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Index: S

SCO : 1.9.5. Control Keys
scripts
built-in commands implemented as : 4.1. Shell Scripts and Functions
comments in : 4.3.1. Syntax of String Operators
order of precedence in command lookup
4.1.1. Functions
7.3. Command-line Processing
running : 4.1. Shell Scripts and Functions
SECONDS : 3.4.3.1. Miscellaneous Variables
security
Summary of Korn Shell Features
3.2.1. Tracked Aliases
10.3. System Security Features
Korn shell features pertaining to : 10.3. System Security Features
problem with PATH
3.4.2.5. Command Search Path
10.3.2. A System Break-in Scenario
restricted shell : (see restricted shell)
suid interactive shells : 10.3.2. A System Break-in Scenario
Trojan horse schemes : 10.3.2. A System Break-in Scenario
sed
1.7.1. Standard I/O
4.3.2. Patterns and Regular Expressions
4.3.2.2. Korn shell versus awk/egrep regular expressions
10.1. Installing the Korn Shell as the Standard Shell
select
Summary of Korn Shell Features
5.4. select
6.3. Arrays
7.2.2.4. Reading User Input
A.1. The Bourne Shell
A.2. The IEEE 1003.2 POSIX Shell Standard
description : 5.4. select
lists of names in : 5.4. select
PS3 prompt in : 5.4. select
redirecting I/O to : 7.2.2.2. I/O Redirection and multiple commands
syntax : 5.4. select
set : (see options)
+o (turn off option)
3.3. Options
9.1.1. Set Options
-A (array assignment)
6.3. Arrays
6.3.3. String Formatting Options
-o (turn on option)
3.3. Options
9.1.1. Set Options
A.1. The Bourne Shell
output of in next release : A.7. The Future of the Korn Shell
SHELL
3.4.3.1. Miscellaneous Variables
3.5.1. Environment Variables
A.1. The Bourne Shell
shell compilers : 9. Debugging Shell Programs
shell variables, list of : B.3. Built-in Shell Variables
shift
6.1.1. shift
6.1.3. getopts
signals
8.2. Job Control
8.3. Signals
ALRM
A.6. Workalikes on PC Platforms
A.7. The Future of the Korn Shell
DEBUG : (see fake signals)
description : 8.3. Signals
effect of on processes : 8.3.2. kill
ERR : (see fake signals)
EXIT : (see fake signals)
fake : (see fake signals)
hangup : (see HUP)
HUP : 8.4.3. Ignoring Signals
ignoring : 8.4.3. Ignoring Signals
INT
8.3.1. Control-key Signals
8.3.2. kill
8.4. trap
8.4.1. Traps and Functions
8.4.2. Process ID Variables and Temporary Files
9.1.2.1. EXIT
A.2. The IEEE 1003.2 POSIX Shell Standard
A.6. Workalikes on PC Platforms
KILL
8.3.1. Control-key Signals
8.3.2. kill
8.3.3.1. System V
lack of propagation to subshells
8.6.1. Subshell Inheritance
A.7. The Future of the Korn Shell
listing : 8.3. Signals
other types of : 8.3.1. Control-key Signals
in POSIX shell : A.2. The IEEE 1003.2 POSIX Shell Standard
propagation to subshells in next release : A.7. The Future of the Korn Shell
QUIT
8.3.1. Control-key Signals
8.3.2. kill
8.3.3.1. System V
sending with control keys : 8.3.1. Control-key Signals
shown in background job status messages : 8.3.2. kill
specifying in trap command : 8.4. trap
STOP : A.6. Workalikes on PC Platforms
TERM
8.3.2. kill
8.4. trap
8.4.2. Process ID Variables and Temporary Files
9.1.2.1. EXIT
A.2. The IEEE 1003.2 POSIX Shell Standard
trapping : (see traps)
TSTP
8.2. Job Control
8.3.1. Control-key Signals
sleep : 8.4. trap
SNOBOL : 4.2. Shell Variables
sort
1.7.1. Standard I/O
1.7.2. I/O Redirection
1.7.3. Pipelines
1.8. Background Jobs
1.8.1. Background I/O
4.3.1. Syntax of String Operators
5.2. for
7.2.2. read
8.2.2. Suspending a Job
special characters : 4.2.2. More on Variable Syntax
spell : 4.1. Shell Scripts and Functions
stacks : 4.5. Advanced Examples: pushd and popd
Stallman, Richard : A.5. bash
standard I/O : (see I/O)
string I/O : (see print, read)
string operators
4.3. String Operators
A.1. The Bourne Shell
# (length) : 4.3.4. Length Operator
:+
4.3.1. Syntax of String Operators
5.2. for
:-
4.3.1. Syntax of String Operators
4.5. Advanced Examples: pushd and popd
9.2.3.4. Break conditions
:= : 4.3.1. Syntax of String Operators
:?
4.3.1. Syntax of String Operators
4.5. Advanced Examples: pushd and popd
in next release : A.7. The Future of the Korn Shell
summary of functionality : 4.3. String Operators
syntax : 4.3.1. Syntax of String Operators
stty : 1.9.5. Control Keys
to customize control-key signals : 8.3.1. Control-key Signals
subprocesses : 3.5. Customization and Subprocesses
subshells
4.1. Shell Scripts and Functions
8. Process Handling
8.6. Subshells
information passed from parent processes : 3.5. Customization and Subprocesses
inheritance of properties from parent shells : 8.6.1. Subshell Inheritance
nested
8.6.2. Nested Subshells
9.2.3.6. Limitations
A.2. The IEEE 1003.2 POSIX Shell Standard
compared to code blocks : 8.6.2. Nested Subshells
suid : A.6. Workalikes on PC Platforms
suid shell scripts
10.3.2. A System Break-in Scenario
10.3.4. Privileged Mode
creating : 10.3.2. A System Break-in Scenario
dangers of : 10.3.2. A System Break-in Scenario
SunOS
1. Korn Shell Basics
1.3. History of UNIX Shells
1.9.5. Control Keys
4.4. Command Substitution
system calls
exec : 8.5. Coroutines
fork : 8.5. Coroutines
pipe : 8.5. Coroutines
wait : 8.5. Coroutines
System III : 1.9.5. Control Keys
System V
1.9.5. Control Keys
3.4.2.4. Terminal Types
System V Release 4
1.3.1. The Korn Shell
1.4. Getting the Korn Shell


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