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Index: C

calendar : (see date)
case
consistency of : 22.7.4. Ensure Case Consistency of Parameters
INITCAP function : 11.1.4. The INITCAP function
LOWER function : 11.1.7. The LOWER function
and readability : 3.1.2. Using Case to Aid Readability
sensitivity
2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set
2.3. Literals
UPPER function : 11.1.16. The UPPER function
CAST procedure
object views and : 20.1. Example: Using Object Views
CAST pseudo-function : 19.5.2. The CAST Pseudo-function
casting collections : 19.5.2.1. Casting a named collection
CDE : (see Cooperative Development Environment)
CEIL (ceiling) function : 13.1.6. The CEIL function
century : (see date)
CHANGE procedure : C.5.2. The CHANGE procedure
CHAR datatype
2.3. Literals
4.2.3.1. The CHAR datatype
converting to VARCHAR2 : 4.2.3.2. The VARCHAR2 and VARCHAR datatypes
converting to/from ROWID
14.2.1. The CHARTOROWID function
14.2.5. The ROWIDTOCHAR function
with LENGTH function : 11.1.6. The LENGTH function
character datatypes, in overloaded modules : 15.8.4. Restrictions on Overloading
character functions : 11. Character Functions
character sets : 14.2.2. The CONVERT function
characters
adding to strings : 11.1.11. The RPAD function
converting to numbers, package for : 17.8.7. Recursive Processing in a SQL Statement
datatypes for : 4.2.3. Character Datatypes
extracting from strings : 11.1.14. The SUBSTR function
NLS datatypes for : 4.2.6. NLS Character Datatypes
replacing in strings
11.1.10. The REPLACE function
11.1.15. The TRANSLATE function
stripping from strings
11.1.12. The RTRIM function
11.1.9. The LTRIM function
word wrap : 11.2.2. Implementing Word Wrap for Long Text
CHARSETFORM property : 21.4.3.4. CHARSETID and CHARSETFORM properties
CHARSETID property : 21.4.3.4. CHARSETID and CHARSETFORM properties
CHARTOROWID function : 14.2.1. The CHARTOROWID function
checking for NULL values : 4.3.2. Checking for NULL Values
child block : (see nested blocks)
child records : (see records)
CHR function : 11.1.2. The CHR function
class instances : 18.1.4.2. Classification
classes : (see object types)
classification of objects : 18.1.4.2. Classification
clearing tables : 10.7. Clearing the PL/SQL Table
client-side SQL : 25.3.3. Avoid Client-Side SQL
CLOB datatype
1.4.7.6. Large object support
4.2.7.3. The CLOB datatype
EMPTY_CLOB function : 13.2.3. The EMPTY_CLOB function
clock : (see time)
CLOSE statement
(see also cursors)
6.2.2. Cursor Operations
6.8. Closing Cursors
CLOSE_CURSOR procedure : C.14.3. The CLOSE_CURSOR procedure
CLOSE_DATABASE_LINK procedure : C.12.1. The CLOSE_DATABASE_LINK procedure
closing cursors : 6.8. Closing Cursors
code
compiled, tuning access to : 25.2. Tuning Access to Compiled Code
critical, pinning into SGA : 25.2.2. Pin Critical Code into the SGA
encrypting : 23.7. Encrypting Stored Code
memory-based architecture : 23.1.3. Memory-Based Architecture of PL/SQL Code
procedural, avoiding : 25.3.5. Avoid Procedural Code When Possible
repetetive : (see redundancy)
reusing : 1.7.1. Write as Little Code as Possible
shared, executing : 23.1. Executing Stored Code
structuring of : 1.7.5. Structured Code and Other Best Practices
style of : 1.7.4. Standardize Your PL/SQL Development Environment
testing : 24.2.5. Change and Test One Area of Code at a Time
coding : 1.2. The Concept of Programming in Oracle Applications
analyzing size of : 23.6.3. Analyzing the Size of PL/SQL Code
anticipating errors : (see exceptions)
avoiding repetitive : 22.3. Take Full Advantage of Local Modularization
comments in : (see comments)
considering parameter case : 22.7.4. Ensure Case Consistency of Parameters
creating independent modules : 22.5. Create Independent Modules
cross-referencing source code : 23.6.5. Cross-Referencing Source Code
in databases : 23. Managing Code in the Database
documenting : 24.2.6. Document and Back Up Your Efforts
errors : (see errors; exceptions)
finding strings in : 23.6.4. Displaying and Searching Source Code
hints for effective
1.5. Advice for Oracle Programmers
3. Effective Coding Style
4.2.8.3. Drawbacks of implicit conversions
22. Code Design Tips
commenting : 3.6. Using Comments Effectively
exception handling : 8.10. RAISE Nothing but Exceptions
IF statements : 5.1.4. Nested IF Statements
loops : 7.7. Tips for PL/SQL Loops
nested records : 9.7.1. Example of Nested Records
parameters : 22.7. Tips for Parameter Design
records : 9.1.3.3. Leaner, cleaner code
increasing readability of code : 5.2.2.1. Improving the readability of your program
layout of : 3.1. Fundamentals of Effective Layout
recursive processing : 17.8.7. Recursive Processing in a SQL Statement
removing unused variables : 4.7.6. Remove Unused Variables from Programs
sequential processing : 17.8.6. Sequential Processing Against a Column's Value
simplifying logic with variables : 4.7.9. Use Variables to Hide Complex Logic
testing programs : 2.5.2. Multiline Comment Syntax
collections
adding/removing elements from : 19.4.3. Adding and Removing Elements
built-in methods for : 19.6. Collection Built-Ins
casting : 19.5.2.1. Casting a named collection
choosing which kind to use : 19.9. Which Collection Type Should I Use?
collection variables
19.2.2.1. Collection variables
19.4.1. Initializing Collection Variables
comparing : 19.4.4. Comparing Collections
creating : 19.2. Creating the New Collections
data dictionary entries for : 19.8.2. Data Dictionary
declaring as datatype : 19.2.2. Collections in PL/SQL
index-by tables : (see index-by tables)
nested tables : (see nested tables)
passing arguments of : 19.8.3. Call by Reference or Call by Value
PL/SQL-to-server integration example : 19.7. Example: PL/SQL-to-Server Integration
privileges : 19.8.1. Privileges
pseudo-functions : 19.5. Collection Pseudo-Functions
types of : 19.1. Types of Collections
VARRAYs : (see VARRAYs)
COLUMN_VALUE procedure : C.14.4. The COLUMN_VALUE procedure
columns
(see also records)
9.1.1. Different Types of Records
abbreviations for : 3.2. Formatting SQL Statements
aliases for
3.2. Formatting SQL Statements
6.7. Column Aliases in Cursors
9.3.2. Setting the Record's Column Names
BFILE, initializing : 13.2.1. The BFILENAME function
choosing for cursor-based record : 9.3.1. Choosing Columns for a Cursor Record
collections as : 19.2.1.1. Collection as a "column" in a conventional table
collections as datatypes for : 19.1. Types of Collections
names for : 1.7.5. Structured Code and Other Best Practices
naming procedure : 17.6. Column/Function Name Precedence
objects for : 18.1.2. Some Simple Examples
VALUE operator with : 18.4.2.3. VALUE
partial values of : 17.8.5. GROUP BY Partial Column Values
represented by variables : 4.7.7. Use %TYPE When a Variable Represents a Column
sequential processing against value : 17.8.6. Sequential Processing Against a Column's Value
synchronization with : 4.5.1.1. Synchronization with database columns
where OIDS are stored : 18.4.2.1. Object identifiers (OIDs)
COMMA_TO_TABLE procedure : C.16.2. The COMMA_TO_TABLE procedure
COMMENT keyword : 6.1.1. The COMMIT Statement
comments : 2.5. Comments
associated with transactions : 6.1.1. The COMMIT Statement
describing parameters : 22.7.1. Document All Parameters and Their Functions
encrypted code and : 23.7.3. Impact of Encrypting Code
symbols for : 2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set
using effectively : 3.6. Using Comments Effectively
COMMIT procedure
(see also DBMS_PIPE)
C.10. DBMS_PIPE
C.15.4. The COMMIT procedure
COMMIT statement
6.1.1. The COMMIT Statement
6.11.1. Releasing Locks with COMMIT
COMMIT_COMMENT procedure : C.15.5. The COMMIT_COMMENT procedure
COMMIT_FORCE procedure : C.15.6. The COMMIT_FORCE procedure
Companion Utilities Guide : A. What's on the Companion Disk?
COMPARE function : C.6.2. The COMPARE function
comparing
collections : 19.4.4. Comparing Collections
with NULL : 4.3. NULLs in PL/SQL
objects : 18.3.6. Comparing Objects
records : 9.1.6. Comparing Two Records
strings
4.2.3.2. The VARCHAR2 and VARCHAR datatypes
11.1.13. The SOUNDEX function
comparison methods : 18.3.1. About Object Types
compilation
automatic : 23.3.1. Interdependencies of Stored Objects
errors, viewing : 23.5.4. Viewing Compilation Errors in SQL*Plus
manual : 23.3.1. Interdependencies of Stored Objects
of modules : 4.5.2. Anchoring at Compile Time
COMPILE_SCHEMA procedure : C.16.3. The COMPILE_SCHEMA procedure
compiler constructs : (see pragmas)
compiling
forced : 20.7.3. Forcing Compilation
package specifications : 1.7.3. Center All Development Around Packages
compound symbols : (see symbols)
CONCAT function
4.3.3. Function Results with NULL Arguments
11.1.3. The CONCAT function
concatenation (||) operator
4.3.3. Function Results with NULL Arguments
11.1.3. The CONCAT function
concatenation, string
4.3.3. Function Results with NULL Arguments
11.1.3. The CONCAT function
conditional control structures : 5. Conditional and Sequential Control
formatting : 3.3. Formatting Control Structures
conditional loops : (see loops)
constants : (see literals; named constants; variables)
constrained datatypes
4.4.1. Constrained Declarations
4.6. Programmer-Defined Subtypes
4.6.3. Emulating Constrained Subtypes
constructor methods
18.2.2.1. PL/SQL usage
18.3.1. About Object Types
18.4.1.1. Constructors
constructors, initializing collections : 19.4.1.1. Initializing with a constructor
control structures, iterative : (see loops)
conventions, naming : 4.7.1. Establish Clear Variable Naming Conventions
conversion
and format models : 14.1. Conversion Formats
functions for : 14. Conversion Functions
implicit : 14. Conversion Functions
CONVERT function
C.7.2. The CONVERT function
14.2.2. The CONVERT function
converting
between datatypes : 4.2.8. Conversion Between Datatypes
datatypes
external procedures and : 21.4.1. Datatype Conversion
performance and : 25.4.7. Avoid Type Conversions When Possible
explicitly versus implicitly : 4.2.8.1. Explicit data conversions
to/from hexadecimal : 14.2.3. The HEXTORAW function
to row numbers : 10.5.1. Automatic Conversion of Row Number Expressions
triggers to procedures : 25.3.7. Keep Database Triggers Small
variables to named constants : 4.7.5. Convert Variables into Named Constants
Cooperative Development Environment (CDE) : 1.2. The Concept of Programming in Oracle Applications
COPY procedure : C.6.3. The COPY procedure
correlated subqueries : 17.8.3. Replacing Correlated Subqueries
correlation variables : 18.4.2.2. REFs
COS function : 13.1.7. The COS function
COSH function : 13.1.8. The COSH function
COUNT function
10.8.2.1. The COUNT function
19.6.1. COUNT
counted loops : (see numeric FOR loops)
counting substring occurrences : 11.2.4. Counting Substring Occurrences in Strings
CREATE command : 23.5.1. Creating Stored Objects
CREATE DIRECTORY command : 4.2.7.7. Working with BFILEs
CREATE LIBRARY command
21.2.3. Step 3: Issue CREATE LIBRARY Statement
21.3.1. CREATE LIBRARY: Creating the External Procedure Library
CREATE OR REPLACE command : 23.5.3. Changing Stored Objects
CREATE TYPE BODY statement : 18.3.3. CREATE TYPE BODY: Creating a Body
CREATE TYPE command : 19.2. Creating the New Collections
CREATE TYPE ... AS OBJECT statement : 19.2.1.2. Collection as an attribute of an object type
CREATE TYPE statement : 18.3.2. CREATE TYPE and DROP TYPE: Creating and Dropping Types
CREATE VIEW statement : 20.3.1. CREATE VIEW: Creating an Object View
CREATE_QUEUE procedure : C.3.2.3. The CREATE_QUEUE procedure
CREATE_QUEUE_TABLE procedure : C.3.2.1. The CREATE_QUEUE_TABLE procedure
cursor FOR loops : 7.4. The Cursor FOR Loop
formatting : 3.3.2. Formatting Loops
premature termination of : 7.7.2.1. Premature FOR loop termination
records in : 7.4.2. The Cursor FOR Loop Record
scope of : 7.6.2.1. Scope in FOR loops
CURSOR statement : 6.4. Declaring Cursors
cursor variables
aliases for : 6.12.6.3. Cursor variable aliases
as arguments : 6.12.7. Passing Cursor Variables as Arguments
attributes of : 6.12.2. Similarities to Static Cursors
scope of : 6.12.6.4. Scope of cursor object
CURSOR_ALREADY_OPEN exception : 8.3.1. Named System Exceptions
cursors : 6.2. Cursors in PL/SQL
attributes of : 6.9. Cursor Attributes
for cursor variables : 6.12.2. Similarities to Static Cursors
%FOUND : 6.9.1. The %FOUND Attribute
%ISOPEN
6.5. Opening Cursors
6.9.4. The %ISOPEN Attribute
%NOTFOUND
6.6.2. Fetching Past the Last Row
6.9.2. The %NOTFOUND Attribute
%ROWCOUNT : 6.9.3. The %ROWCOUNT Attribute
closing : 6.8. Closing Cursors
column aliases in : 6.7. Column Aliases in Cursors
corresponding to records : 9.1.4. Guidelines for Using Records
cursor variables
1.4.5.2. Cursor variables
6.2.1. Types of Cursors
6.12. Cursor Variables
restrictions on : 6.12.8. Cursor Variable Restrictions
database access based on : 1.4.3.8. Cursor-based access to the database
declaring : 6.4. Declaring Cursors
in packages : 16.3.2. Declaring Package Cursors
examples of using : 6.13. Working with Cursors
explicit
1.7.4. Standardize Your PL/SQL Development Environment
6.2.1. Types of Cursors
6.3.3. Explicit Cursors
FETCH INTO from : 9.5.3. FETCH INTO from an Explicit Cursor
explicit, fetching from : 1.7.2. Synchronize Program and Data Structures
fetching from : 6.6. Fetching from Cursors
FOR loops for
1.6.4. The cursor FOR loop
1.7.1. Write as Little Code as Possible
group functions in : 6.13.1.1. Inefficiency of group functions in cursors
identifier precedence : 6.4.3. Identifier Precedence in a Cursor
implicit
1.7.4. Standardize Your PL/SQL Development Environment
6.2.1. Types of Cursors
6.3.1. Implicit Cursors
6.9. Cursor Attributes
6.9.5. Implicit SQL Cursor Attributes
SELECT INTO from : 9.5.2. SELECT INTO from an Implicit Cursor
naming : 6.4.1. The Cursor Name
opening
6.2.2. Cursor Operations
6.5. Opening Cursors
6.10.2. Opening Cursors with Parameters
parameters of : 6.10. Cursor Parameters
records based on : 9.3. Cursor-Based Records
RETURN statement : 6.4.4. The Cursor RETURN Clause
scope of : 15.3.5.4. Cursor scope
SELECT FOR UPDATE statement : 6.11. SELECT FOR UPDATE in Cursors
specifying in packages : 16.3. The Package Specification
static : 6.2.1. Types of Cursors
variables in : 6.4.2. PL/SQL Variables in a Cursor


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