Jump to content United States-English
HP.com Home Products and Services Support and Drivers Solutions How to Buy
 Contact HP
More options
HP.com home
HP-UX Reference > S

sh(1)

HP-UX 11i Version 3: February 2007
 

Technical documentation

Feedback
Content starts here

  Table of Contents

  Index

NAME

sh — overview of various system shells

SYNOPSIS

POSIX Shell

sh [aefhikmnoprstuvx] [o option] ... [-c string] [arg ...]

rsh [aefhikmnoprstuvx] [o option] ... [-c string] [arg ...]

Korn Shell

ksh [aefhikmnoprstuvx] [o option] ... [-c string] [arg ...]

rksh [aefhikmnoprstuvx] [o option] ... [-c string] [arg ...]

C Shell

csh [-cefinstvxTVX] [command_file] [argument_list ...]

Key Shell

keysh

DESCRIPTION

Remarks

The POSIX .2 standard requires that, on a POSIX-compliant system, executing the command sh activates the POSIX shell (located in file /usr/bin/sh on HP-UX systems), and executing the command man sh produces an on-line manual entry that displays the syntax of the POSIX shell command-line.

However, the sh command has historically been associated with the conventional Bourne shell, which could confuse some users. To meet standards requirements and also clarify the relationships of the various shells and where they reside on the system, this entry provides command-line syntax and a brief description of each shell, and lists the names of the manual entries where each shell is described in greater detail.

NOTE: The Bourne shell (/usr/old/bin/sh) is removed from the system starting with HP-UX 11i Version 1.5. Please use the POSIX shell (/usr/bin/sh) as an alternative.

Shell Descriptions

The HP-UX operating system supports the following shells:

sh

POSIX-conforming command programming language and command interpreter residing in file /usr/bin/sh. Can execute commands read from a terminal or a file. This shell conforms to current POSIX standards in effect at the time the HP-UX system release was introduced, and is similar to the Korn shell in many respects. Similar in many respects to the Korn shell, the POSIX shell contains a history mechanism, supports job control, and provides various other useful features.

ksh

Korn-shell command programming language and commands interpreter residing in file /usr/bin/ksh. Can execute commands read from a terminal or a file. This shell, like the POSIX shell, contains a history mechanism, supports job control, and provides various other useful features.

csh

A command language interpreter that incorporates a command history buffer, C-language-like syntax, and job control facilities.

rsh

Restricted version of the POSIX shell command interpreter. Sets up a login name and execution environment whose capabilities are more controlled (restricted) than normal user shells.

rksh

restricted version of the Korn-shell command interpreter Sets up a login name and execution environment whose capabilities are more controlled (restricted) than normal user shells.

keysh

An extension of the standard Korn Shell that uses hierarchical softkey menus and context-sensitive help.

To obtain:Use the command:
POSIX Shell/usr/bin/sh ...
Korn Shell/usr/bin/ksh ...
C Shell/usr/bin/csh ...
Key Shell/usr/bin/keysh

These shells can also be the default invocation, depending on the entry in the /etc/passwd file. See also chsh(1).

WARNINGS

Many manual entries contain descriptions of shell behavior or describe program or application behavior similar to ``the shell'' with a reference to ``see sh(1)''.

SEE ALSO

For more information on the various individual shells, see:

keysh(1)

Key Shell (/usr/bin/keysh) description.

ksh(1)

Korn Shell (/usr/bin/ksh) description.

sh-posix(1)

POSIX Shell (/usr/bin/sh) description.

csh(1)

C Shell (/usr/bin/csh) description.

Printable version
Privacy statement Using this site means you accept its terms Feedback to webmaster
1983-2007 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.