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Index: S

scope of transactions: 8.2.1 Transaction Scope
8.2.1 Transaction Scope
(see also propagation of transactions)
secure communications: 3.2.6 Security
EJB servers, support for: 3.2.6 Security
security: 3.2.6 Security
AccessControlEntry class: A.2.1 AccessControlEntry
assembly-descriptor element: 10.5 Describing Beans
CORBA attempt to standardize: 1.6.2 EJB and CORBA CTMs
EJB 1.1, changes in: D.5 Security
EJBContext interface: A.1.3 EJBContext
runAs identity: 3.2.6.2 EJB 1.0: Method-driven access control
3.2.6.2 EJB 1.0: Method-driven access control
setting attributes for: 4.2.6 EJB 1.0: The Deployment Descriptor
4.3.5 EJB 1.0: The TravelAgent Beans' Deployment Descriptor
security identity: 3.2.6 Security
3.2.6.2 EJB 1.0: Method-driven access control
Principle objects: 3.2.6.1 EJB 1.1: Role-driven access control
security restrictions, avoiding with HTML: 11.3 Web Components and EJB
security-role element
in assembly-descriptor: 10.6 Describing Bean Assembly
assembly-descriptor, specifying in: 10.6.2 Specifying Security Roles and Method Permissions
security-role-ref element: 10.5.1 Session and Entity Beans
10.5.6 Security Roles
security roles: 3.2.6.1 EJB 1.1: Role-driven access control
assembly-descriptor element: 4.2.5 EJB 1.1: The Deployment Descriptor
clients, identifying by: 6.2.4 EJB 1.1: EJBContext
6.2.5 EJB 1.0: EJBContext
mapping to methods in remote and home interfaces: 10.6.2.1 Assigning roles to methods
sequence diagrams for bean types: B. State and Sequence Diagrams
serializable data types: 6.1.4 Java RMI Return Types, Parameters, and Exceptions
Java RMI-IIOP restrictions on: 5.2.2.1 EJB 1.1: Java RMI-IIOP type restrictions
Serializable isolation level: 8.3.3 Transaction Isolation Levels
performance problems with: 8.3.4 Balancing Performance Against Consistency
server-side component models: 1.4 Component Models
1.6 CTMs and Server-Side Component Models
(see also EJB)
benefits of standard: 1.6.3 Benefits of a Standard Server-Side Component Model
CTMs and: 1.6 CTMs and Server-Side Component Models
ORBs, inadequacy of: 1.5.3 CTMs: The Hybrid of ORBs and TP Monitors
specifications for: 1.6 CTMs and Server-Side Component Models
server-side components: 1.1.2 Server-Side Components
CTMs, comprehensive environment for: 1.5.3 CTMs: The Hybrid of ORBs and TP Monitors
ORBS, inadequacy of: 1.1.3 Component Transaction Monitors
pooling instances of: 3.1.1 Instance Pooling
server-side implementation, EJBObject interface: 2.1.3.1 The EJB object
servers: 1.3 Distributed Object Architectures
(see also object servers)
application servers: 1.1.3 Component Transaction Monitors
containers and: 2.3.1 The Container-Server Contract
containers vs.: 2.1.1 Classes and Interfaces
direct database access: 9.9.2.1 Direct database access with JDBC
EJB
portability among: 1. Introduction
services, handling: 2.1.2 Deployment Descriptors and JAR Files
vendors of: C. EJB Vendors
entity beans, not supporting: 9.9 When Entity Beans Are Not an Option
JNDI access: 3.2.5 Naming
PersonServer object (example): 1.3.1 Rolling Your Own Distributed Object
1.3.1 Rolling Your Own Distributed Object
relationship with beans: 2.3 The Bean-Container Contract
selection and setup: 4.1 Choosing and Setting Up an EJB Server
transaction management (in EJB): 8.2.4 Transaction Propagation
transaction monitors (EJB): 8.2.4 Transaction Propagation
service providers: 5.1 Locating Beans with JNDI
services
CORBA: 3.2 Primary Services
directory services (see directory services; JNDI)
distributed object protocols, providing: 1.3.1 Rolling Your Own Distributed Object
distributed objects, naming and directory services: 3.2.5 Naming
J2EE application servers, required: 11.4.2 Guaranteed Services
primary, in EJB: 3.2 Primary Services
Servlet interface: 11. Java 2, Enterprise Edition
Servlets
J2EE servers, required support of: 11.4.2 Guaranteed Services
similarity to sessions beans: 11.1 Servlets
session beans: 2.1 The Enterprise Bean Component
2.1.1.5 What about session beans?
3.1.1.3 Instance swapping
7. Session Beans
concurrent access, not supporting: 3.2.1 Concurrency
container-transaction element declarations: 10.6 Describing Bean Assembly
deployment: 4.3.8 Deploying the TravelAgent Bean
developing (example): 4.3 Developing a Session Bean
bean class: 4.3.3 TravelAgentBean: The Bean Class
client application, creating: 4.3.9 Creating a Client Application
home interface: 4.3.2 TravelAgentHome: The Home Interface
JAR files: 4.3.6 EJB 1.1: The JAR File
4.3.7 EJB 1.0: The JAR File
remote interface: 4.3.1 TravelAgent: The Remote Interface
SessionDescriptors: 4.3.6 EJB 1.1: The JAR File
EJB 1.1, new features in: D.2 Session Beans
emulating entity beans with: 9.9.1 Emulating Entity Beans with Session Beans
entity beans vs.: 2.2.2 Modeling Workflow with Session Beans
7. Session Beans
7.3.1.5 Why use a Reservation entity bean?
9.3.3 Striking a Balance
explicit transaction management: 8.5 Explicit Transaction Management
find methods: 4.3.2 TravelAgentHome: The Home Interface
5.2.3.4 Creating and finding beans
handles, ability to use on: 5.2.5.5 The bean handle
improving performance with: 9.3 Improved Performance with Session Beans
limiting to workflow: 9.9.2 Workflow
managing processes or tasks with: 2.1 The Enterprise Bean Component
nonreentrance policy: 3.2.1.1 Reentrance
remove methods: 5.2.3.1 Removing beans
5.2.3.1 Removing beans
removing: 5.2.5.4 Removing beans
servlets, similarity to: 11.1 Servlets
states: 3.1.1.3 Instance swapping
transaction notification in SessionSynchronization (diagram): B.2.3 EJB 1.1: Interactions Between Exceptions and Transactions
transactional attributes in deployment descriptor: 10.6.1 Specifying a Bean's Transactional Attributes
workflow, limiting to: 9.9.2.1 Direct database access with JDBC
workflow, modeling with: 2.2.2 Modeling Workflow with Session Beans
4.3 Developing a Session Bean
4.3.3.1 EJB 1.1: TravelAgentBean
session elements: 4.2.5 EJB 1.1: The Deployment Descriptor
10.5 Describing Beans
session-type element: 4.3.4 EJB 1.1: TravelAgent Bean's Deployment Descriptor
10.5.1 Session and Entity Beans
SessionBean interface: 2.3 The Bean-Container Contract
7.2.2.1 Transitioning to the Method-Ready Pool
A.1.17 SessionBean
SessionContext interface: 2.3 The Bean-Container Contract
A.1.18 SessionContext
SessionDescriptor class: 2.1.2.1 EJB 1.0: Deployment descriptors
4.3.5 EJB 1.0: The TravelAgent Beans' Deployment Descriptor
4.3.6 EJB 1.1: The JAR File
A.2.5 SessionDescriptor
SessionSynchronization interface: 8.8 Transactional Stateful Session Beans
A.1.19 SessionSynchronization
transaction notifications in: B.2.2 Stateful Session Beans
set and get methods: 8.3.2 Database Locks
(see also get(; set( )))
business methods, defining as: 6.1.5 The ShipBean Class
manipulating with properties: 6.1.1.1 Set and get methods
naming conventions: 6.1.1.1 Set and get methods
remote interface: 6.1.1.1 Set and get methods
setEntityContext( )
EJBContext interface: 6.3.2 The Pooled State
EntityContext interface: 6.1.7 The EntityContext
setEnvironmentProperties( ) (DeploymentDescriptor): 6.2.6.2 EJB 1.0: Using JDBC in EJB
setRollBackOnly( )
UserTransaction interface: 8.5.3 UserTransaction
setSessionContext (SessionBean): 7.2.2.1 Transitioning to the Method-Ready Pool
setSessionTimeout( ) (SessionDescriptor): 4.3.5 EJB 1.0: The TravelAgent Beans' Deployment Descriptor
setStateManagement( ) (SessionDescriptor): 4.3.5 EJB 1.0: The TravelAgent Beans' Deployment Descriptor
setTransactionTimeout (UserTransaction): 8.5.3 UserTransaction
simple relationships (entity beans): 9.7.1 Simple Associations
9.7.1.5 Native Java persistence
single-field primary keys: 6.1.2 The Primary Key
EJB 1.0 and 1.1 support for: 6.1.2.2 Single-field key
skeletons: 1.3 Distributed Object Architectures
listening for requests from stubs: 1.3 Distributed Object Architectures
Person_Skeleton example: 1.3.1 Rolling Your Own Distributed Object
small-icon element: 10.4 The Descriptor's Body
session or entity element: 10.5.1 Session and Entity Beans
Smalltalk language: 1.1.2 Server-Side Components
snapshots: 8.3.2 Database Locks
source code for beans, downloading from O'Reilly web site: 7.1.1 Downloading the Missing Pieces
SPECIFIED_IDENTITY mode: 3.2.6.2 EJB 1.0: Method-driven access control
SQL requests, using JDBC Prepared Statement for: 6.2.7 The ejbCreate( ) Method
SQL standard: 1.6.3 Benefits of a Standard Server-Side Component Model
database table, defining: 6.1 Container-Managed Persistence
relational database, EJB server support: 4.1 Choosing and Setting Up an EJB Server
SQLException: 6.2.12 EJB 1.0: Deploying the Bean-Managed Ship Bean
7.3.1.5 Why use a Reservation entity bean?
SSL (secure socket layer), supporting secure communications: 3.2.6 Security
state: 7. Session Beans
(see also conversational state; life cycle)
bean-managed persistence, advantages in managing: 6.2 Bean-Managed Persistence
callback methods for managing: 2.1.1.3 The bean class
containers, generating logic to save: 6.1 Container-Managed Persistence
entity beans (see under life cycle)
IllegalStateException: 6.2.3 EntityContext
session beans and: 2.2.2.1 Stateless and stateful session beans
stateful session beans (see under life cycle)
stateless session beans (see under life cycle)
synchronization of: 3.2.3.1 Object-to-relational persistence
state and sequence diagrams for bean types: B. State and Sequence Diagrams
stateful session beans: 2.2.2.1 Stateless and stateful session beans
7. Session Beans
7.3 The Stateful Session Bean
7.4.3 Passivated State
activation: 3.1.2 The Activation Mechanism
B.2.2 Stateful Session Beans
bean class, defining: 7.3.1.4 TravelAgentBean: The bean class
bean-managed transactions, setting transaction isolation levels: 8.3.4.1 EJB 1.1: Controlling isolation levels
chaining: 9.10 Avoid Chaining Stateful Session Beans
conversational state: 7.3 The Stateful Session Bean
database updates: 8.8 Transactional Stateful Session Beans
deployment descriptors
EJB 1.0: 7.3.1.8 EJB 1.0: The TravelAgent deployment descriptor
XML-based: 7.3.1.7 EJB 1.1: The TravelAgent deployment descriptor
as extension of client: 7.3 The Stateful Session Bean
handles: 7.1.2.2 ProcessPayment: The remote interface
home interface: 7.3.1.2 TravelAgentHome: The home interface
instance pooling, not using: 7.4 The Life Cycle of a Stateful Session Bean
life cycle: 7.4 The Life Cycle of a Stateful Session Bean
7.4.3 Passivated State
diagrams of: B.2.2 Stateful Session Beans
Does Not Exist state: 7.4.1 Does Not Exist
Method-Ready state: 7.4.2.1 Transitioning to the Method-Ready state
Method-Ready state to Passivated state: 7.4.2.3 Transitioning out of the Method-Ready state
Passivated state: 7.4.3 Passivated State
transactional method-ready state: 8.8.1.1 Transitioning into the Transactional Method-Ready state
open connections: 7.3.1.4 TravelAgentBean: The bean class
operations allowed for: B.2.2 Stateful Session Beans
remote interface: 7.3.1 The TravelAgent Bean
application exceptions: 7.3.1.1 TravelAgent: The remote interface
definition (example): 7.3.1.1 TravelAgent: The remote interface
runAs Identity: 3.2.6.2 EJB 1.0: Method-driven access control
sequence diagrams: B.2.2 Stateful Session Beans
session-type element: 4.3.4 EJB 1.1: TravelAgent Bean's Deployment Descriptor
10.5.1 Session and Entity Beans
10.5.1 Session and Entity Beans
transactional: 8.8 Transactional Stateful Session Beans
9.9.1 Emulating Entity Beans with Session Beans
transactions across methods: 8.5.1 Transaction Propagation in Bean-Managed Transactions
workflow management: 7.3.1.4 TravelAgentBean: The bean class
stateless session beans: 2.2.2.1 Stateless and stateful session beans
7. Session Beans
7.1 The Stateless Session Bean
applications for: 7.1 The Stateless Session Bean
bean class: 7.1.2.6 ProcessPaymentBean: The bean class
concurrent access, not supporting: 3.2.1 Concurrency
3.2.1 Concurrency
conversational state: 7.1 The Stateless Session Bean
definition (example): 7.1.2 The ProcessPayment Bean
deployment descriptors
EJB 1.0 version: 7.1.2.10 EJB 1.0: The ProcessPayment bean's deployment descriptor
properties: 7.1.2.6 ProcessPaymentBean: The bean class
XML-based: 7.1.2.9 EJB 1.1: The ProcessPayment bean's deployment descriptor
ejb-ref element: 4.3.4 EJB 1.1: TravelAgent Bean's Deployment Descriptor
home interface: 7.1.2.5 ProcessPaymentHome: The home interface
instance pooling: 3.1.1.3 Instance swapping
7.2 The Life Cycle of a Stateless Session Bean
instance swapping: 3.1.1.3 Instance swapping
instance variables: 7.1 The Stateless Session Bean
life cycle: 7.2 The Life Cycle of a Stateless Session Bean
Does Not Exist state: 7.2.1 Does Not Exist
Does Not Exist state to Method-Ready Pool transition: 7.2.2.1 Transitioning to the Method-Ready Pool
Method-Ready Pool: 7.2.2 The Method-Ready Pool
7.2.2.2 Life in the Method-Ready Pool
state diagram: B.2.1 Stateless Session Beans
transition from Method-Ready Pool to Does Not Exist state: 7.2.2.3 Transitioning out of the Method-Ready Pool: The death of a stateless bean instance
open connections: 7.2.2.1 Transitioning to the Method-Ready Pool
operations allowed for: B.2.1 Stateless Session Beans
ProcessPayment bean example: 7.1.2 The ProcessPayment Bean
remote interface: 7.1.2.2 ProcessPayment: The remote interface
7.1.2.2 ProcessPayment: The remote interface
application exceptions: 7.1.2.4 PaymentException: An application exception
dependent classes: 7.1.2.3 Dependent classes: The CreditCard and Check classes
handle: 7.1.2.2 ProcessPayment: The remote interface
runAs Identity: 3.2.6.2 EJB 1.0: Method-driven access control
sequence diagram: B.2.1 Stateless Session Beans
source code, downloading from O'Reilly web site: 7.1.1 Downloading the Missing Pieces
UserTransaction transactions: 8.5.1 Transaction Propagation in Bean-Managed Transactions
using from within stateful session beans: 9.10 Avoid Chaining Stateful Session Beans
Status interface, providing current status of transactional objects: 8.5.4 Status
String class, using in primary keys: 6.1.2.2 Single-field key
String types: 6.1.4 Java RMI Return Types, Parameters, and Exceptions
strings (arrays of) in listing behavior: 7.3.1.6 listAvailableCabins( ): Listing behavior
stubs: 1.3 Distributed Object Architectures
business methods, invoking: 2.1.3.2 The EJB home
EJB objects, passing by value: 5.2.2 EJB 1.1 and 1.0: The Java RMI Programming Model
EJB objects, returning to client: 6.3.3.1 Transitioning from the Pooled state to the Ready State via creation
EJBObject interface, implementing: 2.1.3.1 The EJB object
implementing multiple interfaces, IIOP and: 5.2.2.2 EJB 1.1: Explicit narrowing using PortableRemoteObject
as object server surrogates on clients: 1.3 Distributed Object Architectures
Person_Stub example: 1.3.1 Rolling Your Own Distributed Object
as remote references to object server: 1.3.1 Rolling Your Own Distributed Object
session beans, reducing number of: 2.2.2 Modeling Workflow with Session Beans
subsystems exceptions: 6.2.2 Exception Handling
7.1.2.4 PaymentException: An application exception
7.4.3.1 system exceptions
Sun Microsystems
development of Enterprise JavaBeans: 1.6.2 EJB and CORBA CTMs
EJB packages, downloading from Java site: 4.1.1 Setting Up Your Java IDE
Supports transaction attribute: 8.2.3 Transaction Attributes Defined
swapping bean instances: 3.1.1.2 Overview of state transitions
6.2.3 EntityContext
stateful session beans, not using: 7.4 The Life Cycle of a Stateful Session Bean
synchronization
bean-managed persistence: 6.2.8 The ejbLoad( ) and ejbStore( ) Methods
6.3.3.3 Transitioning from the Pooled state to the Ready State via activation
6.3.4 Life in the Ready State
container-managed persistence: 6.1.8.4 Using ejbLoad( ) and ejbStore( ) in container-managed beans
6.1.8.4 Using ejbLoad( ) and ejbStore( ) in container-managed beans
6.3.4 Life in the Ready State
B.1.2 quence Diagrams for Container-Managed Persistence
persistent fields to database (container-managed): 6.3.3.3 Transitioning from the Pooled state to the Ready State via activation
state of bean instance: 3.2.3.1 Object-to-relational persistence
synchronous messaging: 1.5.1 TP Monitors
system exceptions
application exceptions vs.: 7.1.2.4 PaymentException: An application exception
EJB 1.1: 7.4.3.1 system exceptions
in transactions: 8.6.1.1 System exceptions
system-level functionality, CTMs providing for distributed objects: 1.5.4 Analogies to Relational Databases
system-level infrastructure, lacking in ORBs: 1.5.2 Object Request Brokers
SYSTEM_IDENTITY mode: 3.2.6.2 EJB 1.0: Method-driven access control


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