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Index: Symbols and Numbers

"batch editing" : 33. Batch Editing
0 (zero) process ID : 38.12. Killing All Your Processes
-1 process ID : 38.12. Killing All Your Processes
1
C shell operator : 47.4.3.1. Assignment Operators
.n filename extension : 1.17. Filename Extensions
8-bit filenames : 23.15. Using unlink to Remove a File with a Strange Name
80cols file
42.6.1. Single Line Screen Width: 80cols
52.4. Quick Descriptions of What's on the Disc
9-track tapes : 20.6. Writing a Tape Drive on a Remote Machine
& (ampersand)
&& : 48.4.3. Automating Your Own Calendar
&& C shell operator : 47.4.3.3. Bitwise and Logical Operators
&& operator : 44.9. Testing Your Success
examples : 44.9. Testing Your Success
&& sequence : 11.9. Running a Series of Commands on a File
&= : 47.4.3.1. Assignment Operators
C shell operator : 47.4.3.3. Bitwise and Logical Operators
on command line : 1.27. How Background Processing Works
at end of commands : 38.3. Managing Processes: Overall Concepts
escaping special characters using : 51.3. ASCII Characters: Listing and Getting Values
as logical operator for expr : 45.28. Quick Reference: expr
precedence in C shell : 47.4.2. Expressions
* (asterisk)
*= C shell operator : 47.4.3.1. Assignment Operators
as arithmetic operator for expr : 45.28. Quick Reference: expr
C shell operator : 47.4.3.2. Arithmetic Operators
examples : 50.6. Searching Online Manual Pages
filename wildcard : 15.2. Filename Wildcards in a Nutshell
in pcal : 48.9. PostScript Calendars with pcal
precedence in C shell : 47.4.2. Expressions
regular expression metacharacter
26.3. Understanding Expressions
26.4.6. Repeating Character Sets with *
as wildcard character : 1.16. Wildcards
@ (at sign) : 9.5. Build Strings with { }
@ commands (csh)
47.4.2. Expressions
47.4.4. Examples
@-functions (vi) : 31.4. vi @-Functions
\ (backslash)
\< \> metacharacters : 26.4.8. Matching Words with \ < and \ >
\( \) metacharacters : 26.4.9. Remembering Patterns with \ (, \ ), and \1
\1, \2, ... metacharacters : 26.4.9. Remembering Patterns with \ (, \ ), and \1
\{ \} metacharacters : 26.4.7. Matching a Specific Number of Sets with \ { and \ }
for avoiding multiline commands : 9.13. Multiline Commands, Secondary Prompts
before newline
8.14.4. Multiline Quoting
8.15.2. How Quoting Works
in C shell scripts : 44.14. Putting awk, sed, etc., Inside Shell Scripts
for escape sequences : 8.6.1. Portability
escaping special characters : 10.3. C Shell Aliases with Command-Line Arguments
placement of : 8.20. How Many Backslashes?
preventing history substitution : 8.5. Command-Line Evaluation
in prompt settings : 7.12. External Commands Send Signals to Set Variables
quoting and : 8.14.2. How Quoting Works
in stty command : 5.9. Setting Your Erase, Kill, and Interrupt Characters
` (backquotes)
command substitution : 9.16. Command Substitution
examples
44.18. Standard Command-Line Parsing
50.3. apropos on Systems Without apropos
for loops combined with : 45.16. Standard Input to a for Loop
nesting : 45.31. Nested Command Substitution
! (bang)
!* variable : 10.3. C Shell Aliases with Command-Line Arguments
!:script : 52.4. Quick Descriptions of What's on the Disc
!= C shell operator : 47.4.3.4. Comparison Operators
!= relational operator : 45.28. Quick Reference: expr
!\* : 50.8. Which Version Am I Using?
automatic temporary files : 9.18.2. Automatic Temporary Files with !
with brackets wildcards : 15.2. Filename Wildcards in a Nutshell
in C shell quoting : 8.15.2. How Quoting Works
C shell operator : 47.4.3.3. Bitwise and Logical Operators
history substitution commands : 11.7. History Substitutions
!:n* sequence
11.4. My Favorite Is !:n*
11.7. History Substitutions
!$ sequence
10.3. C Shell Aliases with Command-Line Arguments
11.3. My Favorite Is !$
11.6. Using !$ for Safety with Wildcards
11.7. History Substitutions
NOT operator
17.1. The find Command Is Great; The Problem Is Finding How to Use It
17.6. Be an Expert on find Search Operators
preceding operators : 5.3. Setting the Terminal Type When You Log In
terms for : 51.8. Type Bang Splat. Don't Forget the Rabbit Ears
{ } (braces)
{ cmd } C shell operator : 47.4.3.3. Bitwise and Logical Operators
/{ /} metacharacters : 26.4.11. Extended Regular Expressions
\{ \} metacharacters : 26.4.7. Matching a Specific Number of Sets with \ { and \ }
Bourne shell list operators : 13.8. Using {list} to Group Bourne Shell Commands
building strings : 9.5. Build Strings with { }
in C shell : 47.4.1. Variables
creating new files with : 1.16. Wildcards
filename wildcards
15.2. Filename Wildcards in a Nutshell
15.3. Adding { } Operators to Korn (and Bourne) Shells
find -exec command and : 17.10. Running Commands on What You Find
foreach loop and : 9.11. Repeating a Command with a foreach Loop
in shells : 1.18. Who Handles Wildcards?
with variable names : 6.8. Shell Variables
[ ] (brackets)
[ command
46.4. Stop Syntax Errors in Numeric Tests
46.5. Stop Syntax Errors in String Tests
[ at start of escape sequence : 5.8. Terminal Escape Sequences
fast find and : 17.18. Using "Fast find"
filename wildcards : 15.2. Filename Wildcards in a Nutshell
regular expression metacharacter : 26.4.4. Specifying a Range of Characters with [...]
sc program using : 49.8. It's Great to Have a Spreadsheet
wildcards : 9.4. Use Wildcards to Create Files?
^ (caret)
^[ : (see CTRL key)
^^ sequence : 11.5. My Favorite Is ^^
^= C shell operator : 47.4.3.1. Assignment Operators
^^ sequence : 11.7. History Substitutions
^M : (see CTRL-m character)
C shell operator : 47.4.3.3. Bitwise and Logical Operators
filename wildcard : 15.2. Filename Wildcards in a Nutshell
in control character : 41.11.1. Special Character Codes
regular expression metacharacter : 26.4.1. The Anchor Characters: ^ and $
within [ ] metacharacters : 26.4.5. Exceptions in a Character Set
: (colon)
:p operator : 11.10. Check Your History First with :p
as alternative to # : 45.9. The Unappreciated Bourne Shell ":" Operator
as comment character : 45.9. The Unappreciated Bourne Shell ":" Operator
as parameter substitute : 45.9. The Unappreciated Bourne Shell ":" Operator
colon-separated lists : 4.10. Find All Command Versions with whereiz
examples : 44.18. Standard Command-Line Parsing
if loops using : 45.9. The Unappreciated Bourne Shell ":" Operator
as logical operator for expr
45.28. Quick Reference: expr
45.28.1. Examples
as null character : 44.8. Test Exit Status with the if Statement
as parameter substitute : 45.12. Parameter Substitution
separating fields
1.9. Which Shell Am I Running?
5.6. Checklist: Terminal Hangs When I Log In
separating values : 5.3. Setting the Terminal Type When You Log In
shell script comments : 45.2. The Story of : # #!
string editing operator : 9.6. String Editing (Colon) Operators
trap used with : 45.8. Handling Signals to Child Processes
while loops using : 45.9. The Unappreciated Bourne Shell ":" Operator
, (comma) in filenames : 1.15. Filenames
$ (dollar sign)
$0 parameter : 44.22. Finding a Program Name; Multiple Program Names
$1 command-line arguments
44.11. Set Exit Status of a Shell (Script)
44.12. Trapping Exits Caused by Interrupts
44.15. Handling Command-Line Arguments in Shell Scripts
$* argument : 45.30.1. Matching with expr
$@ argument : 45.30.1. Matching with expr
$! variable : 47.2.5. Variable Syntax
$$ command-line arguments : 44.12. Trapping Exits Caused by Interrupts
$# command-line argument : 44.15.3. Counting Arguments with $#
$< variable : 47.2.1.2. Reading Files
$() command : 45.31. Nested Command Substitution
$? variable : 47.2.1.4. More Elaborate Combinations
$* : 46.7. Quoting and Command-Line Parameters
$@ : 46.7. Quoting and Command-Line Parameters
passing arguments to getopt : 44.18. Standard Command-Line Parsing
$@ argument : 44.15.1. With the $@"
as wildcard : 44.6. Pattern Matching in case Statements
Bourne shell script variable : 44.7. Exit Status of UNIX Processes
in C shells : 47.5. Using C Shell Arrays
quoting and : 8.14.2. How Quoting Works
regular expression metacharacter : 26.4.1. The Anchor Characters: ^ and $
with variable names : 6.8. Shell Variables
$- test : 2.11. Faster ksh and bash Startup with $- Test
. (dot)
. command, subroutines compared to : 44.23. Reading Files with the . and source Commands
. scripts : 44.23. Reading Files with the . and source Commands
.. for parent directory : 18.4.2. Links to a Directory
for current directory : 18.4.2. Links to a Directory
in filenames
1.15. Filenames
1.16. Wildcards
filenames starting with : (see dot files)
in pathnames : 1.21. Making Pathnames
regular expression metacharacter
26.3. Understanding Expressions
26.4.3. Match any Character with . (Dot)
terms for : 51.8. Type Bang Splat. Don't Forget the Rabbit Ears
= (equal sign)
== C shell operator : 47.4.3.4. Comparison Operators
=~ C shell operator : 47.4.3.4. Comparison Operators
for alias definitions : 10.4. Aliases in ksh and bash
as arithmetic operator for expr : 45.28.1. Examples
C shell operator : 47.4.3.1. Assignment Operators
as relational operator for expr
45.28. Quick Reference: expr
45.28.1. Examples
# (hash mark)
: (colon) used in place of : 45.9. The Unappreciated Bourne Shell ":" Operator
#!
Bourne shell scripts using : 44.4. Testing How Your System Executes Files
#! notation
8.17. verbose and echo Variables Show Quoting
45.2. The Story of : # #!
45.4. Fun with #!
in Bourne shell scripts : 44.2. Writing a Simple Shell Program
character limit : 45.4. Fun with #!
examples
45.3. Don't Need a Shell for Your Script? Don't Use One
45.4. Fun with #!
executing files without showing : 45.5. A File That Shows Itself... and What #! Does
making programs executable : 45.4. Fun with #!
alternatives to : 45.9. The Unappreciated Bourne Shell ":" Operator
for comments : 10.2.1. Simple Aliases
in crontab entries : 40.12.1. Execution Scheduling
shell script comments : 45.2. The Story of : # #!
- (hyphen)
-= C shell operator : 47.4.3.1. Assignment Operators
-- (two dashes) as argument to set command : 44.19. The Bourne Shell set Command
- as dashes : 44.18. Standard Command-Line Parsing
as arithmetic operator for expr : 45.28. Quick Reference: expr
C shell operator
47.4.3.1. Assignment Operators
47.4.3.2. Arithmetic Operators
command-line arguments starting with
44.16. Handling Command-Line Arguments with a for Loop
44.17. Handling Arguments with while and shift
filenames starting with : 23.14. Handling a Filename Starting with a Dash (-)
with << operator : 8.18. Here Documents
in login shell : 2.16. Approved Shells: Using Unapproved Login Shell
precedence in C shell : 47.4.2. Expressions
for stdin (on command line) : 13.13. The "Filename" -
< (left angle bracket)
<= C shell operator : 47.4.3.4. Comparison Operators
<= relational operator : 45.28. Quick Reference: expr
<< C shell operator : 47.4.3.3. Bitwise and Logical Operators
<< operator
8.18. Here Documents
19.2. Introduction to Shell Archives
<<- operator
8.18. Here Documents
9.14. Using Here Documents for Form Letters, etc.
/< /> metacharacters : 26.4.11. Extended Regular Expressions
\< \> metacharacters : 26.4.8. Matching Words with \ < and \ >
C shell operator : 47.4.3.4. Comparison Operators
examples : 48.4.3. Automating Your Own Calendar
precedence in C shell : 47.4.2. Expressions
as relational operator for expr : 45.28. Quick Reference: expr
( ) (parentheses)
\( \) metacharacters : 26.4.9. Remembering Patterns with \ (, \ ), and \1
in extended regular expressions : 26.4.11. Extended Regular Expressions
grouping expressions using : 47.4.2. Expressions
as operators : 2.2. Shell Setup Files-Which, Where, and Why
subshell operators : 13.7. The () Subshell Operators
% (percent sign)
%= C shell operator : 47.4.3.1. Assignment Operators
as arithmetic operator for expr : 45.28. Quick Reference: expr
C shell operator : 47.4.3.2. Arithmetic Operators
default C shell prompt : 7.1. Why Change Your Prompt?
for job numbers
12.1.1. Foreground and Background
12.3. The "Current Job" Isn't Always What You Expect
precedence in C shell : 47.4.2. Expressions
+ (plus sign)
+= C shell operator : 47.4.3.1. Assignment Operators
as arithmetic operator for expr
45.28. Quick Reference: expr
45.28.1. Examples
C shell operator : 47.4.3.2. Arithmetic Operators
in job reports : 12.1.1. Foreground and Background
precedence in C shell : 47.4.2. Expressions
regular expression metacharacter : 26.4.11. Extended Regular Expressions
? (question mark)
?*) wildcard : 44.6. Pattern Matching in case Statements
?) wildcard : 44.6. Pattern Matching in case Statements
Bourne shell script variable : 44.7. Exit Status of UNIX Processes
examples : 47.5. Using C Shell Arrays
fast find and : 17.18. Using "Fast find"
filename wildcard : 15.2. Filename Wildcards in a Nutshell
foreach loop and : 9.11. Repeating a Command with a foreach Loop
in C shells : 47.5. Using C Shell Arrays
regular expression metacharacter : 26.4.11. Extended Regular Expressions
shell variable : 6.9. Special C Shell Variables
as wildcard character : 1.16. Wildcards
' (single quotes) : 8.14.3. Single Quotes Inside Single Quotes?
around PS1 string : 7.8. Highlighting in Shell Prompts
with bash pre-prompt commands : 7.13. Pre-Prompt Commands in bash
passing wildcards to programs : 1.18. Who Handles Wildcards?
prompt setting and : 7.4. Faster Prompt Setting with Built-Ins
protecting special characters : 10.3. C Shell Aliases with Command-Line Arguments
quoting and
8.14.2. How Quoting Works
8.15. Differences Between Bourne and C Shell Quoting
sc program using : 49.8. It's Great to Have a Spreadsheet
" (double quotes)
aliases in : 10.2.2. Using More Complex Aliases
for comments : 4.9. Setting Up vi with the .exrc File
passing wildcards to programs : 1.18. Who Handles Wildcards?
prompt setting : 7.8. Highlighting in Shell Prompts
quoting and
8.14.2. How Quoting Works
8.15. Differences Between Bourne and C Shell Quoting
sc program using : 49.8. It's Great to Have a Spreadsheet
in sed scripts : 51.6. Cleaning script Files
terms for : 51.8. Type Bang Splat. Don't Forget the Rabbit Ears
> (right angle bracket)
>= : 47.4.3.4. Comparison Operators
>& operator : 13.5. Redirection in C Shell: Capture Errors, Too?
>= relational operator
45.28. Quick Reference: expr
45.28.1. Examples
>> C shell operator : 47.4.3.3. Bitwise and Logical Operators
>> for appending files : 45.22. Handling Files Line-by-Line
C shell operator : 47.4.3.4. Comparison Operators
precedence in C shell : 47.4.2. Expressions
redirection operator : 6.9. Special C Shell Variables
as relational operator for expr : 45.28. Quick Reference: expr
; (semicolon)
on command line : 8.5. Command-Line Evaluation
separating commands : 44.12. Trapping Exits Caused by Interrupts
/ (slash)
/*/ wildcard : 44.6. Pattern Matching in case Statements
/{ /} metacharacters : 26.4.11. Extended Regular Expressions
/= C shell operator : 47.4.3.1. Assignment Operators
/< /> metacharacters : 26.4.11. Extended Regular Expressions
as arithmetic operator for expr
45.28. Quick Reference: expr
45.28.1. Examples
C shell operator : 47.4.3.2. Arithmetic Operators
fast find and : 17.18. Using "Fast find"
in filenames
1.15. Filenames
1.16. Wildcards
in pathnames
1.21. Making Pathnames
14.2. Using Relative and Absolute Pathnames
precedence in C shell : 47.4.2. Expressions
for root directory : 1.19. The Tree Structure of the Filesystem
terms for : 51.8. Type Bang Splat. Don't Forget the Rabbit Ears
~ (tilde)
C shell operator : 47.4.3.3. Bitwise and Logical Operators
ending filenames : 14.11. Finding (Anyone's) Home Directory, Quickly
filenames ending with : 17.18. Using "Fast find"
for home directory
7.11. dirs in Your Prompt: Better than $cwd
14.11. Finding (Anyone's) Home Directory, Quickly
in pathnames : 1.21. Making Pathnames
_ (underscore) in filenames : 1.15. Filenames
| (vertical bar)
26.4.11. Extended Regular Expressions
44.7. Exit Status of UNIX Processes
44.18. Standard Command-Line Parsing
(see also pipelines)
|& operator
13.3. Send (only) Standard Error Down a Pipe
13.5. Redirection in C Shell: Capture Errors, Too?
|= C shell operator : 47.4.3.1. Assignment Operators
|| operator
44.8. Test Exit Status with the if Statement
44.9. Testing Your Success
44.18. Standard Command-Line Parsing
46.6. Watch Out for Bourne Shell -e Bug
47.4.3.3. Bitwise and Logical Operators
examples : 44.9. Testing Your Success
inverse of a condition : 44.8. Test Exit Status with the if Statement
C shell operator : 47.4.3.3. Bitwise and Logical Operators
as logical operator for expr : 45.28. Quick Reference: expr
noclobber variable and : 13.6. Safe I/O Redirection with noclobber
pipes : 1.3. Programs Are Designed to Work Together
piping commands : 13.3. Send (only) Standard Error Down a Pipe
precedence in C shell : 47.4.2. Expressions
|| operator : 45.6. Making Sure Your Script Runs with Bourne Shell, Without #!


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