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Index: S

Samba, PC/NFS and: 10.2.1. NFS versus SMB (CIFS)
SATAN, diagnostics and: 14.4.5. SATAN
saturation, network collisions: 17.1.2. Collisions and network saturation
SCCS
map files: 4.2.5. Source code control for map files
maps, disadvantages: 4.2.5. Source code control for map files
schema, X.500 and: 2.2.4. X.500
SEAM (Sun Enterprise Authentication Mechanism): 12.5.5.2. SEAM: Kerberos V5 for Solaris
search paths, automounter and: 9.6.1. Long search paths
SEAS (Solaris Easy Access Server): 8.2. Setting up a diskless client
secret key, symmetric key encryption: 12.5.2.1. Symmetric key encryption
secure NFS: 12.5.4.1. Old terms: AUTH_DES, secure RPC, and, secure NFS
secure RPC: 12.5.4.1. Old terms: AUTH_DES, secure RPC, and, secure NFS
securenets file: 12.3.2.1. The secure nets file
security
ACLs: 12.4.8. Access control lists
anonymous users, mapping: 12.4.3. Unknown user mapping
asymmetric key encryption: 12.5.2.2. Asymmetric key encryption
AUTH_DH: 12.5.4. AUTH_DH: Diffie-Hellman authentication
authentication: 12.2. How secure are NIS and NFS?
AUTH_SYS security flavor: 12.2. How secure are NIS and NFS?
cryptography: 12.5.2. Brief introduction to cryptography
DCE/DFS: 12.2. How secure are NIS and NFS?
filesystem access: 12.4.4. Access to filesystems
firewalls: 12.4.7. Using NFS through firewalls
future of: 7.6.2. Security
IPsec: 12.5.3. NFS and IPSec
Kerberos V5: 12.5.5. RPCSEC_GSS: Generic security services for RPC
LDAP and: 12.2. How secure are NIS and NFS?
login restrictions: 12.1. User-oriented network security
MACs: 12.5.2.4. One-way hash functions and MACs
maps, private: 12.3.2. Making NIS more secure
netgroups: 12.1.3. Using netgroups
NFS: 12.4. NFS security
future of: 12.5.7. NFS security futures
increasing: 12.5. Stronger security for NFS
increasing, transition: 12.5.6. Planning a transition from NFS/sys to stronger NFS security
levels: 12.2. How secure are NIS and NFS?
RPC: 12.4.1. RPC security
superuser mapping: 12.4.2. Superuser mapping
version 4 and: 7.6.1. NFS Version 4
NIS
increasing: 12.3.2. Making NIS more secure
passwords: 12.3. Password and NIS security
NIS+ and: 2.2.3. NIS+
NIS levels: 12.2. How secure are NIS and NFS?
one-way hash functions: 12.5.2.4. One-way hash functions and MACs
performance and: 12.5.5.4. Security and performance
port monitoring: 12.4.6. Port monitoring
private keys: 12.5.4.6. Public and private keys
public key exchange: 12.5.2.3. Public key exchange
public keys: 12.5.4.6. Public and private keys
read-only access: 12.4.5. Read-only access
RPC: 12.4.1. RPC security
RPC/DH: 12.5.4.3. How RPC/DH works
RPCSEC_GSS: 12.5.5. RPCSEC_GSS: Generic security services for RPC
SATAN: 14.4.5. SATAN
SEAM: 12.5.5.2. SEAM: Kerberos V5 for Solaris
securenets file: 12.3.2.1. The secure nets file
services: 12.5.1. Security services
session keys: 12.5.4.8. Establishing a session key
setuid executables and: 12.4.2. Superuser mapping
SMB (CIFS): 12.2. How secure are NIS and NFS?
symmetric key encryption: 12.5.2.1. Symmetric key encryption
trusted hosts: 12.1.1. Trusted hosts and trusted users
trusted users: 12.1.1. Trusted hosts and trusted users
UIDs: 12.3.3. Unknown password entries
user-oriented: 12.1. User-oriented network security
viruses: 12.6. Viruses
server only NIS: 3.1. Masters, slaves, and clients
server response time, threshold value: 16.2. Measuring performance
server-side caching: 7.4.3. Server-side caching
server-side configuration, PC/NFS: 10.3.1. Server-side PC/NFS configuration
server-side fields (RPC), statistics: 14.2. NFS statistics
server-side performance tuning: 16. Server-Side Performance Tuning
benchmarking: 16.3. Benchmarking
server threads: 7.2.1. NFS RPC procedures
7.3.3. NFS kernel code
NFS: 7.3.1. nfsd and NFS server threads
server-to-client relationships, trusted hosts and users: 12.1.1. Trusted hosts and trusted users
server-to-server relationships, trusted hosts and users: 12.1.1. Trusted hosts and trusted users
servers
allocating, domains: 4.1.3. Number of NIS servers per domain
as clients: 3.3.11. NIS server as an NIS client
compensation, slow: 18.1. Slow server compensation
configuration
diskless clients: 8. Diskless Clients
RPCs and: 1.5.3. Internet and RPC server configuration
CPU loading, bottlenecks and: 16.4.1. Problem areas
disk bandwidth: 16.4.1. Problem areas
DNS: 5.2.3. Run DNS on NIS clients and servers
load, buffer size and: 18.3. Adjusting for network reliability problems
locating, binding the domain: 3.3.10. The ypbind daemon
log files: 14.6.1. NFS server logging mechanics
logging
configuration: 14.6.3. NFS server logging configuration
configuration files: 14.6.3. NFS server logging configuration
disabling: 14.6.9. Disabling NFS server logging
enabling: 14.6.2. Enabling NFS server logging
master server
creating: 3.2.2. Installing the NIS master server
hosts, changing: 4.3.2. Changing NIS master servers
number of: 3.2.2. Installing the NIS master server
unavailable: 3.2.2. Installing the NIS master server
ypxfr tool: 4.2.2. Regular map transfers
memory usage, bottlenecks: 16.4.1. Problem areas
multihomed: 16.5.7. Multihomed servers
network interface, bottlenecks: 16.4.1. Problem areas
NFS, troubleshooting: B.1. NFS server problems
NIS
selecting: 3.2.1. Choosing NIS servers
testing: 3.2.2. Installing the NIS master server
NLM crash: 11.2.2.1. Server crash
performance tuning: 16.5. Server tuning
buffers: 16.5.3. Memory usage
CPU loading: 16.5.1. CPU loading
cross-mounting filesystem: 16.5.6. Cross-mounting filesystems
kernel configuration: 16.5.5. Kernel configuration
memory usage: 16.5.3. Memory usage
multhomed: 16.5.7. Multihomed servers
nfsd threads: 16.5.2. NFS server threads
throughput: 16.5.4. Disk and filesystem throughput
renegade, debugging case study: 15.2. Renegade NIS server
replication, automounter: 9.5.1. Replicated servers
response time
disk-intensive activity and: 16.2. Measuring performance
users and: 16.2. Measuring performance
root privileges: 12.3.1. Managing the root password with NIS
RPC
configuration: 1.5.3. Internet and RPC server configuration
initialization: 1.5.3. Internet and RPC server configuration
slave server
adding: 3.2. Basics of NIS management
adding later: 3.2.3.1. Adding slave servers later
initializing: 3.2.3. Installing NIS slave servers
installing: 3.2.3. Installing NIS slave servers
listing: 3.2.3. Installing NIS slave servers
removing: 4.3.1. Removing an NIS slave server
slow
testing: 18.1.1. Identifying NFS retransmissions
timeo parameter and: 18.1.2. Timeout period calculation
terminal servers: 16.5.1. CPU loading
usage guage: 4.1.3. Number of NIS servers per domain
Service field, NFS log record: 14.6. NFS server logging
session keys: 12.5.4.8. Establishing a session key
session layer (7-layer model): 1.5. The session and presentation layers
setuid
executables, security and: 12.4.2. Superuser mapping
root privileges, remote files and: 12.4.2. Superuser mapping
setup
diskless clients: 8.2. Setting up a diskless client
NFS: 6.1. Setting up NFS
share command: 6.2. Exporting filesystems
enabling logging: 14.6.1. NFS server logging mechanics
exporting filesystems and: 6.2.2. Exporting options
share utility, /etc/dfs/sharetab and: 14.1. NFS administration tools
showmount command: 13.3.1.1. Identifying RPC services
14.1. NFS administration tools
slave servers: 3.1. Masters, slaves, and clients
adding: 3.2. Basics of NIS management
adding later: 3.2.3.1. Adding slave servers later
initializing: 3.2.3. Installing NIS slave servers
installing: 3.2.3. Installing NIS slave servers
listing: 3.2.3. Installing NIS slave servers
removing: 4.3.1. Removing an NIS slave server
slow servers, testing for: 18.1.1. Identifying NFS retransmissions
SMB (Server Message Block): 10.2.1. NFS versus SMB (CIFS)
(CIFS) security flavor: 12.2. How secure are NIS and NFS?
snoop: 13.5.1. snoop
14.3. snoop
filters: 14.3.1. Useful filters
NFS Server Logging utility: 14.6. NFS server logging
socket RPC: 1.5.3.1. Socket RPC and Transport Independent RPC
soft mounts, filesystems: 6.3.5. Hard and soft mounts
Solaris
diskless clients (see diskless clients)
mount command: 6.3.3. Mount options
NFS, export and: 6.2. Exporting filesystems
Solaris Easy Access Server (SEAS): 8.2. Setting up a diskless client
solstice command: 8.2. Setting up a diskless client
source code control system (see SCCS)
source code, map files: 4.2.5. Source code control for map files
source files
domain, pushing to new: 4.4. Managing multiple domains
maps: 4.2.1. Map distribution
alternate source files: 4.2.6. Using alternate map source files
NIS maps, ASCII code: 3.2.3. Installing NIS slave servers
source netgroup: 3.3.2. Netgroups
spray utility: 13.2.5. Gauging Ethernet interface capacity
stale filehandler error: 7.2.5. Pathnames and filehandles
stale filehandles
performance and: 18.8. Stale filehandles
Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation: 16.2. Measuring performance
stat( ), symbolic links and: 6.4.1. Resolving symbolic links in NFS
statd daemon, NFS startup: 6.1. Setting up NFS
state information: 1.4.1. TCP and UDP
recreating: 7.5.3. Recreating state information
stateful protocols: 1.4.1. TCP and UDP
static routing: A.1. Routers and their routing tables
A.2. Static routing
station addresses: 1.3.2. IP host addresses
statistics
filters: 14.3.1. Useful filters
NFS diagnostics: 14.2. NFS statistics
snoop and: 14.3. snoop
status daemon: 7.5.1. Lock and status daemons
stepping-stone mount points: 18.7. Mount point constructions
sticky-bit access, swap files: 8.4. Managing client swap space
strings, data representation and: 1.5.2. External data representation
subnetwork masks: 13.2.2. Subnetwork masks
substitutions, automounter maps: 9.4. Key and variable substitutions
Sun Microsystems: 0. Preface
superusers
domain, default: 3.3.8. NIS domains
keys, adding: 12.5.4.7. Creating keys
mapping, NFS: 12.4.2. Superuser mapping
restrictions: 12.4.2. Superuser mapping
swap files
sticky-bit access: 8.4. Managing client swap space
temporary: 8.4. Managing client swap space
VM system and: 8.1. NFS support for diskless clients
swap filesystem, AdminSuite: 8.2. Setting up a diskless client
swap space, diskless clients: 8.4. Managing client swap space
swapping files, ND and: 8.1. NFS support for diskless clients
switched Ethernets: 17.3.1. Switched networks
switches, networks: 17.2. Network partitioning hardware
symbolic links: 6.4. Symbolic links
absolute pathnames: 6.4.2. Absolute and relative pathnames
automounter and: 9.1.1. Indirect maps
boot blocks: 8.3.2. Getting a boot block
/export subdirectories: 8.2. Setting up a diskless client
exporting filesystems and: 6.4.3. Mount points, exports, and links
mount points construction and: 18.7. Mount point constructions
mounting filesystems and: 6.4.3. Mount points, exports, and links
mounts: 6.4. Symbolic links
relative pathnames: 6.4.2. Absolute and relative pathnames
resolving, NFS: 6.4.1. Resolving symbolic links in NFS
symmetric key encryption: 12.5.2.1. Symmetric key encryption
synchronizing time: 14.7. Time synchronization
synchronous serial line, TCP/IP: 1.1. Networking overview
system administration
NFS: 6. System Administration Using the Network File System
NIS: 4. System Management Using NIS


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