DNS and Bind)
15.2.1. DNS Message Format (DNS and Bind)
name server record pointers: 3.3.2. Creating Domains and Subdomains (TCP/IP Network Administration)
named command, configuring: 8.3. Configuring named (TCP/IP Network Administration)
named.conf file: 8.3.1. The named.conf File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
NIS, using with: 6.4.1.2. Using DNS with NIS (DNS and Bind)
outages and IP addresses: 10.3. Sending Traps (Essential SNMP)
overview: 3.3. DNS (TCP/IP Network Administration)
querying with make-ssh-known-hosts utility: 4.1.6. Creating the Serverwide Known-Hosts File (SSH, The Secure Shell)
revealing information to attackers: 20.1.4.5. Revealing too much information to attackers (Building Internet Firewalls)
resource records: 8.3.2. Standard Resource Records (TCP/IP Network Administration)
server for internal hosts: 20.1.5.2. Set up a real DNS server on an internal system for internal hosts to use (Building Internet Firewalls)
Security Extensions (see DNSSEC)
slave servers, configuring: 8.3.1.2. Master and slave server configurations (TCP/IP Network Administration)
system configuration: 4. Getting Started (TCP/IP Network Administration)
SystemEDGE objects: 11.2. SystemEDGE (Essential SNMP)
top-level domains: 3.3.1. The Domain Hierarchy (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Unix, BIND: 3.3.4. BIND, Resolvers, and named (TCP/IP Network Administration)
when to use: 1.5. Must I Use DNS? (DNS and Bind)
Windows2000 and: 16.8. DNS and Windows 2000 (DNS and Bind)
20.1.8. Windows 2000 and DNS (Building Internet Firewalls)
WINS and: 16.7. DNS and WINS (DNS and Bind)
DNS Dynamic Update (see dynamic update)
DNS Mail Exchange (MX): 16.2.6. Configuring SMTP to Work with a Firewall (Building Internet Firewalls)
DNS messages: 7.6.1. Common Syslog Messages (DNS and Bind)
DNS NOTIFY: 4.8.3. SOA Values (DNS and Bind)
10.3. DNS NOTIFY (Zone Change Notification) (DNS and Bind)
BIND support for: 3.1. Getting BIND (DNS and Bind)
dns proxy option (nmbd command): 9.3.2. NetBIOS Name Service (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dns proxy parameter (smb.config file): 9.3.1. Configuring a Samba Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DNS resource records: 4.2.1. The Zone Data Files (DNS and Bind)
dns (sendmail K command value): E.4.5. The sendmail K Command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DNS traffic: 8.1.2. Capacity Planning (DNS and Bind)
calculating: 8.1.2. Capacity Planning (DNS and Bind)
DNS UPDATE (see dynamic update)
dnsquery domain name tool: 10.1.4.1. nslookup and dig (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
DNSSEC (DNS Security Extensions): 11.4. The DNS Security Extensions (DNS and Bind)
dynamic update and: 11.4.9. DNSSEC and Dynamic Update (DNS and Bind)
performance and: 11.4.7. DNSSEC and Performance (DNS and Bind)
using records and: 11.4.6. How the Records Are Used (DNS and Bind)
dnsutl configuration tool: 10.1.4.3. Other tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
dnswalk domain name tool: 10.1.4.2. doc, dnswalk, and lamers (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
10.1.4.2. doc, dnswalk, and lamers (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
doc domain name tool: 10.1.4.2. doc, dnswalk, and lamers (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
documentation, Internet address requests: 4.2.1.1. Obtaining an official network address (TCP/IP Network Administration)
documentation, vendor: B.1. Sources of Information (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
documenting
cabling: 3.1.1. Installing New Cabling (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
networks: 1.3.1. Documentation (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
configuration: 1.3.1. Documentation (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
2. Host Configurations (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
failure to document: 1.3.2.2. Ego management (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
process documentation: 1.3.1. Documentation (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
trend analysis and: 12.2.2.3. Capacity planning (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
plan for: 27.4.7. Planning for Documentation (Building Internet Firewalls)
system after incident: 27.1.6. Snapshot the System (Building Internet Firewalls)
27.4.5. Planning for Snapshots (Building Internet Firewalls)
troubleshooting
screen captures: 11.1.1. Automating Documentation (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
steps: 11.1.1. Automating Documentation (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
12.1. Generic Troubleshooting (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
DocumentRoot directive (Apache): 11.2.1. Configuring Apache on Solaris (TCP/IP Network Administration)
web server document locations: 11.3.4. Defining Where Things Are Stored (TCP/IP Network Administration)
domain administration: 3.3.4. BIND, Resolvers, and named (TCP/IP Network Administration)
domain auth simple parameter (gated): B.8.3. The isis Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
domain controllers: 21.6. NTLM Domains (Building Internet Firewalls)
communication among: 21.6.7. Controller-to-Controller Communication (Building Internet Firewalls)
domain directive: 6.1. The Resolver (DNS and Bind)
E.5.1. domain (DNS and Bind)
BIND 4.9 and: 6.1.3. The search Directive (DNS and Bind)
setting local domain name with: 6.1.1. The Local Domain Name (DNS and Bind)
domain entry (resolv.conf file): 8.2.1. The Resolver Configuration File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
domain field (RIPE database): 4.2.1.2. Obtaining an IN-ADDR.ARPA domain (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Domain Internet Groper tool: 10.1.4.1. nslookup and dig (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
domain lists: 3.4.2.3.2. Control file details (SSH, The Secure Shell)
DOMAIN macro (sendmail): E.3. m4 sendmail Macros (TCP/IP Network Administration)
domain master browser, on Microsoft networks: 20.4.2.1. Domain master browser (Building Internet Firewalls)
domain name aliases: 1.3. The Domain Name System in a Nutshell (DNS and Bind)
domain name labels: 2.1.1. Domain Names (DNS and Bind)
4.5. Host Name Checking (BIND 4.9.4 and Later Versions) (DNS and Bind)
dot (.) separating: 1.3. The Domain Name System in a Nutshell (DNS and Bind)
resource record data and: A.3.1. Data Format (DNS and Bind)
Domain Name Pointer (PTR) records: C.3.1.6. Domain Name Pointer record (TCP/IP Network Administration)
domain name registrars: 3.3.2. Creating Domains and Subdomains (TCP/IP Network Administration)
domain name servers, system configuration: 4. Getting Started (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Domain Name Service (see DNS)
5.1. Domain name servers (Managing NFS and NIS)
domain name space: 2.1. The Domain Name Space (DNS and Bind)
CIDR and: 3.2.4. Checking That Your Network Is Registered (DNS and Bind)
Domain Name System (see DNS)
1.7. Application Layer (TCP/IP Network Administration)
domain names: 1.3. The Domain Name System in a Nutshell (DNS and Bind)
2.1.1. Domain Names (DNS and Bind)
2.1.2. Domains (DNS and Bind)
3.3.3. Domain Names (TCP/IP Network Administration)
appending origin to: 4.4.1. Appending Domain Names (DNS and Bind)
as argument in RP record: 7.2.4.2. Responsible Person (DNS and Bind)
choosing: 3.2. Choosing a Domain Name (DNS and Bind)
under gTLD: 3.2.3.2. The generic top-level domains (DNS and Bind)
collisions of (see name collisions)
compressing/expanding: 15.2.3. Domain Name Compression (DNS and Bind)
default, option for: 12.3. Option Settings (DNS and Bind)
FQDNs: 7.1. Parameter Settings (Essential SNMP)
fully qualified (FQDNs): 2.1.1. Domain Names (DNS and Bind)
6.1.2. The Search List (DNS and Bind)
how to read: 2.2.3. Reading Domain Names (DNS and Bind)
local: 6.1.1. The Local Domain Name (DNS and Bind)
can't be looked up: 14.7.1. Local Name Can't Be Looked Up (DNS and Bind)
looking up local and remote with nslookup: 4.7.3. Testing Your Setup with nslookup (DNS and Bind)
mail exchangers for: 5.1. MX Records (DNS and Bind)
mapping (see mapping)
ndots setting for: 6.1.6. The options Directive (DNS and Bind)
obtaining: 4.4.1. Obtaining a Domain Name (TCP/IP Network Administration)
registering: 3.2.5. Registering Your Zones (DNS and Bind)
4.4.2. Registering a Domain (TCP/IP Network Administration)
resource record data and: A.3.1. Data Format (DNS and Bind)
servers for (see primary master name servers slave name servers)
setting
for host: 4.7.3.1. Set the local domain name (DNS and Bind)
search order for: 6.1.3. The search Directive (DNS and Bind)
storing: 15.2.2. Domain Name Storage (DNS and Bind)
SystemEDGE extended objects: 11.2. SystemEDGE (Essential SNMP)
trailing dot (.) in: 14.3.6. Missing Dot at the End of a Domain Name in a Zone Data File (DNS and Bind)
A.1. Master File Format (DNS and Bind)
domain names and netgroups: 3.3.2. Netgroups (Managing NFS and NIS)
domain names (Linux): 9.1.2.2. The /etc/exports file (TCP/IP Network Administration)
domain option (pppd): A.2. The PPP Daemon (TCP/IP Network Administration)
domain option (share command): 9.1.2.1. The share command (TCP/IP Network Administration)
domain setting (smb.config file): 9.3.1. Configuring a Samba Server (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DOMAIN source file
DNS features: E.3.4. DOMAIN (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DNS macros: E.3.4. DOMAIN (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DOMAIN source file (sendmail): E.3.4. DOMAIN (TCP/IP Network Administration)
domainname command: 3.2.2. Installing the NIS master server (Managing NFS and NIS)
3.3.8. NIS domains (Managing NFS and NIS)
3.3.8. NIS domains (Managing NFS and NIS)
9.4. Network Information Service (TCP/IP Network Administration)
domains: 1.3. The Domain Name System in a Nutshell (DNS and Bind)
2.1.2. Domains (DNS and Bind)
2.1.2. Domains (DNS and Bind)
3.3.8. NIS domains (Managing NFS and NIS)
accounting: 3.1. Masters, slaves, and clients (Managing NFS and NIS)
aliases: 5.1.4. Domain aliases (Managing NFS and NIS)
aliases map: 4.4. Managing multiple domains (Managing NFS and NIS)
binding: 3.3.10. The ypbind daemon (Managing NFS and NIS)
cache initialization file: 8.3.4. The Cache Initialization File (TCP/IP Network Administration)
caching-only server: 8.1.1. BIND Configurations (TCP/IP Network Administration)
creating multiple: 3.3.8. NIS domains (Managing NFS and NIS)
database definitions: 3.3.8. NIS domains (Managing NFS and NIS)
default: 14.3.12. Local Domain Name Not Set (DNS and Bind)
default, superuse and: 3.3.8. NIS domains (Managing NFS and NIS)
definition of: 3.3.8. NIS domains (Managing NFS and NIS)
delegating: 2.3. Delegation (DNS and Bind)
14.3.9. Missing Subdomain Delegation (DNS and Bind)
14.3.10. Incorrect Subdomain Delegation (DNS and Bind)
old information: 14.7.7.1. Old delegation information (DNS and Bind)
dividing into: 4.1.1. Dividing a network into domains (Managing NFS and NIS)
DNS
creating: 3.3.2. Creating Domains and Subdomains (TCP/IP Network Administration)
hierarchy: 3.3.1. The Domain Hierarchy (TCP/IP Network Administration)
top-level: 3.3.1. The Domain Hierarchy (TCP/IP Network Administration)
downloading for inspection, nslookup command: 8.4. Using nslookup (TCP/IP Network Administration)
edu domain: 5.1.1. DNS versus NIS (Managing NFS and NIS)
getting information about: 3.2.2. Where in the World Do I Fit? (DNS and Bind)
international domains: 3.2.2. Where in the World Do I Fit? (DNS and Bind)
U.S. domains: 3.2.3. Back in the U.S.A. (DNS and Bind)
graphing traffic measurements in: 8.3.1.2. Web mode (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
group file: 4.4. Managing multiple domains (Managing NFS and NIS)
hierarchical naming: 4.1.2. Domain names (Managing NFS and NIS)
hosts, binding: 3.3.8. NIS domains (Managing NFS and NIS)
hosts map: 4.4. Managing multiple domains (Managing NFS and NIS)
in-addr.arpa: 9.4.5. Delegating an in-addr.arpa Zone (DNS and Bind)
4.2.1.2. Obtaining an IN-ADDR.ARPA domain (TCP/IP Network Administration)
internationalization and: 2.2.1. Top-Level Domains (DNS and Bind)
Internet Domain Name service: 3.3.8.1. Internet domains versus NIS domains (Managing NFS and NIS)
Internet domains versus NIS domains: 3.3.8.1. Internet domains versus NIS domains (Managing NFS and NIS)
levels and: 2.1.2. Domains (DNS and Bind)
listing machines in: 10.1.4.1. nslookup and dig (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
managing multiple: 4.4. Managing multiple domains (Managing NFS and NIS)
master name server: 8.1.1. BIND Configurations (TCP/IP Network Administration)
names: 4.1.2. Domain names (Managing NFS and NIS)
DNS/NIS: 5.1.3. NIS and DNS domain names (Managing NFS and NIS)
names of (see domain names)
NIS: 3.1. Masters, slaves, and clients (Managing NFS and NIS)
9.4. Network Information Service (TCP/IP Network Administration)
nonexistent domain message: 12.7.3. No PTR Record for Name Server's Address (DNS and Bind)
original seven top-level: 2.2.1. Top-Level Domains (DNS and Bind)
parenting and (see parenting)
passwd file: 4.4. Managing multiple domains (Managing NFS and NIS)
research: 3.1. Masters, slaves, and clients (Managing NFS and NIS)
servers, allocating: 4.1.3. Number of NIS servers per domain (Managing NFS and NIS)
slave server: 8.1.1. BIND Configurations (TCP/IP Network Administration)
source files: 4.4. Managing multiple domains (Managing NFS and NIS)
vs. subdomains: 2.1.2. Domains (DNS and Bind)
top-level (see top-level domains)
whois lookup service for: 3.2.2. Where in the World Do I Fit? (DNS and Bind)
3.2.2.1. Using whois (DNS and Bind)
zones: 8.1. BIND: Unix Name Service (TCP/IP Network Administration)
domains, on Microsoft networks: 20.4.1. Domains and Workgroups (Building Internet Firewalls)
domaintable (sendmail database feature): E.3.2. FEATURE (TCP/IP Network Administration)
Domino server: 16.5. Lotus Notes and Domino (Building Internet Firewalls)
DontReadStdin (keyword): 7.4.5.6. Backgrounding a remote command (SSH, The Secure Shell)
DOS and NFS: 10. PC/NFS Clients (Managing NFS and NIS)
(see also 10. PC/NFS Clients )
DOS attacks (denial of service): 2.1.3. netstat (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
3.3.3.1. Security and ICMP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
3.3.4.2. echoping (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
DoS (denial of service): 12.1.1. Assessing the Threat (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dot (.)
local domain name and: 6.1.1. The Local Domain Name (DNS and Bind)
ndots option: E.5.6. options ndots (4.9+) (DNS and Bind)
ndots setting for: 6.1.6. The options Directive (DNS and Bind)
indicating root node: 1.3. The Domain Name System in a Nutshell (DNS and Bind)
separating domain name labels: 1.3. The Domain Name System in a Nutshell (DNS and Bind)
trailing: 4.2.4. SOA Records (DNS and Bind)
6.1.2. The Search List (DNS and Bind)
indicating absolute domain name: 2.1.1. Domain Names (DNS and Bind)
A.1. Master File Format (DNS and Bind)
in domain names: 14.3.6. Missing Dot at the End of a Domain Name in a Zone Data File (DNS and Bind)
importance of not omitting: 4.4.1. Appending Domain Names (DNS and Bind)
troubleshooting: 14.3.6. Missing Dot at the End of a Domain Name in a Zone Data File (DNS and Bind)
dot (.) files, disabling creation of: 17.1.4.2.3. Disabling the creation of directories and certain files (Building Internet Firewalls)
dotted-decimal notation (.), in OIDs: 2.3.1. Naming OIDs (Essential SNMP)
dotted decimal notation (IP addresses): 2.2. The IP Address (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dotted notation: 7.1. Overview of SNMP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
7.2.1.1. snmpget (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
8.4.1.1. mrtg configuration file (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
dotted-octet notation: 2.6.6. Mapping Addresses to Names (DNS and Bind)
CIDR and: 3.2.4. Checking That Your Network Is Registered (DNS and Bind)
double-reverse lookups: 20.1.4.3. Mismatched data between the hostname and IP address DNS trees (Building Internet Firewalls)
20.1.5.1. Set up a "fake" DNS server on the bastion host for the outside world to use (Building Internet Firewalls)
down preference (gated): B.6. Interface Statements (TCP/IP Network Administration)
draft RFCs: 1.2. RFCs and SNMP Versions (Essential SNMP)
D. SNMP RFCs (Essential SNMP)
draft standards (RFCs): 1.1.2. Protocol Standards (TCP/IP Network Administration)
drec log tool: 9.1.2.2. MGEN (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
drift files (time settings): 11.3. NTP (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
driver configuration parameters: 2.2.3. Kernel (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Driver Options field (printconf-gui): 9.2.1.1. The printcap file (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DROP keyword (iptables command): 12.7.2.1. Defining iptables filter rules (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dropped packets in measurements: 9.1.2.1. spray (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
DSA (Digital Signature Algorithm): C.5.2. Digital Signature Algorithms (Building Internet Firewalls)
3.9.1.2. Digital Signature Algorithm (DSA) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
key generation, Open SSH: 6.2.3. Generating RSA/DSA Keys for OpenSSH (SSH, The Secure Shell)
DSAAuthentication: 5.5.1.2. Public-key authentication (SSH, The Secure Shell)
dsmtp mailer: 10.4.1.1. Building a sendmail.cf with m4 macros (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DSN (Delivery Status Notification), error codes: 10.6.2. Transforming the Address (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dsniff security tools: 5.7.1. Switch Security (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
6.6. Politics and Security (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
A.4. Sources for Tools (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
DSO (Dynamic Shared Object): 11.3.1. Loading Dynamic Shared Objects (TCP/IP Network Administration)
DSS (Digital Signature Standard): 3.9.1.2. Digital Signature Algorithm (DSA) (SSH, The Secure Shell)
C.5.2. Digital Signature Algorithms (Building Internet Firewalls)
dual-homed hosts: 5.1. Some Firewall Definitions (Building Internet Firewalls)
architecture of: 6.1.2. Dual-Homed Host (Building Internet Firewalls)
as firewall: 10.10.3. Turning Off Routing (Building Internet Firewalls)
nonrouting: 10.2.1. Nonrouting Dual-Homed Hosts (Building Internet Firewalls)
proxy services (see proxy services)
dual-port switches: 5.2. Access to Traffic (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
dump-file option (named): C.2.5. The options Statement (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dump files
cache & data section: 13.6.3.2. The Cache & Data section (TCP/IP Network Administration)
hints section: 13.6.3.3. The Hints section (TCP/IP Network Administration)
zone tables: 13.6.3.1. The zone table section (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dumpdb command: 7.1.1. ndc and controls (BIND 8) (DNS and Bind)
13.6.3. Cache Corruption (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dumpel utility: 12.3.1. Setting Up System Logs Under Windows NT (Building Internet Firewalls)
DUN (Dial-Up Networking): 16.4. Dialup Connections (DNS and Bind)
Windows 98 and: 6.4.9. Windows 98 (DNS and Bind)
Dunlap, Kevin: 1.4. The History of BIND (DNS and Bind)
duplex mode of lines: A. Using Input and Output Octets (Essential SNMP)
duplicate IP addresses: 2.1.6. arp (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
6.2.1. IP Address Management (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
duplicate packets: 3.3.2.2. Interpreting results (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
duplicate queries: 7.6.2.1. BIND 4.9 and 8 statistics (DNS and Bind)
duplicate request caches
NFS servers: 18.1.1. Identifying NFS retransmissions (Managing NFS and NIS)
duplicate request caches, NFS servers: 7.2.3. Request retransmission (Managing NFS and NIS)
duplicating traffic on ports: 5.2. Access to Traffic (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
DURATION option (xinetd): 12.5.2. Controlling Access with xinetd (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dynamic address allocation: 6.2.1. IP Address Management (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
dynamic address allocation, dhcpd.conf file: 9.5.1. dhcpd.conf (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dynamic assignment: 4.2.2. Assigning Host Addresses (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dynamic-bootp argument (dhcpd range parameter): 9.5.1. dhcpd.conf (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dynamic-bootp-lease-cutoff parameter: 9.5.1. dhcpd.conf (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dhcpd: D.3.2. Configuration Parameters (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dynamic-bootp-lease-length parameter: 9.5.1. dhcpd.conf (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dhcpd: D.3.2. Configuration Parameters (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dynamic DNS: 6.2.1. IP Address Management (Network Troubleshooting Tools)
Dynamic DNS (DDNS): 3.6.2. Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dynamic entries, ARP table: 13.2.3. IP to MAC address mappings (Managing NFS and NIS)
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (see DHCP)
dynamic packet filtering, FTP and: 17.1.1. Packet Filtering Characteristics of FTP (Building Internet Firewalls)
dynamic routing: 7.1. Common Routing Configurations (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dynamic routing tables: 4.3. Planning Routing (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dynamic severity: 7.5. Logging in BIND 8 and 9 (DNS and Bind)
Dynamic Shared Object (DSO): 11.3.1. Loading Dynamic Shared Objects (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dynamic update: 10.2. DNS Dynamic Update (DNS and Bind)
BIND support for: 3.1. Getting BIND (DNS and Bind)
DNSSEC and: 11.4.9. DNSSEC and Dynamic Update (DNS and Bind)
restricting with TSIG: 11.1.4. Using TSIG (DNS and Bind)
Windows2000 and: 16.8.1. How Windows 2000 Uses Dynamic Update (DNS and Bind)
dynamically allocated ports: 2.6.3. Sockets (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dynamically assigning addresses: 3.6.2. Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (TCP/IP Network Administration)
dynamically loadable modules: 5.1.1. Using Dynamically Loadable Modules (TCP/IP Network Administration)
httpd.conf file: 11.3.1. Loading Dynamic Shared Objects (TCP/IP Network Administration)


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