home | O'Reilly's CD bookshelfs | FreeBSD | Linux | Cisco | Cisco Exam    

Book Home

Java Security Search this book

Symbols | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Index: S

safety of servlets: 1.3.4. Safety
sandbox: 5.7. When Things Go Wrong
sandbox for servlets: 8.4.1. The Servlet Sandbox
saving state of servlets: 11.1.2. Saving the State of the Currently Loaded Servlets
SCOPE attribute: 2.6.5. JavaServer Pages and JavaBeans
search, case-insensitive: 13.3.1. Improving Deblink with Regular Expressions
secure connections: 4.4.7. How It Was Requested
Secure Sockets Layer, see SSL: 4.4.7. How It Was Requested
security
access controller: 8.4.3. Access Controllers
Base64
decoder: 8.1.2. Custom Authorization
encoding: 8.1. HTTP Authentication
RFC 1521: 8.1.2. Custom Authorization
user name and password in header: 8.1.2. Custom Authorization
certificate authorities
Entrust Technologies: 8.2. Digital Certificates
Keywitness: 8.2. Digital Certificates
Thawte Consulting: 8.2. Digital Certificates
VeriSign: 4.4.10. Extra Attributes
8.2. Digital Certificates
8.3.1. SSL Client Authentication
CGI concerns: 8.4. Running Servlets Securely
digital certificates: 8.2. Digital Certificates
Java features: 5.7. When Things Go Wrong
permission types: 8.4.2. Fine-grained Control
public-key cryptography: 8.2. Digital Certificates
requirements: 8. Security
WWW Security FAQ, web site for information: 8.4. Running Servlets Securely
see also authorization and authentication: 8. Security
security manager: 8.4.1. The Servlet Sandbox
SecurityManager class: 8.4.1. The Servlet Sandbox
SELECT statement: 9.1. Relational Databases
sendError( ) method: 5.5.1. Setting a Status Code
5.7.1. Status Codes
sendPostMessage( ) method: 10.2.3.3. Posting a serialized object
sendRedirect( ) method: 5.6.2. Redirecting a Request
serialized objects
in Java API: 1.3.2. Power
in servlets: 10.1.2. Servlets and Object Serialization
no MIME types: 10.2.3.1. The servlet
no primitive types: 10.2.3.3. Posting a serialized object
uploaded by applet: 10.2.3.3. Posting a serialized object
server certificates: 8.3. Secure Sockets Layer (SSL)
server, chat: 10.3. Chat Server
server extensible modules: 0. Preface
server extension APIs: 1.1.2.1. Server Extension APIs
Server header: 2.1.1. Requests, Responses, and Headers
server push: 6.3. Server Push
server-side applets: 0. Preface
server-side include, see SSIs: 2.4. Server-Side Includes
server-side JavaScript (SSJS): 1.1.2.3. Server-side JavaScript
server-specific pages for errors: 5.7.1. Status Codes
servers
ASP support: 1.1.2.2. Active Server Pages
ATG's Dynamo Application Server: 1.2.1. Standalone Servlet Engines
available-socket count: 6.3. Server Push
communication with applets: 10.1. Communication Options
crashing: 3.3.2. A Counter with Init and Destroy
custom class loaders: 3.2. Servlet Reloading
identifying: 4.2.1. Getting Information About the Server
Java Web Server (``Jeeves''): 0.2. About the Examples
1.2.1. Standalone Servlet Engines
see also Java Web Server: 1.2.1. Standalone Servlet Engines
Kristensen's Nexus Web Server: 1.2.3. Embeddable Servlet Engines
Lotus's Domino Go Webserver: 1.2.1. Standalone Servlet Engines
Netscape's Enterprise Server: 1.2.1. Standalone Servlet Engines
non-HTTP: 10.2.4.1. The servlet
10.2.4.2. The superclass
10.2.4.3. The applet
O'Reilly's WebSite Professional: 1.2.1. Standalone Servlet Engines
port number: 4.2.1. Getting Information About the Server
registry: 10.1.3. JDBC, RMI, and a Little CORBA
10.2.5.2. The superclass
10.2.5.2. The superclass
root directory: 4.2.1. Getting Information About the Server
servlets locking to: 4.2.2. Locking a Servlet to a Server
starting: 2.3.2. Running Hello World
WebLogic's Tengah Application Server: 1.2.1. Standalone Servlet Engines
9.2.1. JDBC Drivers
World Wide Web Consortium's Jigsaw Server: 1.2.1. Standalone Servlet Engines
SERVER_URL variable: 4.4.7. How It Was Requested
service( ) method: 2.2. The Servlet API
2.4.1. Writing a Server-Side Include
4.4.7. How It Was Requested
5.7.4. Exceptions
servlet alias: 2.3.2. Running Hello World
Servlet API
description: 2.2. The Servlet API
reference appendix: A. Servlet API Quick Reference
Servlet CGI Development Kit, web site for information: 1.2.2. Add-on Servlet Engines
Servlet class: A. Servlet API Quick Reference
servlet engines
add-on: 1.2.2. Add-on Servlet Engines
embeddable: 1.2.3. Embeddable Servlet Engines
required life-cycle contract: 3.1. The Servlet Alternative
single Java virtual machine (JVM): 3.1. The Servlet Alternative
3.1.1. A Single Java Virtual Machine
standalone: 1.2.1. Standalone Servlet Engines
web site for list of: 1.2.4. Additional Thoughts
servlet-generated applet parameters: 10.3.6. The Dispatcher
Servlet interface: 2.2. The Servlet API
servlet (singular tag): 2.3.2. Running Hello World
<SERVLET> tag
how Java Web Server supports it: 2.5. Servlet Chaining and Filters
parameters: 2.4. Server-Side Includes
syntax varies: 2.4. Server-Side Includes
ServletConfig class: 3.3. Init and Destroy
3.3.1. A Counter with Init
3.3.1. A Counter with Init
A. Servlet API Quick Reference
ServletContext class: A. Servlet API Quick Reference
ServletDebugger, web site for information: 13.7.4. Use a Third-Party Tool
ServletException class: 5.7.4. Exceptions
A. Servlet API Quick Reference
ServletExec, web site for information: 1.2.2. Add-on Servlet Engines
ServletExpress, web site for information: 1.2.2. Add-on Servlet Engines
ServletInputStream class: A. Servlet API Quick Reference
ServletOutputStream class: 5.2. Sending a Normal Response
A. Servlet API Quick Reference
ServletRequest class: 2.2. The Servlet API
A. Servlet API Quick Reference
ServletResponse class: 2.2. The Servlet API
A. Servlet API Quick Reference
servletrunner shell script (Unix): 13.7.3. Use a Standard Debugger
servletrunner.exe program (Windows): 13.7.3. Use a Standard Debugger
servlets
accepting MIME types: 4.4.8. Request Headers
accessing
by alias: 2.3.2. Running Hello World
by registered name: 2.3.2. Running Hello World
by URL with /servlet/: 2.3.2. Running Hello World
accessing stored procedures: 9.5.1. Stored Procedures
authentication: 8.1.2. Custom Authorization
automatic reloading: 11.1. Servlet Manipulation
chaining: 2.5. Servlet Chaining and Filters
4.4.8.2. Headers in servlet chains
collaboration: 11.3. Servlet Collaboration
combining HTTP, non-HTTP, and RMI: 10.1.4. The Hybrid Approach
10.2.5.4. A full-service servlet
communication with applets: 10.1.3. JDBC, RMI, and a Little CORBA
10.3. Chat Server
communication with other servlets: 11. Interservlet Communication
daemon servlets: 10.2.4.2. The superclass
debugging: 13.7. Debugging
definition: 1. Introduction
direct manipulation: 11.1. Servlet Manipulation
dispatch servlet: 10.3.1. The Design
efficiency: 1.3.3. Efficiency and Endurance
elegance: 1.3.5. Elegance
email: 13.2. Sending Email
embedded in HTML pages
limited response capability: 2.4.1. Writing a Server-Side Include
SSI functionality: 2.4. Server-Side Includes
embedding applets: 6.1.5. An Image of an Embedded Applet
environment variables: 4. Retrieving Information
error-handling mechanisms: 5.7.1. Status Codes
see also status codes: 5.7.1. Status Codes
events listed: 13.7.1. Check the Logs
executing external programs: 13.4. Executing Programs
extensibility: 1.3.7. Extensibility and Flexibility
handled as JavaBeans: 3.3. Init and Destroy
hung up on: 5.7.5. Knowing When No One's Listening
identifying client machines: 4.3.1. Getting Information About the Client Machine
4.4.8. Request Headers
identifying MIME types: 4.4.3.3. Getting MIME types
identifying referrals: 4.4.8. Request Headers
identifying servers: 4.2.1. Getting Information About the Server
identifying users: 4.3.3. Getting Information About the User
image chaining: 11.3.1.2. Faster image chaining
initialization: 3.3. Init and Destroy
input streams: 4.4.9. Wading the Input Stream
integration: 1.3.6. Integration
JavaSoft: 0. Preface
life cycle: 3.1. The Servlet Alternative
7.5.3. The Session Life Cycle
locking to specific server: 4.2.2. Locking a Servlet to a Server
logging errors: 5.7.2. Logging
main( ) method not used: 2.2. The Servlet API
non-Western European languages: 12.3. Non-Western European Languages
object serialization: 1.3.2. Power
10.1.2. Servlets and Object Serialization
10.2.3.3. Posting a serialized object
10.2.3.3. Posting a serialized object
persistence: 1.3.3. Efficiency and Endurance
3.1. The Servlet Alternative
3.1.2. Instance Persistence
5.3. Using Persistent Connections
portability: 1.3.1. Portability
power: 1.3.2. Power
problem reports: 5.7.3. Reporting
purpose: 0. Preface
registered name: 2.3.2. Running Hello World
2.4.1. Writing a Server-Side Include
3.1.5. A Holistic Counter
4.1.2. Getting Init Parameter Names
reloading: 3.2. Servlet Reloading
remote object servlet: 10.2.5.1. The servlet
10.2.5.2. The superclass
10.2.5.2. The superclass
response
body: 5.1. The Structure of a Response
structure: 5.1. The Structure of a Response
returning MIME types: 6. Sending Multimedia Content
reusing abilities of another servlet: 11.2. Servlet Reuse
11.2.2. Reusing ChatServlet
RMI clients: 13.6. Acting as an RMI Client
runner for debugging: 13.7.3. Use a Standard Debugger
sandbox for safety: 8.4.1. The Servlet Sandbox
saving state of: 3.3.2. A Counter with Init and Destroy
3.3.2. A Counter with Init and Destroy
11.1.2. Saving the State of the Currently Loaded Servlets
session-tracking built-in: 7.5. The Session Tracking API
sharing data with each other: 3.1. The Servlet Alternative
sharing information: 11.3.2. Collaboration Through a Shared Object
special treatment by server: 2.3.2. Running Hello World
ssinclude: 2.5.2. Running Deblink
2.5.3. The Loophole
stack traces: 5.7.2. Logging
5.7.3. Reporting
5.7.3. Reporting
5.7.4. Exceptions
status codes
reference appendix: C. HTTP Status Codes
reporting: 5.7.1. Status Codes
superclass for socket connection details: 10.2.4.1. The servlet
support classes: 3.2. Servlet Reloading
testing: 13.7. Debugging
trouble with: 5.7. When Things Go Wrong
type safety: 1.3.4. Safety
unloading: 3.3.2. A Counter with Init and Destroy
verifying: 11.1.1. Viewing the Currently Loaded Servlets
ServletUtils class: 5.7.3. Reporting
session
creation time: 7.5.3. The Session Life Cycle
invalidation: 7.5.3. The Session Life Cycle
last-request time: 7.5.3. The Session Life Cycle
newness: 7.5.3. The Session Life Cycle
session IDs: 7.5.5. Putting Sessions in Context
session objects: 7.5.1. Session-Tracking Basics
deleting: 7.5.1. Session-Tracking Basics
giving values to: 7.5.1. Session-Tracking Basics
retrieving: 7.5.1. Session-Tracking Basics
retrieving names of: 7.5.1. Session-Tracking Basics
retrieving values from: 7.5.1. Session-Tracking Basics
session-tracking
API: 7.5. The Session Tracking API
built into servlets: 7.5. The Session Tracking API
how to implement: 7.5.5. Putting Sessions in Context
techniques: 7. Session Tracking
setAutoCommit( ) method: 9.4.1. Using Transactions with JDBC
9.4.3. Connection Pooling
setComment( ) method: 7.4.1. Working with Cookies
setContentLength( ) method: 5.3. Using Persistent Connections
setContentType( ) method: 5.2. Sending a Normal Response
6.1. Images
6.1.1.1. A ``Hello World'' image
setDateHeader( ) method: 5.6.1. Setting an HTTP Header
setDomain( ) method: 7.4.1. Working with Cookies
setHeader( ) method: 5.6.1. Setting an HTTP Header
5.6.3. Client Pull
setIntHeader( ) method: 5.6.1. Setting an HTTP Header
setMaxAge( ) method: 7.4.1. Working with Cookies
setName( ) method: 2.6.5. JavaServer Pages and JavaBeans
setPath( ) method: 7.4.1. Working with Cookies
setRequestProperty( ) method: 10.2.2.2. Back to the applet
setSecure( ) method: 7.4.1. Working with Cookies
setStatus( ) method: 5.5.1. Setting a Status Code
5.7.1. Status Codes
setValue( ) method: 7.4.1. Working with Cookies
setVersion( ) method: 7.4.1. Working with Cookies
shared objects: 11.3.2. Collaboration Through a Shared Object
shared references: 11.3.3.1. Inheriting a shared reference
sharing information: 11.3.2. Collaboration Through a Shared Object
Shift_JIS (Japanese) charset: 12.3.1. Charsets
shopping-cart example: 7.2. Hidden Form Fields
.shtml extension: 2.4.1. Writing a Server-Side Include
2.5.2. Running Deblink
Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP): 13.2. Sending Email
single-thread model: 3.4. Single-Thread Model
SingleThreadModel class: A. Servlet API Quick Reference
SingleThreadModel interface: 3.4. Single-Thread Model
singleton: 11.3.2.1. Using a shared class to sell burritos
11.3.2.2. Using a servlet as the shared object
11.3.3.1. Inheriting a shared reference
skeleton classes: 10.2.5.1. The servlet
SmtpClient class: 13.2.1. Using sun.net.smtp.SmtpClient
socket connections
low-level management: 10.2.4.2. The superclass
raw socket connections: 10.1.1. HTTP and Raw Socket Connections
10.3.1. The Design
11.2.1. An Improved getServlet( )
socket connections, initiated by applet only: 10.2.4.1. The servlet
SOCKS-based proxies: 10.1.3. JDBC, RMI, and a Little CORBA
software license: 4.2.2. Locking a Servlet to a Server
special characters: 12.1. Western European Languages
special effects in images: 6.1.3. Image Effects
6.1.4. Image Effects in Filter Chains
SQL
API: 9.2. The JDBC API
10.1.3. JDBC, RMI, and a Little CORBA
control characters: 9.2.8. Using Prepared Statements
data types, list of: 9.2.5. Result Sets in Detail
definition: 9.1. Relational Databases
DELETE statement: 9.1. Relational Databases
exceptions: 9.2.4. Handling SQL Exceptions
PL/SQL language: 9.5.1. Stored Procedures
PreparedStatement class: 9.2.8. Using Prepared Statements
9.3.2. Reusing Prepared Statements
queries, executing: 9.2.3. Executing SQL Queries
reference book: 9.1. Relational Databases
SELECT statement: 9.1. Relational Databases
stored procedures
accessing: 9.5.1. Stored Procedures
precompiled and faster: 9.5.1. Stored Procedures
transactions
auto-commit status: 9.4.1. Using Transactions with JDBC
Connection objects: 9.4.1. Using Transactions with JDBC
connection pool: 9.4.3. Connection Pooling
definition: 9.4. Transactions
JDBC: 9.4.1. Using Transactions with JDBC
updating databases: 9.2.7. Updating the Database
SQL for Dummies book: 9.1. Relational Databases
<SQL> tag: 2.5. Servlet Chaining and Filters
ssinclude servlet: 2.5.2. Running Deblink
2.5.3. The Loophole
SSIs (server-side includes): 2.4. Server-Side Includes
4.4.1. Request Parameters
SSJS: 1.1.2.3. Server-side JavaScript
SSL
connection examples: 4.4.10. Extra Attributes
getScheme( ) method: 4.4.7. How It Was Requested
introduced by Netscape: 8.3. Secure Sockets Layer (SSL)
Java Web Server supports SSL 3.0: 8.3.1. SSL Client Authentication
stack traces: 5.7.2. Logging
5.7.3. Reporting
5.7.3. Reporting
5.7.4. Exceptions
Standard Query Language, see SQL: 9.1. Relational Databases
Statement class
executeQuery( ) method: 9.2.3. Executing SQL Queries
executing SQL queries: 9.2.3. Executing SQL Queries
getResultSet( ) method: 9.2.7. Updating the Database
getUpdateCount( ) method: 9.2.7. Updating the Database
static variable: 3.1.5. A Holistic Counter
static variables and methods: 11.3.3.2. Inheriting the shared information
status codes
definition: 5.1. The Structure of a Response
partial table of: 5.5. Status Codes
reference appendix: C. HTTP Status Codes
reporting: 5.7.1. Status Codes
server-specific pages: 5.7.1. Status Codes
setting: 5.5.1. Setting a Status Code
Stop button, in browser: 5.7.5. Knowing When No One's Listening
stop( ) method: 3.5. Background Processing
stopping threads: 3.5. Background Processing
stored procedures
accessing: 9.5.1. Stored Procedures
precompiled and faster: 9.5.1. Stored Procedures
stub classes: 10.2.5.1. The servlet
subclassing: 5.4.2.3. Weather forecast using HTML generation creatively
Sun
100% Pure Java: 13.5. Using Native Methods
Java Software division, see JavaSoft: 0. Preface
Java Web Server (``Jeeves'')
back door for servlet's registered name: 4.1.2. Getting Init Parameter Names
bug with chained servlet: 2.5.3. The Loophole
bug with getRequestURI( ): 4.4.5. Determining What Was Requested
bug with PrintWriter: 2.4.1. Writing a Server-Side Include
modular design: 4.4.4. Serving Files
permission types: 8.4.2. Fine-grained Control
programmatic access to security: 8.1.2. Custom Authorization
security manager: 8.4.1. The Servlet Sandbox
session-tracking: 7.5. The Session Tracking API
supports SSL 3.0: 8.3.1. SSL Client Authentication
used in this book: 2.3.2. Running Hello World
web site for information: 0.2. About the Examples
1.2.1. Standalone Servlet Engines
JavaMail API: 13.2. Sending Email
JavaServer Administration Tool
configuration page: 8.4.2. Fine-grained Control
for MIME-based filtering: 2.5.3. The Loophole
URL for access: 2.3.2. Running Hello World
JavaServer Engine, web site for information: 1.2.3. Embeddable Servlet Engines
JavaServer Toolkit, web site for information: 1.2.3. Embeddable Servlet Engines
JSDK (Java Servlet Development Kit)
bare-bones simplicity: 2.3.2. Running Hello World
description: 2.3.2. Running Hello World
minimal session-tracking: 7.5. The Session Tracking API
web site for downloading: 0.2. About the Examples
1.2. Support for Servlets
13.7.3. Use a Standard Debugger
JSPs (JavaServer Pages): 1.3.7. Extensibility and Flexibility
2.6. JavaServer Pages
superclass for socket connection details: 10.2.4.1. The servlet
super.init(config) must be called: 3.3.1. A Counter with Init
4.1.1. Getting an Init Parameter
support classes: 3.2. Servlet Reloading
synchronization
avoiding: 3.4. Single-Thread Model
ignoring: 3.1.4. A Simple Synchronized Counter
of blocks: 3.1.4. A Simple Synchronized Counter
of methods: 3.1.4. A Simple Synchronized Counter
using judiciously: 13.8.3. Limit Synchronization
System class
exit( ) method: 2.3.5. Handling HEAD Requests
getProperties( ).get( ) method: 11.3.1. Collaboration Through the System Properties List
getProperties( ).put( ) method: 11.3.1. Collaboration Through the System Properties List
11.3.1. Collaboration Through the System Properties List
getProperties( ).remove( ) method: 11.3.1. Collaboration Through the System Properties List
11.3.1. Collaboration Through the System Properties List
getProperty( ) method: 4.2.1. Getting Information About the Server


Symbols | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z
Library Navigation Links

Copyright © 2001 O'Reilly & Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.







??????????????@Mail.ru