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Index: S

SAVEPOINT procedure : C.15.12. The SAVEPOINT procedure
SAVEPOINT statement : 6.1.3. The SAVEPOINT Statement
savepoints
(see also ROLLBACK statement)
6.1.2. The ROLLBACK Statement
COMMIT statements and : 6.1.1. The COMMIT Statement
creating : 6.1.3. The SAVEPOINT Statement
saving virtual REFs : 20.4.3. Storage of Virtual REFs
scalar datatypes : (see datatypes)
scalar values and aggregates : 17.8.2. Combining Scalar and Aggregate Values
scale : 4.2.1.2. Decimal numeric datatypes
scheduling jobs
DBMS_JOB for
C.5. DBMS_ JOB
1.4.5.3. Job scheduling with DBMS_ JOB
schema evolution
object types and : 18.6.3. Schema Evolution
object views and
20. Object Views
20.6. Schema Evolution
scope
1.6.5. Scoping with nested blocks
2.7.2. Scope of a Block
15.3.4.2. Nested blocks provide scope
cursor : 15.3.5.4. Cursor scope
of cursor parameters : 6.10.3. Scope of Cursor Parameters
of cursor variables : 6.12.6.4. Scope of cursor object
of exceptions : 8.4.1. Scope of an Exception
of local modules : 15.7.5. Scope of Local Modules
of loops : 7.6.2. Loop Scope
nested blocks and : 15.3.5.2. Scope and nested blocks
second : (see date; time)
security
backups : (see backups)
encrypting code : 23.7. Encrypting Stored Code
SELECT COUNT(*) : 1.7.5. Structured Code and Other Best Practices
SELECT INTO statement : 9.5.2. SELECT INTO from an Implicit Cursor
select lists : 6.4.2. PL/SQL Variables in a Cursor
SELECT statement
assigning objects : 18.4.1.3. Assignment via FETCH (with SELECT)
in cursor declarations : 6.4. Declaring Cursors
cursors and : 6.2. Cursors in PL/SQL
SELECT FOR UPDATE statement
6.11. SELECT FOR UPDATE in Cursors
6.13.2. Managing a Work Queue with SELECT FOR UPDATE
SELECT INTO statement
initializing collections : 19.4.1.3. Initializing implicitly via fetch
THE function with : 19.5.1. The THE Pseudo-function
SELECT statements
(see also DML statements)
4.2.3.2. The VARCHAR2 and VARCHAR datatypes
9.1.5. Referencing a Record and its Fields
10.3. PL/SQL Tables and DML Statements
SELF object
18.1.2. Some Simple Examples
18.3.5. SELF: The Implied Parameter
IN mode for : 18.3.4.2. Dots in method invocations
semicolon (;) : 2.4. The Semicolon Delimiter
SEND_MESSAGE function : C.10.8. The SEND_MESSAGE function
sequential control structures : 5.2. Sequential Control Statements
formatting : 3.3. Formatting Control Structures
sequential processing : 17.8.6. Sequential Processing Against a Column's Value
serializable isolation level : 6.1.4. The SET TRANSACTION Statement
servers, PL/SQL integration with (example) : 19.7. Example: PL/SQL-to-Server Integration
session, user : 13.3.9. The USERENV function
SET clause, functions in : 17.1. Looking at the Problem
SET TRANSACTION statements : 6.1.4. The SET TRANSACTION Statement
SET_BLOCK_PROPERTY : 14.3.4. Using TO_CHAR to Create a Date Range
SET_DEFAULTS procedure : C.2.4. The SET_DEFAULTS procedure
SET_LABEL procedure : C.12.4. The SET_LABEL procedure
SET_MLS_LABEL procedure : C.12.5. The SET_NLS_LABEL procedure
SET_NLS procedure : C.12.6. The SET_NLS procedure
SET_ROLE procedure : C.12.7. The SET_ROLE procedure
SET_SQL_TRACE procedure : C.12.8. The SET_SQL_TRACE procedure
SET_UP procedure : C.13.6. The SET_UP procedure
SGA (System Global Area)
pinning critical code in : 25.2.2. Pin Critical Code into the SGA
tuning shared pool size : 25.2.1. Tune the Size of the Shared Pool of the SGA
shared
functions : 23.1.2. Executing Functions
procedures : 23.1.1. Executing Procedures
shared libraries
1.4.7.5. External procedures
for external procedures : 21.2.2. Step 2: Identify or Create the Shared Library
shared pool, SGA : 25.2.1. Tune the Size of the Shared Pool of the SGA
SIGN function : 13.1.16. The SIGN function
SIGNAL procedure : C.2.5. The SIGNAL procedure
signed numbers
4.2.1.1. Binary integer datatypes
4.2.1.3. The PLS_INTEGER datatype
simple loops
7.2. The Simple Loop
formatting : 3.3.2. Formatting Loops
SIN function : 13.1.17. The SIN function
SINH function : 13.1.18. The SINH function
size
database triggers : 25.3.7. Keep Database Triggers Small
encrypted code file size : 23.7.3. Impact of Encrypting Code
of PL/SQL code, analyzing : 23.6.3. Analyzing the Size of PL/SQL Code
SGA shared pool, tuning : 25.2.1. Tune the Size of the Shared Pool of the SGA
SLEEP procedure : C.7.5. The SLEEP procedure
SMALLINT subtype : 4.2.2. Numeric Subtypes
snapshots : C.13. DBMS_SNAPSHOT
SOUNDEX function : 11.1.13. The SOUNDEX function
source code : (see coding)
spaces : (see whitespace)
sparsity of tables
10.2. Characteristics of PL/SQL Tables
10.9.2. Data-Smart Row Numbers in PL/SQL Tables
specifcations, package : 1.7.3. Center All Development Around Packages
specification, package : (see packages, specification)
SQL
ALTER SESSION commands : C.12. DBMS_SESSION
calliong PL/SQL functions in : 25.3.2. Call PL/SQL Functions in SQL to Reduce I/O
client-side : 25.3.3. Avoid Client-Side SQL
DDL statements : (see DDL)
DML statements : (see DML statements)
dynamic
C.14. DBMS_SQL
1.4.4.2. Support for DDL and dynamic SQL
formatting statements : 3.2. Formatting SQL Statements
I/O-intensive : 25.3.6. Use PL/SQL to Improve Performance of IO-Intensive SQL
minimizing access to : 25.3.1. Use Package Data to Minimize SQL Access
PL/SQL in : (see stored functions, PL/SQL)
PL/SQL loops versus : 7.7.4. PL/SQL Loops Versus SQL Processing
statements, recursive processing in : 17.8.7. Recursive Processing in a SQL Statement
static vs. dynamic : 6.2.1. Types of Cursors
storing functions in : 1.4.4.1. Stored functions in SQL
viewing stored objects : 23.6. Using SQL to Examine Stored Objects
SQL %FOUND attribute : 6.9.5. Implicit SQL Cursor Attributes
SQL %ISOPEN attribute : 6.9.5. Implicit SQL Cursor Attributes
SQL %NOTFOUND attribute : 6.9.5. Implicit SQL Cursor Attributes
SQL %ROWCOUNT attribute : 6.9.5. Implicit SQL Cursor Attributes
SQL*Plus
managing stored objects : 23.5. Managing Stored Objects with SQL*Plus
viewing compilation errors : 23.5.4. Viewing Compilation Errors in SQL*Plus
SQL_TRACE utility : 25.1. Analyzing Program Performance
SQLCODE function
8.3.1. Named System Exceptions
8.6.3. Using SQLCODE and SQLERRM in WHEN OTHERS Clause
13.3.5. The SQLCODE function
SQLERRM function
8.6.3. Using SQLCODE and SQLERRM in WHEN OTHERS Clause
13.3.6. The SQLERRM function
SQRT function : 13.1.19. The SQRT function
standalone procedures
synonyms for : 23.2.2. Creating Synonyms for Stored Objects
STANDARD package : 8.3.1. Named System Exceptions
pinning in SGA shared pool : 25.2.2.1. Candidates for pinning in the shared pool
START_QUEUE procedure : C.3.2.6. The START_QUEUE procedure
static cursors : 6.2.1. Types of Cursors
static SQL : 6.2.1. Types of Cursors
status, module : 23.3. Module Validation and Dependency Management
STEP syntax : (see numeric FOR loops)
STEP_ID function : C.15.18. The STEP_ID function
STOP_QUEUE procedure : C.3.2.7. The STOP_QUEUE procedure
STORAGE_ERROR exception : 8.3.1. Named System Exceptions
store tables : 19.1. Types of Collections
stored
code, encrypting : 23.7. Encrypting Stored Code
functions, executing PL/SQL : 23.1.2. Executing Functions
modules/packages : 1.4.3.11. Stored procedures, functions, and packages
objects : 23. Managing Code in the Database
execute authority on : 23.2.1. Execute Authority on Stored Objects
interdependency of : 23.3.1. Interdependencies of Stored Objects
managing with SQL*Plus : 23.5. Managing Stored Objects with SQL*Plus
synonyms for : 23.2.2. Creating Synonyms for Stored Objects
viewing with SQL : 23.6. Using SQL to Examine Stored Objects
procedures, PL/SQL Version 1.1 : B. Calling Stored Procedures from PL/SQL Version 1.1
virtual REFs : 20.4.3. Storage of Virtual REFs
stored functions, PL/SQL
17.1. Looking at the Problem
17.7. Realities: Calling PL/SQL Functions in SQL
calling packaged functions : 17.5. Calling Packaged Functions in SQL
examples of : 17.8. Examples of Embedded PL/SQL
name precedence and : 17.6. Column/Function Name Precedence
package variable modification : 17.4. Restrictions on PL/SQL Functions in SQL
read consistency and : 17.7.2. Read Consistency Model Complications
requirements/restrictions : 17.3. Requirements for Stored Functions in SQL
strings
(see also literals)
2.3. Literals
adding characters to
11.1.11. The RPAD function
11.1.8. The LPAD function
case of
11.1.16. The UPPER function
11.1.4. The INITCAP function
11.1.7. The LOWER function
comparing
4.2.3.2. The VARCHAR2 and VARCHAR datatypes
11.1.13. The SOUNDEX function
concatenating : 11.1.3. The CONCAT function
converting
between character sets : 14.2.2. The CONVERT function
to/from dates
14.1. Conversion Formats
14.2.6. The TO_CHAR function (date conversion)
14.2.8. The TO_DATE function
hexadecimal : 14.2.3. The HEXTORAW function
to/from numbers
14.1.2. Number Format Models
14.2.7. The TO_CHAR function (number conversion)
14.2.9. The TO_NUMBER function
17.8.7. Recursive Processing in a SQL Statement
to row numbers : 10.5.1. Automatic Conversion of Row Number Expressions
datatypes for : 4.2.3. Character Datatypes
extracting characters from : 11.1.14. The SUBSTR function
finding substrings of : 11.1.5. The INSTR function
functions for : 11. Character Functions
justifying : 11.2.3. Filling Text to Fit a Line
length of : 11.1.6. The LENGTH function
parsing : 11.2.1. Parsing a Name
replacing characters in
11.1.10. The REPLACE function
11.1.15. The TRANSLATE function
searching for, in code : 23.6.4. Displaying and Searching Source Code
stripping characters from
11.1.12. The RTRIM function
11.1.9. The LTRIM function
variable-length : 4.2.3.2. The VARCHAR2 and VARCHAR datatypes
verifying format of : 11.2.5. Verifying String Formats with TRANSLATE
word wrap : 11.2.2. Implementing Word Wrap for Long Text
strong REF CURSOR type : (see cursor variables)
structure, code : 1.7.5. Structured Code and Other Best Practices
structure, data : (see data structures)
structured interface trace filtering : 26.4. Structured Interface Filtering
stub generation : B.1. Using Stubs to Talk to Server-Side PL/SQL
stubs : 5.2.2.3. Supporting top-down design of modules
style, coding : 1.7.4. Standardize Your PL/SQL Development Environment
subblocks : (see nested blocks; nested modules)
SUBMIT procedure : C.5.8. The SUBMIT procedure
subqueries, correlated : 17.8.3. Replacing Correlated Subqueries
SUBSTR function
C.6.14. The SUBSTR function
11.1.14. The SUBSTR function
for declaring long strings : 4.2.3.1. The CHAR datatype
substrings
counting occurrences of : 11.2.4. Counting Substring Occurrences in Strings
extracting from strings : 11.1.14. The SUBSTR function
finding : 11.1.5. The INSTR function
replacing
11.1.10. The REPLACE function
11.1.15. The TRANSLATE function
subtypes
1.4.4.4. Programmer-defined subtypes
4.6. Programmer-Defined Subtypes
suppressing zeros/spaces : 14.3.1. FM: Suppressing Blanks and Zeros
symbols
!= (not equals) : 2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set
% (percent sign) : 2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set
> (label delimeters) : 2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set
>= (greater than) : 2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set
<> (not equals) : 2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set
<= (less than) : 2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set
** (double asterisk) : 2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set
-- (comment indicator) : 2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set
/* and */ (comment block delimiters) : 2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set
; (semicolon) : 2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set
=> (associational operator for positional notation) : 2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set
\: (colon) : 2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set
_ (underscore) : 2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set
|| (concatenation) operator : 2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set
synchronization : 1.7.2. Synchronize Program and Data Structures
synchronization with columns : 4.5.1.1. Synchronization with database columns
synonyms for stored objects : 23.2.2. Creating Synonyms for Stored Objects
SYS_NC_OID$ column : 18.4.2.1. Object identifiers (OIDs)
SYS_NC_ROWINFO$ column : 18.4.2.1. Object identifiers (OIDs)
SYSDATE function : 12.1.7. The SYSDATE function
and NEW_TIME function : 12.2.2. Using NEW_TIME in Client-Server Environments
system
date : 12.1.7. The SYSDATE function
exceptions : 8.3.1. Named System Exceptions
System Global Area (SGA)
pinning critical code into : 25.2.2. Pin Critical Code into the SGA
tuning shared pool size : 25.2.1. Tune the Size of the Shared Pool of the SGA


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