home | O'Reilly's CD bookshelfs | FreeBSD | Linux | Cisco | Cisco Exam    

Book HomeBook HomeSearch this book

Symbols | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z

Index: P

PACK_MESSAGE procedure : C.10.3. The PACK_MESSAGE procedure
package variables, stored functions and : 17.4. Restrictions on PL/SQL Functions in SQL
packages
1.4.3.10. Modular construction
1.6.8. Packages
16. Packages
Booch diagram : 16.2.4. Public and Private Package Elements
built-in
1.4.3.6. Built-in packages
1.6.3. Built-in packages
built-in, reference on : C. Built-In Packages
cursors in : 6.4.4. The Cursor RETURN Clause
data structures in : 16.5. Package Data
debugging messages in : 24.2.9. Build Debugging Messages into Your Packages
declaring cursors in : 16.3.2. Declaring Package Cursors
developing around : 1.7.3. Center All Development Around Packages
documenting : 3.7. Documenting the Entire Package
encapsulating data structure access : 1.7.2. Synchronize Program and Data Structures
of exceptions only : 16.3.1.1. A package of exceptions
formatting : 3.5. Formatting Packages
functions in, calling : 17.5. Calling Packaged Functions in SQL
granting execute authority to : 23.2.1. Execute Authority on Stored Objects
initialization section
purity level assertions in : 17.5.2. Asserting Purity Level with Package Initialization Section
initializing : 16.6. Package Initialization
of magic values only : 16.3.1.2. A package of magic values
minimizing interdependencies : 25.2.4. Creating Packages with Minimal Interdependencies
modifying persistent objects : 18.5.4. Approach 4: Use an Object and a PL/SQL Container Package
naming : 22.1.3. Name Packages and Their Elements to Reflect the Packaged Structure
numbers-to-words : 17.8.7. Recursive Processing in a SQL Statement
pinning into SGA shared pool : 25.2.2. Pin Critical Code into the SGA
public versus private elements : 16.2.4. Public and Private Package Elements
purity level of : 17.5.1. The RESTRICT_REFERENCES Pragma
referencing elements of : 23.1.4. Key Concepts for Program Execution
rights models : 18.3.7.3. Rights model
specification
16.2.1. The Specification
16.3. The Package Specification
STANDARD : 8.3.1. Named System Exceptions
storing spefifications for : 1.7.3. Center All Development Around Packages
synchronizing body and specification : 16.4.2. Synchronize Body with Package
toggles in : 1.7.3. Center All Development Around Packages
variables in : B.2.2. No Direct Stored Package Variable References
reducing memory usage of : 25.2.5. Reducing Memory Usage of Package Variables
padding strings
11.1.11. The RPAD function
11.1.8. The LPAD function
parameters : 15.6. Parameters
accepted in PARAMETERS clause : 21.4.3. Properties
actual versus formal : 15.6.3. Actual and Formal Parameters
Boolean : 22.7.2. Use Self-Identifying Parameters (Avoid Boolean Values)
case consistency of : 22.7.4. Ensure Case Consistency of Parameters
declaring : 21.4.4. Correct Declaration of Properties
default values of
B.2.4. No Default Parameter Values
15.6.5. Default Values
22.7.5. Default Values and Remote Procedure Calls
design tips for : 22.7. Tips for Parameter Design
documenting : 22.7.1. Document All Parameters and Their Functions
IN mode : 15.6.2.1. IN mode
IN OUT mode
15.6.2.3. The IN OUT mode
22.7.3. Assign Values to All OUT and IN OUT Parameters
increasing number of : 22.5.3. Use Parameters Liberally
mapping for external procedures : 21.4. Mapping Parameters
module, collections as : 19.2.2.3. Collections as module parameters
modules without : 22.4. Be Wary of Modules Without Any Parameters
naming : 22.1.2. Develop Consistent Naming Conventions for Your Formal Parameters
OUT mode
15.6.2.2. OUT mode
22.7.3. Assign Values to All OUT and IN OUT Parameters
for overloaded modules : 15.8.4. Restrictions on Overloading
package data and : 25.4.4. Use Package Data to Avoid Passing "Bulky" Parameter Values
passing by reference : 21.4.2. More Syntax: The PARAMETERS Clause
tables as : 10.5.4. Passing PL/SQL Tables as Parameters
validating with assertion modules : 22.2.4. Use Assertion Modules to Validate Parameters and Assumptions
PARAMETERS clause : 21.4.1. Datatype Conversion
declaring parameters : 21.4.4. Correct Declaration of Properties
parameters possible in : 21.4.3. Properties
parameters, cursor : 6.10. Cursor Parameters
parent block : (see nested blocks)
PARSE procedure : C.14.15. The PARSE procedure
parsing SQL statements : 6.2.2. Cursor Operations
parsing strings : 11.2.1. Parsing a Name
part-of relationship : 18.1.4.3. Inheritance
partitioned tables, ROWID datatype for : 4.2.3.6. The ROWID datatype
partitioning table to store array : 10.9.4.2. Partitioning a PL/SQL table to store an array
passing
collection arguments : 19.8.3. Call by Reference or Call by Value
parameters by reference : 21.4.2. More Syntax: The PARAMETERS Clause
performance
analyzing : 25.1. Analyzing Program Performance
implicit cursors and : 6.3.2.1. Inefficiencies of implicit cursors
implicit data conversions and : 4.2.8.3. Drawbacks of implicit conversions
local variables and : 25.4.3. Rely on Local Variables to Improve Performance
package data and : 25.4.4. Use Package Data to Avoid Passing "Bulky" Parameter Values
stored functions and : 17.1. Looking at the Problem
time, using progress box : 22.6.3. Progress Box as ADT
persistence
encapsulation and : 18.2.2.2. DDL usage
REFs and : 18.2.3. Adding Complex Data Structures
persistent objects
modifying : 18.5. Modifying Persistent Objects
referring to : 18.4.2. OID, VALUE, REF, and DEREF
PGA (Program Global Area) : 25.3.1. Use Package Data to Minimize SQL Access
phonetic string comparisons : 11.1.13. The SOUNDEX function
pinning packages into SGA shared pool : 25.2.2. Pin Critical Code into the SGA
pipes : (see DBMS_PIPE package)
PL/SQL
applications, tuning : 25. Tuning PL/SQL Applications
access to compiled code : 25.2. Tuning Access to Compiled Code
access to data : 25.3. Tuning Access to Your Data
analyzing performance : 25.1. Analyzing Program Performance
optimizing algorithms : 25.4. Tuning Your Algorithms
best practices : 1.7. Best Practices for PL/SQL Excellence
blocks : (see modules)
C interface, datatypes and : 21.4.1. Datatype Conversion
and client-server architecture : 1.1. What Is PL/SQL?
collections in : 19.2.2.1. Collection variables
datatype subtypes in : 4.6.1. Declaring Subtypes
debugging : (see debugging)
definition of : 1.1. What Is PL/SQL?
exceptions : (see exceptions)
for I/O-intensive SQL : 25.3.6. Use PL/SQL to Improve Performance of IO-Intensive SQL
functions in SQL : (see stored functions, PL/SQL)
identifiers : (see identifiers)
integration with server (example) : 19.7. Example: PL/SQL-to-Server Integration
language
coding : (see coding)
structure of : 2.7. Block Structure
language of : 2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set
lexical units of : 2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set
literals : (see literals)
loops : (see loops)
memory-based code architecture : 23.1.3. Memory-Based Architecture of PL/SQL Code
modules : 2.7. Block Structure
objects : (see objects)
origins of : 1.3. The Origins of PL/SQL
packages : (see packages)
Programming Companion Utilities Guide : A. What's on the Companion Disk?
Release 1.1 : 10.9.4.3. Features of the array package
Release 2.2 : 6.12. Cursor Variables
Release 2.3
6.12. Cursor Variables
10.1.1. PL/SQL Tables
10.8. PL/SQL Table Enhancements in PL/SQL Release 2.3
tracing execution : 26. Tracing PL/SQL Execution
variables : (see variables)
version 8 enhancements : 25.5. Overview of PL/SQL8 Enhancements
versions of : 1.4. PL/SQL Versions
Release 2.1 : 15.8.4. Restrictions on Overloading
Version 1.1 : B. Calling Stored Procedures from PL/SQL Version 1.1
Version 2 : 15.6.1.1. %TYPE and %ROWTYPE
Version 2.0
B.1. Using Stubs to Talk to Server-Side PL/SQL
1.4.3. PL/SQL Version 2.0
23.4. Remote Procedure Calls
working with multiple : 1.4.1. Working with Multiple Versions of PL/SQL
wrapper : 1.4.5.1. The PL/SQL wrapper
PL/SQL tables : (see index-by tables)
PLS-00452 error : 17.5.1.1. Pragma violation errors
PLS_INTEGER data type : 25.4.5. Use PLS_INTEGER for All Integer Operations
PLS_INTEGER datatype : 4.2.1.3. The PLS_INTEGER datatype
pointers to objects : (see references to objects)
polymorphism : 18.1.4.4. Polymorphism
PORT_STRING function : C.16.10. The PORT_STRING function
portability : 1.3.1. Improved Application Portability with PL/SQL
POSITIVE datatype : 4.2.1.1. Binary integer datatypes
Post-Query trigger : 6.3.2.1. Inefficiencies of implicit cursors
POWER function : 13.1.14. The POWER function
PRAGMA keyword : 2.6. The PRAGMA Keyword
pragmas
EXCEPTION_INIT : 8.3.3.1. The EXCEPTION_INIT pragma
RESTRICT_REFEFRENCES : 17.3. Requirements for Stored Functions in SQL
RESTRICT_REFERENCES
17.5.1. The RESTRICT_REFERENCES Pragma
17.7.1. Manual Application of Pragmas
precedence, identifiers in cursors : 6.4.3. Identifier Precedence in a Cursor
precision : 4.2.1.2. Decimal numeric datatypes
predefined system exceptions : 8.3.1. Named System Exceptions
PRIOR function
10.8.2.7. The PRIOR function
19.6.7. PRIOR(i), NEXT(i)
private
elements, package
16.2.2. The Body
16.2.4. Public and Private Package Elements
global data : 16.5.4. Global Private Data
privileges
collections : 19.8.1. Privileges
of objects : 18.3.7. Privileges
procedural code, avoiding : 25.3.5. Avoid Procedural Code When Possible
procedures
(see also functions; modules)
1.4.3.10. Modular construction
15. Procedures and Functions
15.4. Procedures
22.1.1. Make Sure the Module Name Explains the Module
changing trigger code to : 25.3.7. Keep Database Triggers Small
for collections : 19.6. Collection Built-Ins
external
(see external procedures)
1.4.7.5. External procedures
headers of : 15.4.2. Procedure Header
IN OUT parameters in : 22.2.1.2. Switch to a procedure with IN OUT parameters
local : 15.7. Local Modules
parameters of : 15.6. Parameters
records as parameters : 9.1.4. Guidelines for Using Records
remote
22.7.5. Default Values and Remote Procedure Calls
23.4. Remote Procedure Calls
RETURN statements in : 15.5.8.5. RETURN statement in a procedure
shared : 23.1.1. Executing Procedures
stored, from PL/SQL Version 1.1 : B. Calling Stored Procedures from PL/SQL Version 1.1
synonyms for : 23.2.2. Creating Synonyms for Stored Objects
tables as parameters for : 10.5.4. Passing PL/SQL Tables as Parameters
production support : 26.2. Tracing for Production Support
Program Global Area (PGA) : 25.3.1. Use Package Data to Minimize SQL Access
PROGRAM_ERROR exception : 8.3.1. Named System Exceptions
programmer-defined
exceptions
8.3.2. Named Programmer-Defined Exceptions
8.3.4. Unnamed Programmer-Defined Exceptions
scope of : 8.4.1.1. Scope of programmer-defined exception
records
1.4.3.3. Programmer-defined records
9.4. Programmer-Defined Records
subtypes : 1.4.4.4. Programmer-defined subtypes
programmer-defined datatypes : (see subtypes)
programmer-defined PL/SQL functions : (see stored functions, PL/SQL)
programming : (see coding)
Programming Companion Utilities Guide : A. What's on the Companion Disk?
programs
analyzing performance of : 25.1. Analyzing Program Performance
enabling tracing of : 26.1.1. Enabling Program Units for Tracing
pinning into SGA shared pool : 25.2.2. Pin Critical Code into the SGA
shared, executing : 23.1. Executing Stored Code
testing : 24.2.5. Change and Test One Area of Code at a Time
progress boxes : 22.6.3. Progress Box as ADT
progress package : 22.6.4.1. The progress package specification
propagation of exceptions : 8.4.2. Propagation of an Exception
properties, object : (see attributes, object)
privileges, object views : 20.7.2. Privileges
pseudoinstructions : 2.6. The PRAGMA Keyword
public
elements, package
16.2.1. The Specification
16.2.4. Public and Private Package Elements
global data : 16.5.3. Global Public Data
PURGE procedure : C.10.4. The PURGE procedure
PURGE_LOG procedure : C.13.3. The PURGE_LOG procedure
PURGE_LOST_DB procedure : C.15.16. The PURGE_LOST_DB procedure
PURGE_MIXED procedure : C.15.15. The PURGE_MIXED procedure
purity levels, packages : 17.5.1. The RESTRICT_REFERENCES Pragma
PUT procedure : C.17.1.8. The PUT procedure
PUT_LINE function : 23.1.2. Executing Functions
PUT_LINE procedure
C.9.7. The PUT_LINE procedure
C.17.1.10. The PUT_LINE procedure
PUTF procedure : C.17.1.9. The PUTF procedure


Symbols | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z
The Oracle Library Navigation

Copyright (c) 2000 O'Reilly & Associates. All rights reserved.

Library Home Oracle PL/SQL Programming, 2nd. Ed. Guide to Oracle 8i Features Oracle Built-in Packages Advanced PL/SQL Programming with Packages Oracle Web Applications Oracle PL/SQL Language Pocket Reference Oracle PL/SQL Built-ins Pocket Reference






??????????????@Mail.ru