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Index: P

packet : 1.3. TCP/IP Protocol Architecture
authentication : 7.4.2. RIP Version 2
bogus, interjecting : 5.3.1.1. Options
capturing : 5.3.1.2. Pseudo-device
damaged : 6.1.1. Determining the Interface Name
filters : 11.7.1. Packet Filters
constructing : 11.7.1. Packet Filters
in firewalls : 12.7. Firewalls
primitives used, listed : 11.7.1. Packet Filters
options in DHCP : 3.6.1. Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol
queued : 6.1.1. Determining the Interface Name
routing : 1.5.1.1. The datagram
switching : 1.5.1.1. The datagram
update : 7.4.1. Routing Information Protocol
packetsize : 11.3.1. The ping Command
PAP (Password Authentication Protocol)
6.3.4. PPP Daemon Security
A.2. The PPP Daemon
pap-secrets file : 6.3.4. PPP Daemon Security
Parallel Line IP (PLIP) : 5.2. Linux Kernel Configuration
parallel multipart subtype : 3.4.3. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions
parentheses (), for continuation characters : C.3.1. Standard Resource Records
partial message subtype : 3.4.3. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions
passing data : (see data communications model)
passive option
in pppd : 6.3.5. PPP Server Configuration
in RIP
7.4.1.1. Running RIP with routed
7.7.1.2. Interior gateway configurations
passwd command line : 12.2.1. The Shadow Password File
passwd file
6.3.5. PPP Server Configuration
6.4.3. SLIP Server Configuration
9.1.5. NFS Authentication Server
9.3. Network Information Service
10.4.1.1. Building a sendmail.cf with m4 macros
12.2.1. The Shadow Password File
13.2.1. Creating an FTP Server
protecting : 12.2. User Authentication
in security checks : 12.4.2. Looking for Trouble
password
1.7. Application Layer
(see also shadow password file)
aging : 12.2.1. The Shadow Password File
changing frequently : 12.2. User Authentication
tricks used to avoid : 12.2.1. The Shadow Password File
choosing : 12.2.2. Choosing a Password
guidelines for : 12.2.2. Choosing a Password
command : 6.3.2. Dial-Up PPP
guessing or stealing : 12.2. User Authentication
one-time
Preface
12.2.3. One-Time Passwords
systems for : 12.2.3. One-Time Passwords
seemingly random, constructing : 12.2.2. Choosing a Password
writing down : 12.2.4. OPIE
Password Authentication Protocol (PAP) : A.2. The PPP Daemon
password-based authentication
7.4.3. Open Shortest Path First
7.7.1.2. Interior gateway configurations
9.1.5. NFS Authentication Server
path MTU discovery code : 5.2. Linux Kernel Configuration
path vector protocols : 7.5.2. Border Gateway Protocol
pattern matching : 10.6.1. Pattern Matching
symbols for : 10.5.3. The Define Class Command
PC NFS Authentication and Print Server (pcnfsd) : 9.1.5. NFS Authentication Server
PCI bus : 5.3.1.3. Devices
PCM audio subtype : 3.4.3. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions
pcnfsd.conf file : 9.1.5.1. NFS print services
PDUs (Protocol Data Units) : 11.9. Simple Network Management Protocol
peer
3. Network Services
7.5.2. Border Gateway Protocol
B.5. Options Statements
clauses : 7.7.1.3. Exterior gateway configuration
level communications : 1.2. A Data Communications Model
subclauses : B.8.5. The bgp Statement
Perimeter Network : 12.7. Firewalls
periods (..) for domain name : C.3.1. Standard Resource Records
personal mail forwarding : 10.3.1. Personal mail forwarding
PGP (Pretty Good Privacy) : 12.6.1. When is symmetric encryption useful?
physical
network
1.5.1.2. Routing datagrams
2.3. Subnets
2.6. Address Resolution
3.5.1. Reverse Address Resolution Protocol
address, embedded in response : 3.6. Bootstrap Protocol
independence from
1.1.1. TCP/IP Features
6. Configuring the Interface
security : 12.1.1. Assessing the Threat
serial ports : 6.4.4. Troubleshooting Serial Connections
Physical Layer
1.2. A Data Communications Model
6.1.1. Determining the Interface Name
ping command
6.4.4. Troubleshooting Serial Connections
7.2. The Minimal Routing Table
statistics displayed by
11.3.1. The ping Command
11.4.3. Checking the Interface with netstat
in troubleshooting : 11.3. Testing Basic Connectivity
pipe character (|) separating multiple printer names : 9.2.1. The printcap File
plain text subtype : 3.4.3. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions
planning sheets : 4.6.1. Sample Planning Sheets
PLIP (Parallel Line IP) : 5.2. Linux Kernel Configuration
plumb/unplumb parameters : 6.1.5.5. Point-to-point
plus sign (+) indicating a trusted host : 12.2.5. Secure the r Commands
point-to-point interfaces
6.1.5.5. Point-to-point
B.6. Interface Statements
defined : 6.1.1. Determining the Interface Name
Point-to-Point Protocol : (see PPP)
pointers : 3.3.2. Creating Domains and Subdomains
poison reverse feature : 7.4.1.1. Running RIP with routed
policy-based routing : 7.5.2. Border Gateway Protocol
database : 2.4. Internet Routing Architecture
polling
7.5.1. Exterior Gateway Protocol
11.9. Simple Network Management Protocol
trap-directed : 11.9. Simple Network Management Protocol
POP (Post Office Protocol)
3.4.2. Post Office Protocol
4.5.3. Planning Your Mail System
commands, listed : 3.4.2. Post Office Protocol
mail server : 9.7.1. POP Server
pop3d.tar : 9.7.1. POP Server
popper17.tar : 9.7.1. POP Server
port
1.2. A Data Communications Model
2.7.3. Sockets
numbers
1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol
2.7. Protocols, Ports, and Sockets
2.7.2. Port Numbers
passing : 2.7.3. Sockets
randomly generated : 3.6. Bootstrap Protocol
portmapper : 2.7.2. Port Numbers
Positive Acknowledgment : 1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol
with Re-transmission (PAR) : 1.6.2. Transmission Control Protocol
Post Office Protocol : (see POP)
post office servers : (see mailbox servers)
PostScript application subtype : 3.4.3. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions
pound sign (#) for comments
3.2. The Host Table
5.4. The Internet Daemon
7.7.1.1. A host configuration
9.1.4. NFS Automounter
9.2.1. The printcap File
9.4. A BOOTP Server
A.1.1. The dip Script File
D.3. The dhcpd.conf Configuration File
power outage, possible effects of
9.4. A BOOTP Server
9.5.1. dhcpd.conf
PPP (Point-to-Point Protocol)
5.2. Linux Kernel Configuration
5.3.1.2. Pseudo-device
6.2.1. The Serial Protocols
daemon (pppd) : 6.3.1. The PPP Daemon
command-line options : 6.3.1. The PPP Daemon
overriding address exchanges : 6.3.1. The PPP Daemon
security in : 6.3.4. PPP Daemon Security
tools reference : A.2. The PPP Daemon
as default : A.1.1. The dip Script File
installing
6.1.5.5. Point-to-point
6.3. Installing PPP
interoperability and : 6.2.2. Choosing a Serial Protocol
server configuration : 6.3.5. PPP Server Configuration
in Solaris : 6.3.6. Solaris PPP
tools reference : A. PPP Tools
ppp directory, protecting : A.2. The PPP Daemon
ppplogin : 6.3.5. PPP Server Configuration
.ppprc file : A.2. The PPP Daemon
precedence : 10.5.6. Defining Mail Precedence
Predictor-1 compression : A.2. The PPP Daemon
preference values
7.6.1. gated's Preference Value
B.6. Interface Statements
B.8.5. The bgp Statement
B.9. static Statements
B.10. Control Statements
high-cost : 7.7.1.2. Interior gateway configurations
negative : B.10.1. The import Statement
prefix-length : 2.2.2. Classless IP Addresses
Presentation Layer : 1.2. A Data Communications Model
Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) : 12.6.1. When is symmetric encryption useful?
primary nameservers
3.3.4. BIND, resolver, and named
4.4.1. Obtaining a Domain Name
8.1.1. BIND Configurations
C.2. named.boot Configuration Commands
configuring : 8.3.1.2. Primary and secondary server configurations
print servers : 3.7.2. Print Services
configuring
4.5.2. Print servers
9.2.1. The printcap File
print spool directory, making
9.1.5.1. NFS print services
9.2.1. The printcap File
printcap file : 9.2.1. The printcap File
printers
multiple : 9.2.1. The printcap File
queue display : 9.2.1.2. Using LPD
security : 9.2.1.1. LPD security
priority of messages, assigning
10.5.6. Defining Mail Precedence
B.8.4. The isis Statement
private argument : 6.1.5.3. Metric
procmail : E.3.5. MAILER
prog pattern : 13.3.1. archie
promiscuous mode
6.1.5.5. Point-to-point
11.7.1. Packet Filters
interface : 5.3.1.2. Pseudo-device
proto clauses
7.7.1.3. Exterior gateway configuration
A.1. Dial-Up IP
B.10.2. The export Statement
protocol
analyzers
5.3.1.2. Pseudo-device
11.7. Analyzing Protocol Problems
12.2.3. One-Time Passwords
client server : 11.9. Simple Network Management Protocol
manager/agent : 11.9. Simple Network Management Protocol
minor : 2.7.1. Protocol Numbers
name, alias for : 2.7.1. Protocol Numbers
number
1.5.1.4. Passing datagrams to the transport layer
2.7.1. Protocol Numbers
problems, troubleshooting : 11.7. Analyzing Protocol Problems
stack
1.2. A Data Communications Model
11.1. Approaching a Problem
standards
1.1.2. Protocol Standards
1.7. Application Layer
statements (in gated) : B.8. Protocol Statements
suite : 1.2. A Data Communications Model
tracing : B.1. The gated Command
Protocol Data Units (PDUs) : 11.9. Simple Network Management Protocol
protocols file
2.7.1. Protocol Numbers
5.4. The Internet Daemon
9.3. Network Information Service
proxy servers
4.2.1. Obtaining an IP Address
5.3.1.1. Options
12.7. Firewalls
providing on a firewall : 12.7.1. Functions of the firewall
proxyarp option : A.2. The PPP Daemon
ps command : 12.4.1. Know Your System
pseudo-device statement : 5.3.1.2. Pseudo-device
pseudo-domains : 10.7.1. Modifying Local Information
pseudo-terminals : 5.3.1.2. Pseudo-device
PTR resource records
8.3.5. The Reverse Domain File
C.3.1.6. Domain Name Pointer record
ptys : 5.3.1.2. Pseudo-device
public-key encryption : 12.6. Encryption
pulse code modulation (PCM) audio subtype : 3.4.3. Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions


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